Is racism really just a term for warfare?

In this excellent podcast by Onitaset, he examines the futile use of the term “Racism/White Supremacy” (RWS). He also gives illustrious analogies and metaphors as to why the common focus Black people have on “ending racism” is a dead-end road for Afrikan people, and Afrikans would be better off not only revitalizing our culture and nations to fit the threats we collectively face in the 21st century, but to actively seek power through the institutions and tools that are most useful at present.

I once read an exchange with a Neely Fuller-ite who was trying to seek sympathy for an east Eurasian woman who was allegedly being victimized by RWS. You can read the post here entitled, “The Counter-Racist Cul-De-Sac”. The commentator in opposition to this characterization mentioned that the Asian woman was indeed described correctly by the western Eurasian white woman as not being an “American” (read: white European). Furthermore, this east Eurasian woman had a west Eurasian boyfriend which is typical of these white-identified east Eurasian woman who are raised in the USA by parents who want them to be accepted by the dominate society as a member of the “model race” or an “honorary white”. The Fuller-ite couldn’t understand that the commentator was arguing that RWS only exists because it is a convenient excuse for Afrikans not organizing our own resources for achieving power, and that if the east Eurasian woman truly didn’t like RWS, she should re-patriate to an east Eurasian country which has plenty of nuclear weapons and a robust economy where she will be a first-class citizen. This obvious solution which was based in reality was rejected by the Fuller-ite because he needed to believe that “whites control everything and gave the nuclear weapons to the east Eurasians, therefore whites are still in control”, even if she decides to re-patriate. This is such a self-defeating position because it disables us, Afrikan people, from taking the initiative to secure our own survival. The west Eurasian woman went on to say that she was a supporter of Donald Trump and she voted for him so that “we can get you people out of our country”.

Sun Tzu...

A white woman like that would be regarded as a right-wing extremist or a white nationalist. Regardless of her label, I implore you to read the following article from a typical “white-leftist” whom you Afrikan people think is your friend and the last bulwark against the racist right. You can read the full article at this link.

To summarize the article, the writer basically stated that she lived in Senegal for a year as a Peace Corps volunteer, and interspersed among the references to the “brotherhood of man”, “personal fulfillment”, and “adopted family” tripe that these fake liberals routinely espouse, she states a viewpoint similar to that of a right-wing fanatic. Namely, that Afrikan and west Eurasian (American) cultures are too different to be compatible, and that the solution is to let Afrikans solve their own problems and to keep America white by not allowing Afrikan migration to the USA! This mind you after she was fully funded and welcomed by Afrikans to live for a year in their country. But, be that as it may, this statement of hers is counter-intuitive the negros who need to be part of the “Kumbaya Klan”. (pun intended) However, increasingly, with the ease of global travel, these white lefties are returning to North America and Europe disillusioned with their grand schemes of building a raceless society, and are deciding to protect the legacy of what their forbearers stole through rape, enslavement, theft, murder, and war.

Onitaset makes the brilliant insight that what is called RWS by Neely Fuller-ites is actually warfare. Therefore, any approach to solving this problem should be decidedly warlike. Now the definition of warfare is broad and takes many varied methods, from economic warfare, to psychological warfare, and most apparently conventional warfare, which is actually the least effective and most expensive in terms of energy, and manpower. It usually is the last stage of warfare once all other forms have been exhausted or proven ineffective.

I implore Afrikan nationalists, Garveyites, Pro-Blacks, Afrikan Spiritualists, Nationists, and members of the Conscious Community to consider dropping both terms “Racism” and “White Supremacy” and adopting new terms. Kamau Kambon describes it as “white world domination by terror”, others call it ethno-nationalism, I prefer the term white hegemony which I defined in my blog post “Why Mulattoes and other Hybrids are not Afrikan“. It is also in my book, ACBN: A Primer. Onitaset has written a couple of books which I also implore you to purchase, read, and consider their ideas as well. It is abundantly clear that many of the ideas of the last century have failed or been impotent in the face of the dangers we face. With these books and new concepts, it is time to reconsider the approach we are taking to gain power for Afrikan survival and sovereignty.

Article by Lumumba Afrika

R. Kelly: Sexual Predator or Scapegoat?


I anticipate that this post will be unpopular. I acknowledge the contention that my assertions will certainly prompt and welcome the scathing comments in the section below. With that being said, I still very must feel that my perspective is worthy of articulation and exposure to those that care to listen.

Singer and R&B legend R.Kelly made headlines this week for allegedly assembling a sex cult consisting of underaged girls. These allegations bear a disturbing connection to R. Kelly’s previous trouble with the law, portraying Kelly as a an OJ-like figure–a haughty  recidivist who finagled through the loopholes of the American legal system.
I feel obliged to state that I have no respect for R. Kelly as a man. I do however, respect his talent. I perceive the ‘Pied Piper’ as an enslaved black who used America’s need to hyper sexualize the black man as a means to foment his career. While Kelly defiantly made family friendly songs like “Step in The Name of Love” and inspirational songs like “I Believe I Can Fly” and “The World’s Greatest” most of Kelly’s hits are sexualized slow jams to which I’m sure proved background music to the conception of many post millennials. His sexualized image fueled a career spanning over two decades with a plethora of adoring black female fans.

These fans remained loyal to Kelly even after a video surfaced of the singer issuing a golden shower to a then-fifteen year old girl. The charges were eventually dropped and buried in the past of a musician who was still able to maintain his mogul stature despite dramatic changes in the music industry.
While my argument is not to pardon R. Kelly from blame, it is that he is not the primary cause of the hyper-sexualized black female body that faces violation without consequence. R. Kelly was relieved of any legal responsibility in previous allegations of sexually violating a black female teen simply because the black female body bears no significance to the Western world outside of monetary gain. Consider how quickly the western world kills and incarcerates the black body.  The reason why Kelly was not susceptible to these consequences is not because of his riches, but because his “crimes” served an integral purpose in maintaining white supremacy. Moreover, the world was and is more interested in portraying Kelly and his victim as sexual beasts than to upholding the integrity of those they do not see as a human let alone bearing the presumed innocence of femininity or childhood.
To the western gaze, the hyper sexuality of the young black female body violently seduces Kelly. To this same gaze, Kelly is a sexualized being unable to resist the callings of his bestial urges. Together, these caricatured images of black sexuality function assemble the historical narrative of blacks as primitive and underdeveloped beings worthy of the death and incarceration that befalls them.


Kelly, a melanated individual who believes his conventional success consummates his transition to whiteness, feels as entitled to young bodies as the white man did and does to young black females. Kelly, is a symbol of what happens when a morally impoverished black youth offsets a journey to acquire physical wealth and not a collective consciousness. As members of an oppressed collective, it is essential that we proceed with consciousness. To proceed without it, is to inevitably mirror our oppressors in thought and action.

There is also a large possibility that this ordeal is entirely fictional, and yet another means to lynch a black man by the rope of hyper sexuality. But the verity of these accusations does little to supersede its societal function. The scenario depicts how the black man and women are commonly pitted against one another and how the black male is villanized for implementing what he was nurtured to idolize—white male ideology.

The teachings of white supremacy are second nature to anyone not possessing a conscious gaze. I read The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, a few years back and was mortified at what Pecola’s father does to her on the kitchen floor. I resented Morrison for years, holding her in contempt for depicting the black man as indifferently robbing his child of her innocence.

It took me several strides into consciousness to realize that the father was a man systemized and nurtured to become an animal, a subjugate human who performs the dirty work of his master in his oppressed state. This is not an excuse, as his actions are detestable and hard to read, yet even more difficult to process as a factual fate rendered to so many blacks throughout the diaspora silent in the shame of their systemic violation.


Kelly symbolically stands in the same image of this fictional black man who encompasses the factual narrative of so many other black males castrated by earthly demons who program the black body to inflict white evil onto their own people.

Kelly’s actions function to lure black women from blackness into the arms of feminism–yet example of society’s dedication to turning racist issues into sexist issues to further the cyclical disenfranchisement of blacks by hurling our struggle into oblivion. A second offense by a black praised for his prodigious talent, serves another blow to our collective identity alongside similar allegations afforded to other black greats like the late Michael Jackson, Bill Cosby, Kobe Bryant, amongst others. These allegations function to fuel white esteem and denigrate black collective worth in staining the black psyche with portraits of themselves that seemingly lack a moral compass.

So, to those quick to compartmentalize a black man as a sexual villain— I would like to redirect your attention to the words of the late and great Malcolm X:

“If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.”

To what contempt will you hold a system that upholds the systemic soiling of black female bodies?

To reiterate I am in no way excusing Kelly, but evoking a sense of nationalism to assert that we as a collective have been wronged by a system that lures us to incessantly blame ourselves but seldom confront the  true villain and sole benefactor of global racism.

In closing, the power of blackness lies largely in realizing if and when we are being played. So while we may not be playing chess, our systemized state as blacks bears a close resemblance to a king being used to seize the most powerful piece of the game–his queen.

Article by CC Saunders

Mythical Perfection of Eurocentric Beauty

Charlize Theron...

I remember years ago I heard two white men discussing beautiful women.  It was at a former job and they were talking about the prettiest women in Hollywood.  One of them said actress Scarlett Johansson was the hottest.  The other one said he thought actress Megan Fox or Charlize Theron were the prettiest.  And they went back and forth naming actresses like Jennifer Lawrence,Liv Tyler and Natalie Portman. They never mentioned any black women in their discussion.  And why should they?  They’re white men so they are discussing what they find attractive.  It’s only natural for  a man to find his own more attractive than other races.  But I do find it interesting that many times in Hollywood they will give a white woman attention for physical attributes usually associated with black women.  When they talk about women with the most beautiful lips they bring up women like Brigitte Bardot,Sophia Loren or Angelina Jolie.  I don’t get what all the hype is about.  There are countless black women that have beautiful full lips. I see black women on the street everyday that have better lips than Angelina Jolie.  This is one of the reasons you have white women getting lip injections so much today.  They want lips that are pouty and full.  The kind of lips you want to kiss. These white people know deep down that full lips are more attractive than thin lips.  The white media always wants to uplift the beauty of white women at every turn.  That’s one of the reasons I think their beauty is very overrated.

Jennifer Lopez....

The media also loves to praise non-black women for having nice butts.  This has always been a fascinating phenomenon to me.  We all know that white women are known for having flat asses.  When I was high school it was rare to see a white woman with some curvaceous thighs and nice butt.  But ever since actress/singer Jennifer Lopez became big back in’s all they talk about.  Jennifer Lopez and rapper Iggy Azalea even did a song called Booty a few years ago.  How can you have a song about booty without black women???  It’s obvious they want to promote any non-black woman  with black women attributes.  That’s why even though Lopez is Puerto Rican she’s still not  a black woman.  I doubt that Iggy’s butt is real.  And she’s already admitted to breast augmentation. Iggy is a plastic rapping bimbo.   And not a very good rapper at that.  And Armenian no-talent socialite Kim Kardashian has also been praised for having a big butt.  I personally don’t think the her butt is real.  Kardashian and her fame whore sisters are the reason many white women are getting butt implants and Brazilian butt lifts.  The big butt craze has gotten so out of hand even some black women are getting them.  Which I never understood.  Many black women already have nice butts.  But this shows how powerful the media has become.  It’s sad when black women feel they need to compete with something that most of them have naturally.

Bustle Era...

European beauty has always seemed manufactured to me.  It seems like white women have always copied black beauty but denigrate it at the same time.  Back in 1870 there was the Victorian Bustle dress era(pic above).  This dress was very popular with white women. They say it was popular at ballrooms because of the expensive laces and multitude of fabrics.  But the real reason was because the dresses made it look like they had a huge back side.  It made them look more like a woman that had some curves.  And keep this in mind that this was dress popular during slavery.  Most likely their white slave owning husbands were lusting after their African female slaves.  Many of these white women were jealous because their men were sneaking into the slave quarters at night.  So they were resentful of African women and their naturally superior bodies.

Megan Fox....

When I did a google search for “most beautiful women”,I kept seeing the same handful of names. Names like Blake Lively,Jennifer Aniston,Nicole Kidman,Charlize Theron,Megan Fox,Kate Upton,Naomi Watts,Scarlett Johansson and Kim Kardashian.  I was quite surprised that as I researched these “beautiful” women I realized so many of them have had plastic surgery.  There are not too many natural beauties in Hollywood or the music industry.    The pic(above) is of actress Megan Fox and it’s obvious she’s had quite a bit of work done to her face.

Marilyn Monroe....

What about the “classic beauties” like Marilyn Monroe?  Monroe is an iconic film star.  Many regard her as the symbol of white female perfection.  It has been well documented that Monroe had surgery done to her chin and a nose job as well. Well I guess no one is perfect right?

Nicole Kidman....

This is actress Nicole Kidman.  I never found this woman attractive at all.  Her sickly pale skin never turned me on.  She wasn’t even attractive when she was young.  And it looks like she got some lip injections too.  Is she going for that “full lips” look like a black woman has?

Jennifer Aniston...

This is film actress Jennifer Aniston.  I never got the hype about this hideous looking creature.  She clearly ahs gotten a nose job.  And she is not aging well at all.

Blake Lively....

This is film actress Blake Lively.  I’ve heard a lot of white boys say she is the hottest thing since sliced bread.  Which is a good analogy because she is plain as a piece of white bread.  She does nothing for me.  She looks rather plain to me.  Wouldn’t look twice at her on the street.

Scarlett Johansson....

This is actress Scarlett Johansson.  She is mentioned a lot in fashion magazines. They fawn over her all the time.  Some have even compared her to Marilyn Monroe.  They act like she’s the epitome of white beauty. But as you can see a “natural beauty” she is not.

Kim K....

Now if we’re discussing fake plastic can’t leave out Kim Kardashian right?  I know a lot brain dead black men like this no-talent whore but I’m not one of them.  They like her because she sleeps with a lot of black men.  It’s amazing that a woman can do a sex tape and make the cover of high fashion magazines. Only a non-black woman could pull that off.  But Kim has a fake ass as you can see from this picture.  And most likely fake breasts as well.  She’s just a high class whore. Real men who have standards and taste know this.

Bo Derek....

But all this cultural appropriation is nothing new.  It’s been gong on for many years. Even back in the day actress Bo Derek(above) was in the film 10(1979).  In the film she wore braids with beads in her hair.  She’s given a lot of credit for popularizing what we all know is known African hair style.

Kylie Jenner....

And just a few years ago socialite/model/television personality  Kylie Jenner caused an uproar on social media when  she posted a selfie wearing cornrows.  Jenner is not much different than her older attention whore sister Kim Kardashian.  They all seem to love stealing from black culture and have created a $450 million net worth from being wannabe black women.  I have news for these no-talent media women.  Just because you have sex with black men and date them exclusively does NOT make you honorary black women.

Pretty Ladies2....

To put it bluntly…I think white women are seriously overrated.  There are black women that are overweight but so are white women.  When a black woman eats healthy and stays fit…no other race can touch her.  Black women age ten times better than white women and other races as well.  That’s due tot he benefit of melanin. I’ve even had white women tell me personally that they wished they aged as well as black women.  They are secretly envious of the black woman’s body,hair and beautiful skin tone.  The only reason white women are held as the standard is because we live in a white dominated society. Using whiteness as the standard of beauty is just another manifestation of white supremacy. When white women are elevated to the superior position all other races that deviate from that standard and are considered unappealing or unattractive.  Black women should embrace their natural hair and complexion.  There is no need to try to look like European women.  They are too busy trying to imitate black women anyway. A sad imitation at that.   Sistas have an unique beauty all their own.  I leave you with a  poem from  Jennifer Asiedu.  It’s titled About My Black.

“My black is flawless
I’ve never been this proud before
My skin never felt so good
Was I not used to it?
I can’t remember when I loved this shade so much
My color is dark and lovely.
It sings with a rhythmic melody of beauty.

My black is loud
It yelled at this pale-faced lady the other day
She tried to demean my black
And just as quickly as she did
My black screamed back.
My skin roared with elegance
Reminding you it is not afraid anymore

My black is loved
I rubbed it down tenderly today
Making sure to touch every inch.
Ever so gently it glistened and radiated
My black shimmers and still catches attention.
It’s been kissed and hugged
Yet still selfishly wants more

My black is hopeful
I’ve had a freedom that was honestly free
I’ve lived in a time when my black was OK.”

2017 Women’s March: Black Female Perspective


Following Trump’s inauguration a series of Women’s Marches occurred throughout North America. The protests erupted to preserve the female liberties seemingly threatened by a “conservative” president who boasted of sexually assaulting women. As a female, I empathize and even support the initiatives that foment this March. However, although a woman, I know that I am inevitably black first. Thus, I can’t help but feel that by supporting the women’s march is to support the very means of my oppression.

On my a tri-weekly journey to a previous job, I recall seeing a number of protestors outside of Planned Parenthood at the wee hours of the morning seeking to shame female patrons. One protestor stood out from the others—an elderly white man surely north of seventy-five. He stood hunched over, holding an oaktag with a message written in ballpoint pen. I did not bother to read the poster, but judging by the stoic expression on his face, he was there to cast the stones of white male privilege onto the female body. Standing at the intersectionality of race and gender, the black woman knows this gaze all to well. While the literal gaze casts itself onto the black female body countless places throughout North America, the figurative gaze consumes black femininity in its entirety. The women’s march solely speaks to the “woman” component of this gaze, eliminating the most defining characteristic of black female identity.

Reproductive rights in general proves controversial to  the black female trajectory. A quick glance at history reveals that the black female endured sheer deprivation in terms of reproductive rights—her body used as means for mayoral economic franchisement. White women too encompassed an existence that also regarded them as property, however their fair skin warranted privileges denied to the black female body. These exclusive liberties afforded to white women illustrate the concept of “woman” as a privilege solely applicable to non-male whites. Consider the phrasing “black” woman. The label “Black woman” illustrates that black female intersectionality separates black females from the term’s initial meaning. For any “woman” of another marginalized faction, their race or ethnicity always precedes the term woman—proving their genitals deem them female but their race and ethnicity is first and foremost. Femininity is also a privilege extended exclusively to non-male whites. This exclusivity persists as the black female body only earns femininity when adopting western aesthetics and behavior.

Given the exclusivity of the term “woman,” I find it quite disturbing that white women ( and other oppressed groups) call on the black women for support in their times of distress, yet alienate the black female body when their children, brothers and fathers lay slain on the streets or untagged in the morgue. How many white women “said her name” after Sandra Bland was murdered? How many white women were overtly outraged after the Trayvon Martin verdict was rendered?


To take a trip down memory lane, how many white female feminists supported Tawana Brawley in her 1988 trial? If autonomy over the female body is right every woman deserves- why was their no feminist congregation when this young, black girl was sexually assaulted by a number of white men? The answer is simple.  Issues that engage both blackness and femininity become “black” issues instantaneously. This fact reveals that feminism is simply not built to encompass intersectional identities and thereby is not equipped to extinguish black female disenfranchisement.

It seems that former President Barack Obama’s victory disgruntled feminists, who supported this victory as long as it was a symbol of the feminist victory to follow.  It seems feminists felt that history would repeat itself. Namely, black male voting privilege preceded white female voting liberties.  Thus, feminists deemed Clinton’s victory inevitable following Obama’s 2008 victory. Dr. Angela Davis expressed a similar sentiment in the following excerpt from her book Women, Race and Class,

“The representative women of the nation have done their uttermost for the last thirty years to secure freedom for the negro; and as long as he was lowest in the scale of being, we were willing to press his claims, but now, as the celestial gate to civil rights is sIowly moving on its hinges, it becomes a serious question whether we had better stand aside and see ‘Sambo’ walk into the kingdom first.” (Davis 70)

Now that it seems that the black collective has something that the white female collective does not, the bells of white privilege right loudly under the veil of feminism.

Feminism functions to afford white women the same liberties as white men. The main component of these liberties is racism—deeming black female participation in any feminist activity injurious. Thus, to participate in a woman’s march as a black woman is to   march along to the stagnant beat of white supremacy. For the black woman is a queen, but to the western world she will never truly be  a woman.

Article written by C.C. Saunders