Black Transgender Women/Men: Redefining Womanhood?

Janet Mock...

Take a real good look at this person.  This is a black man. Or is it? Well I guess it depends on who you ask.  This person on the cover of Metro Weekly is Janet Mock.  The tagline on the magazine says “mighty real”.  Which is very misleading since there is not much real when looking at this cover.  You see Janet Mock  was born a man.  Which means he has a penis.   As far as I know he hasn’t had his penis removed so he’s still a man. But that’s my definition.  But according to this deranged European culture I’m living in I’m supposed to call him a woman. But isn’t Janet just a man in a dress? If I put on an astronaut suit does it make me an astronaut? If I paint myself white does it make me a white man?  I wouldn’t think so.  But the fact they we have to call these people a certain gender because it’s what they “feel” like shows you we are way off course.  We have really lost our minds.

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And what’s really scary is that more and more black people are accepting this false reality.  One of the most popular men  in this transgender movement  is Laverne Cox(pic above).  Cox has been on numerous mainstream magazine covers. He’s been on so many I’ve lost count.  Covers that many authentic black women have never been on.  Why is that?  Is the racist white media trying to redefine black womanhood? Are they trying to portray black women as more masculine by having men imitate them? Sure looks like it to me.  I think it’s a way to destroy the divine feminine principle. It seems like a combination of both sexism and racism.  In a way it’s an insult to both black men and women. Are they trying to get rid of black alpha males? This is really sick and twisted!

Laverne Cox1...

Amiyah Scott....

Then we have actor Amiyah Scott. Amiyah is on the drama Star. Star is produced by well known homosexual Lee Daniels.  Much like his other show Empire,Star is full of masculine lesbians,homosexuals,transgenders,violence,crime and interracial sex.  All the things Daniels loves to portray as normal for the black community.  By having more transgenders on network television it normalizes it.  Which is the purpose in my view.

I don’t really follow the transgender/homosexual culture so I never knew about this.  But they actually have transgender contests.  It’s really big in Atlanta.  The video(above) is a contest in which men compete to see who looks the most like a woman.  It’s called the “I AM BALL” contest.  I could tell they were all men so I don’t know how the hell you pick  a winner.

Lesbians...

Not to be left out but they also have a competition for a female to male transition.  This is were females compete to see who looks the most like a man. This is really crazy to watch.  I can’t believe they actually have a contest for this type of thing.  What the hell is going on in Atlanta? I thought it was knows as “Black Mecca”.  Is this what our people are now embracing?

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche is a Nigerian writer of novels and short stories.  In the video(above) she says that you can’t compare the struggles of women that were born women with transwomen.  She says that it’s not the same thing because they have been women since birth.  Just so you know the term being used today is cisgender. You will hear terms like cis male or cis female.  Which means “male assigned male at birth”. Assigned??  I thought that you are whatever you were at birth.  But you see how they’re making up all these terms to confuse us. Well at any rate Adiche was attacked by actor Laverne Cox. Cox disagreed with Adiche’s statement.   Although she didn’t address Adiche directly,here’s the statement by Cox:

“I was talking to my twin brother today about whether he believes I had male privilege growing up. I was a very feminine child though I was assigned male at birth. My gender was constantly policed. I was told I acted like a girl and was bullied and shamed for that. My femininity did not make me feel privileged. I was a good student and was very much encouraged because of that but I saw cis girls who showed academic promise being nurtured in the black community I grew up in in Mobile, Ala. Gender exists on a spectrum & the binary narrative which suggests that all trans women transition from male privilege erases a lot of experiences and isn’t intersectional. Gender is constituted differently based on the culture we live in. There’s no universal experience of gender, of womanhood. To suggest that is essentialist & again not intersectional. Many of our feminist foremothers cautioned against such essentialism & not having an intersectional approach to feminism. Class, race, sexuality, ability, immigration status, education all influence the ways in which we experience privilege so though I was assigned male at birth I would contend that I did not enjoy male privilege prior to my transition. Patriarchy and cissexism punished my femininity and gender nonconformity. The irony of my life is prior to transition I was called a girl and after I am often called a man. Gender policing & the fact that gender binaries can only exist through strict policing complicates the concept of gendered privilege & that’s OK cause it’s complicated. Intersectionality complicates both male and cis privilege. This is why it is paramount that we continue to lift up diverse trans stories. For too many years there’s been far too few trans stories in the media. For over 60 years since Christine Jorgensen stepped off the plane from Europe and became the first internationally known trans woman the narrative about trans folks in the media was one of macho guy becomes a woman. That’s certainly not my story or the stories of many trans folks I know. That narrative often works to reinforce binaries rather than explode them. That explosion is the gender revolution I imagine,one of true gender self determination.”

What was this garbage?  This Cox character has lost his mind! All this talk of gender policing and gender binaries is total nonsense.  He was assigned male at birth because he is a MAN.  It’s just that simple.  All these terms are just going to confuse the younger generation.  They will see homosexuals,lesbians and transgenders as just normal behavior.    This is why men like Cox,Janet Mock and Amiyah Scott are given books and television appearances.

Gender neutral....

This is another reason people are debating gender neutral restrooms.  Why is this even a debate?  A man in a dress should not be able to go into a women’s restroom.  There are little girls in there.  No one wants a man pretending to be a woman in a women’s restrooms.  And I don’t think most men would want a transgender men in a men’s restroom.  This shows you how sick European culture has become.  It is going right down the toilet.  And this is all by design.  And this is a serious issue for black people because we live among them.  It is destroying how we view sexuality and womanhood. As I said before I think it’s a way of redefining black womanhood. And to destroy the divine feminine principle.  I hope black people are paying attention.  We are truly living in Hell.

2017 Women’s March: Black Female Perspective

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Following Trump’s inauguration a series of Women’s Marches occurred throughout North America. The protests erupted to preserve the female liberties seemingly threatened by a “conservative” president who boasted of sexually assaulting women. As a female, I empathize and even support the initiatives that foment this March. However, although a woman, I know that I am inevitably black first. Thus, I can’t help but feel that by supporting the women’s march is to support the very means of my oppression.

On my a tri-weekly journey to a previous job, I recall seeing a number of protestors outside of Planned Parenthood at the wee hours of the morning seeking to shame female patrons. One protestor stood out from the others—an elderly white man surely north of seventy-five. He stood hunched over, holding an oaktag with a message written in ballpoint pen. I did not bother to read the poster, but judging by the stoic expression on his face, he was there to cast the stones of white male privilege onto the female body. Standing at the intersectionality of race and gender, the black woman knows this gaze all to well. While the literal gaze casts itself onto the black female body countless places throughout North America, the figurative gaze consumes black femininity in its entirety. The women’s march solely speaks to the “woman” component of this gaze, eliminating the most defining characteristic of black female identity.

Reproductive rights in general proves controversial to  the black female trajectory. A quick glance at history reveals that the black female endured sheer deprivation in terms of reproductive rights—her body used as means for mayoral economic franchisement. White women too encompassed an existence that also regarded them as property, however their fair skin warranted privileges denied to the black female body. These exclusive liberties afforded to white women illustrate the concept of “woman” as a privilege solely applicable to non-male whites. Consider the phrasing “black” woman. The label “Black woman” illustrates that black female intersectionality separates black females from the term’s initial meaning. For any “woman” of another marginalized faction, their race or ethnicity always precedes the term woman—proving their genitals deem them female but their race and ethnicity is first and foremost. Femininity is also a privilege extended exclusively to non-male whites. This exclusivity persists as the black female body only earns femininity when adopting western aesthetics and behavior.

Given the exclusivity of the term “woman,” I find it quite disturbing that white women ( and other oppressed groups) call on the black women for support in their times of distress, yet alienate the black female body when their children, brothers and fathers lay slain on the streets or untagged in the morgue. How many white women “said her name” after Sandra Bland was murdered? How many white women were overtly outraged after the Trayvon Martin verdict was rendered?

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To take a trip down memory lane, how many white female feminists supported Tawana Brawley in her 1988 trial? If autonomy over the female body is right every woman deserves- why was their no feminist congregation when this young, black girl was sexually assaulted by a number of white men? The answer is simple.  Issues that engage both blackness and femininity become “black” issues instantaneously. This fact reveals that feminism is simply not built to encompass intersectional identities and thereby is not equipped to extinguish black female disenfranchisement.

It seems that former President Barack Obama’s victory disgruntled feminists, who supported this victory as long as it was a symbol of the feminist victory to follow.  It seems feminists felt that history would repeat itself. Namely, black male voting privilege preceded white female voting liberties.  Thus, feminists deemed Clinton’s victory inevitable following Obama’s 2008 victory. Dr. Angela Davis expressed a similar sentiment in the following excerpt from her book Women, Race and Class,

“The representative women of the nation have done their uttermost for the last thirty years to secure freedom for the negro; and as long as he was lowest in the scale of being, we were willing to press his claims, but now, as the celestial gate to civil rights is sIowly moving on its hinges, it becomes a serious question whether we had better stand aside and see ‘Sambo’ walk into the kingdom first.” (Davis 70)

Now that it seems that the black collective has something that the white female collective does not, the bells of white privilege right loudly under the veil of feminism.

Feminism functions to afford white women the same liberties as white men. The main component of these liberties is racism—deeming black female participation in any feminist activity injurious. Thus, to participate in a woman’s march as a black woman is to   march along to the stagnant beat of white supremacy. For the black woman is a queen, but to the western world she will never truly be  a woman.

Article written by C.C. Saunders