Nobody is born a Warrior

Kushite P...

Nobody is born a Warrior.

You choose to be one when you refuse to back down.

You choose to be one when you stand up after getting knocked down.

You choose to be one because if not,who?

Urgent Message: Missing Black girls in Washington D.C.

Where are these black girls?  Who took them?  This is a serious issue!  And it doesn’t seem to be getting much media attention as it should.  It has been on a few Facebook and Instagram accounts.  But this should be getting mass media attention.  But of course if these were little white girls it would be all over the media.  It’s obvious that black lives do NOT matter in Amerikkka.  This should be a huge issue for black men and women.  We must protect our children.  We can’t just rely on racist cops and politicians to help us.  If they can help then that’s fine.  You can let authorities know if you have any information.  But they are still all just extensions of white supremacy.  But at some point we have to do some things on our own.  We need to start policing our own neighborhoods.  And get rid of these rapists,pedophiles and kidnappers among us.  It doesn’t matter if the culprits or black or white.  Or if it’s a man of woman.  The black devils in our community have to be exposed!  I have NO sympathy or patience for those that harm children.  I don’t give a damn what color you might be. It’s time for real warriors to STAND UP!  Black men should be upset right now!  You should be pissed off!  What happen to them?Some say it could organ harvesting. Others say it could be underground sex trafficking. They could be raped or murdered for all we know.

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http://www.blackandmissinginc.com/cdad/

Muhammad Ali,Kobe,Jordan,Mayweather:What makes an athlete great?

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Since the passing of boxing icon Muhammad Ali, I’ve been thinking about black athletes a lot.  Since blacks have been playing sports we have dominated pretty much sport every sport we enter.  I had a recent discussion with a friend of mine.  I asked him why we liked Ali so much.  He said that Ali spoke up for black people at a very unpopular time in America.  He also said that Ali stuck to his convictions even if others disagreed with him.  This is something I hear over and over again.  Of course has Ali got older the white media has whitewashed his image.  They just say he was fighting for civil rights and refused to fight in the Vietnam war due to his religious beliefs.  Ali got a lot of hate from white and black Christians because he was a Muslim.  But there were those that did respect that he did have the right to practice whatever religion he chooses.  But since his death the media doesn’t bring up his controversial views on black power,injustice,interracial marriage and inequality.  They tend to gloss over all that. They do this because many whites feel detached from his era.  They feel that Ali could complain about racism and inequality because of segregation.   That’s why many whites say they admire Ali.  But if you were to repeat some of the things Ali said…they would hate you.  It’s because they believe racism is not a big problem anymore.  Overt racism maybe gone to a degree.  But racism is alive and well.

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Back in the day black athletes at least had the guts to speak out when black people were mistreated.  The photo(above) is from a press conference in 1967.  NFL great Jim Brown held a conference in support of Ali refusing to fight in the Vietnam War. NBA stars  like Bill Russell and Kareem Abdul Jabbar came out to support.  This is why many black people respect these men for speaking out in a show of solidarity with Ali.

What makes an athlete great?  An athlete must have speed,agility,and strength.  Ali seemed to posses all of these qualities.  After years of practice he had perfected the craft of boxing.  Many times he could anticipate the move of his opponent.

Michael Jordan is considered the greatest basketball player of all time.  Jordan had amazing hang time on the court.  He was very quick and could get an easy dunk on pretty much anyone. He was a six time NBA Champion,rookie of the year and 14 time NBA All Star.

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Then there is undefeated boxing champ Floyd Mayweather.  He is a great technical fighter and great defender in the ring.  The brother is a great fighter,you can’t take that away from him. He does come off brash and cocky and that’s one of the reasons people don’t like him. But he really love to show off his money and all the expensive cars he has. He seems to really love showing his opulence at any given moment.  I know that Ali did a picture posing on a stacks of money as well.  And I realize that many whites hate seeing rich and successful black people.  I’m not ignorant of the fact.  But at least Ali did balance his cocky attitude with speaking out on racial and political. Much like Ali,Mayweather   knows many people don’t like it when he does this.  He does  alot of it on purpose to get under people’s skin. I’m all for black people being successful and making money.  Lord knows it’s a struggle to make it in this racist society. But is Mayweather about anything deeper?  I just wish the brother had a little more substance. Does he care about the plight of his people?

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Then you have athletes like Kobe Byant who rarely speak out on race issues. A few years ago NFL great Jim Brown called him out on the Arsenio Hall show. Brown stated:

“He’s somewhat confused about our culture. Because he was brought up in another country…If I had to invite people to that [black athlete] summit all over,” Brown said, referring to a summit held in the early 70s regarding Muhammed Ali’s refusal to fight in the Vietnam War, “there’d be some athletes I wouldn’t call. He’d be one of them.”

I agree with Jim Brown.  Of course Kobe didn’t like that too much so he made a statement

Kobe’s statement:

“It surprised me in the sense that it came out of left field. I’ve never even met him. It came out of left field. But I do think it’s a great opportunity to have this conversation, to have this discussion. No matter where you come from, whether you come from Italy, whether you come from Inglewood (a Los Angeles neighborhood), whether you come from London, it doesn’t matter. Ultimately the conversation is that it doesn’t matter what color skin you are to begin with. But I think it’s a good place to start and have a good conversation.”

“There’s nothing to talk about. We have different perceptions and different views on that, clearly. The thing I’ve tried to do is I’ve tried to educate our youth going forward, no matter what color skin you are, African-American or white or whatever the case may be. Just try to talk about having a bright future going forward and how to help the kids and progress as a society as a whole. He and I, there’s no reason for us to try to have a conversation. We’re on opposite sides of the spectrum. I’m an old dog, but he’s a much older dog and a lot more set in his ways than I am.”

Can you believe this guy? Kobe is living in a fantasy world.  This guy thinks the world is colorblind and racism is not a big issue anymore.  Maybe he thinks this way because he makes millions of dollars,has a Mexican wife and mixed race children. But he needs to come back to reality.  Have you ever heard Kobe speak about the killing of Trayvon Martin? Has Mayweather spoke about the death of Sandra Bland?  Have you heard Michael Jordan speak about the killing of Tamir Rice or Ayiana Jones??  Nope!  Nothing bit silence.  After Ali’s death Jordan released a statement:

“Muhammad Ali was bigger than sports and larger than life. He said he was ‘The Greatest’ and he was right. He was the greatest of his era in the ring and a global icon in sports. I was a kid during his prime, but I remember some of his epic fights and his incredible style. My sincerest condolences go out to his wife, Lonnie, his kids and family.”

You noticed he didn’t say Ali was an inspiration or an example to follow.  It’s because they don’t want to follow his example.  They don’t have the guts and self respect to speak out on behalf of their people. Most of them are just happy to get a paycheck and be athletic coons.

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Although I will give some props to Chicago Bulls player Derrick Rose.  After the racist NYPD choked Eric Garner to death he wore a ” I Can’t Breathe” T-shirt. After he did it many other NBA players did it.

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And after the Trayvon Martin not  guilty verdict NBA star Lebron James got the Miami heat team to wear hoodies in protest.  At least Lebron tried to speak out in some fashion.  What did Kobe Bryant say? This fool actually challenged Lebrons stance.  This is what he said:

“I won’t react to something just because I’m supposed to, because I’m an African American,” he said. “That argument doesn’t make any sense to me. So we want to advance as a society and a culture, but, say, if something happens to an African American we immediately come to his defense? Yet you want to talk about how far we’ve progressed as a society? Well, we’ve progressed as a society, then don’t jump to somebody’s defense just because they’re African American. You sit and you listen to the facts just like you would in any other situation, right? So I won’t assert myself.”

Kobe is a bootlicking sellout for that comment!   Could you imagine Ali making a statement like that?  Never!  This is why Ali is greater than Kobe,Jordan and Mayweather.  You have to do more than just put on a hoodie or t-shirt.  You have to be willing to sacrifice yourself for the greater cause.  Most athletes today have no backbone and are scared of making their white masters angry.  If you want to be an inspiration to your people you must do more than just be a gifted athlete.

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Check out the video above.  Listen to what Ali tells the two white women.  He tells them the truth and they don’t like it!  Could you imagine a black athlete saying those things today?  I can’t think of too many that would.  Some say Ali was just a product of the time.  Maybe so,but we needed someone on his level that had the courage to speak TRUTH to power.  And we still need people like that today.  Our people are still catching HELL in 2016.  Don’t let the media fool you by their whitewashing of Ali’s image.  Ali loved his people and that’s what he will be remembered for the most.  I wish more black singers,athletes,actors and rappers would speak out on our oppression.  That’s what makes someone great in the eyes of their people. What’s greatness?

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Be the greatest at standing for righteousness.

Be the greatest at giving hope to the helpless.

Be the greatest at having courage and dignity.

Be the greatest at having self respect.

Be the greatest at loving your African heritage.

Be the greatest at speaking for those that can’t speak for themselves.

Be the greatest inspiration for your people.

Be the greatest at having compassion but a warrior when the time is needed.

Be great at protecting your family and community.

Be great at protecting the innocent.

Be great at having self confidence.

Be great at having self discipline.

Be a great champion for justice and liberation.

Be great at speaking truth to power.

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Being a great athlete means you have certain God-given abilities. Along with hard work and dedication you can become great at your craft.  Being able to throw a punch,dunk a basketball,run very fast and jump very high….is very impressive. But to be truly great takes a little more than that in my opinion.  And this is why black people will always love and respect Ali.

Rest in Power Ali.

Thomas Sankara-Revolutionary Hero

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Thomas Isidore Noël Sankara (21 December 1949 – 15 October 1987) was a Burkinabé military captain, revolutionary, pan-Africanist theorist, and President of Burkina Faso from 1983 to 1987. Viewed by supporters as a charismatic and iconic figure of revolution.

  • He vaccinated 2.5 million children against meningitis, yellow fever and measles in a matter of weeks.
  • He initiated a nation-wide literacy campaign, increasing the literacy rate from 13% in 1983 to 73% in 1987.
  • He planted over 10 million trees to prevent desertification
  • He built roads and a railway to tie the nation together, without foreign aid
  • He appointed females to high governmental positions, encouraged them to work, recruited them into the military, and granted pregnancy leave during education.
  • He outlawed female genital mutilation, forced marriages and polygamy in support of Women’s rights
  • He sold off the government fleet of Mercedes cars and made the Renault 5 (the cheapest car sold in Burkina Faso at that time) the official service car of the ministers.
  • He reduced the salaries of all public servants, including his own, and forbade the use of government chauffeurs and 1st class airline tickets.
  • He redistributed land from the feudal landlords and gave it directly to the peasants. Wheat production rose in three years from 1700 kg per hectare to 3800 kg per hectare, making the country food self-sufficient.
  • He opposed foreign aid, saying that “he who feeds you, controls you.”
  • He spoke in forums like the Organization of African Unity against continued neo-colonialist penetration of Africa through Western trade and finance. • He called for a united front of African nations to repudiate their foreign debt. He argued that the poor and exploited did not have an obligation to repay money to the rich and exploiting
  • In Ouagadougou, Sankara converted the army’s provisioning store into a state-owned supermarket open to everyone (the first supermarket in the country). • He forced civil servants to pay one month’s salary to public projects.
  • He refused to use the air conditioning in his office on the grounds that such luxury was not available to anyone but a handful of Burkinabes.
  • As President, he lowered his salary to $450 a month and limited his possessions to a car, four bikes, three guitars, a fridge and a broken freezer.
  • A motorcyclist himself, he formed an all-women motorcycle personal guard.
  • He required public servants to wear a traditional tunic, woven from Burkinabe cotton and sewn by Burkinabe craftsmen. (The reason being to rely upon local industry and identity rather than foreign industry and identity)
  • When asked why he didn’t want his portrait hung in public places, as was the norm for other African leaders, Sankara replied “There are seven million Thomas Sankaras.”
  • An accomplished guitarist, he wrote the new national anthem himself

Sankara seized power in a 1983 popularly supported coup at the age of 33, with the goal of eliminating corruption and the dominance of the former French colonial power. He immediately launched one of the most ambitious programmes for social and economic change ever attempted on the African continent. To symbolize this new autonomy and rebirth, he renamed the country from Upper Volta to Burkina Faso (“Land of Upright Man”). His foreign policies were centered on anti-imperialism, with his government eschewing all foreign aid, pushing for odious debt reduction, nationalizing all land and mineral wealth, and averting the power and influence of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank. His domestic policies were focused on preventing famine with agrarian self-sufficiency and land reform, prioritizing education with a nationwide literacy campaign, and promoting public health by vaccinating 2.5 million children against meningitis, yellow fever, and measles. Other components of his national agenda included planting over ten million trees to halt the growing desertification of the Sahel, doubling wheat production by redistributing land from feudal landlords to peasants, suspending rural poll taxes and domestic rents, and establishing an ambitious road and rail construction program to “tie the nation together”. On the localized level Sankara also called on every village to build a medical dispensary and had over 350 communities construct schools with their own labour. Moreover, his commitment to women’s rights led him to outlaw female genital mutilation, forced marriages and polygamy, while appointing women to high governmental positions and encouraging them to work outside the home and stay in school even if pregnant.

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In order to achieve this radical transformation of society, he increasingly exerted authoritarian control over the nation, eventually banning unions and a free press, which he believed could stand in the way of his plans. To counter his opposition in towns and workplaces around the country, he also tried corrupt officials, “counter-revolutionaries” and “lazy workers” in Popular Revolutionary Tribunals. Additionally, as an admirer of Fidel Castro’s Cuban Revolution, Sankara set up Cuban-style Committees for the Defense of the Revolution (CDRs).

His revolutionary programs for African self-reliance made him an icon to many of Africa’s poor. Sankara remained popular with most of his country’s impoverished citizens. However his policies alienated and antagonised the vested interests of an array of groups, which included the small but powerful Burkinabé middle class, the tribal leaders whom he stripped of the long-held traditional right to forced labour and tribute payments, and France and its ally the Ivory Coast. As a result, he was overthrown and assassinated in a coup d’état led by Blaise Compaoré on October 15, 1987. A week before his murder, he declared: “While revolutionaries as individuals can be murdered, you cannot kill ideas.”

On October 15, 1987, Sankara was killed by an armed group with twelve other officials in a coup d’état organised by his former colleague Blaise Compaoré. Deterioration in relations with neighbouring countries was one of the reasons given, with Compaoré stating that Sankara jeopardised foreign relations with former colonial power France and neighbouring Ivory Coast. Prince Johnson, a former Liberian warlord allied to Charles Taylor, told Liberia’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) that it was engineered by Charles Taylor. After the coup and although Sankara was known to be dead, some CDRs mounted an armed resistance to the army for several days.

Sankara’s body was dismembered and he was quickly buried in an unmarked grave, while his widow Mariam and two children fled the nation. Compaoré immediately reversed the nationalizations, overturned nearly all of Sankara’s policies, rejoined the International Monetary Fund and World Bank to bring in “desperately needed” funds to restore the “shattered” economy,[34] and ultimately spurned most of Sankara’s legacy. Compaoré’s dictatorship remained in power for 27 years until overthrown by popular protests in 2014.

Sankara’s visionary leadership turned his country from a sleepy West African nation with the colonial designation of Upper Volta to a dynamo of progress under the proud name of Burkina Faso (“Land of the Honorable People”). He led one of the most ambitious programs of sweeping reforms ever seen in Africa. It sought to fundamentally reverse the structural social inequities inherited from the French colonial order.

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Sankara focused the state’s limited resources on the marginalized majority in the countryside. When most African countries depended on imported food and external assistance for development, Sankara championed local production and the consumption of locally-made goods. He firmly believed that it was possible for the Burkinabè, with hard work and collective social mobilization, to solve their problems: chiefly scarce food and drinking water.

In Sankara’s Burkina, no one was above farm work, or graveling roads–not even the president, government ministers or army officers. Intellectual and civic education were systematically integrated with military training and soldiers were required to work in local community development projects.

Sankara disdained formal pomp and banned any cult of his personality. He could be seen casually walking the streets, jogging or conspicuously slipping into the crowd at a public event. He was a rousing orator who spoke with uncommon candor and clarity and did not hesitate to publicly admit mistakes, chastise comrades or express moral objections to heads of powerful nations, even if it imperiled him. For example, he famously criticized French president François Mitterand during a state dinner for hosting the leader of Apartheid South Africa.

The Divine Masculine Principle

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The Divine Masculine represents an archetypal ideal, the best and most inspiring, elevating, and restorative aspects of masculine expression and manifestation in the universe.

For those seeking an expanded understanding of the Self, the Divine Masculine is not a distant, detached, jealous and vengeful male deity. The Divine Masculine acts as a shining mirror of the Self, revealing aspects that need compassionate attention and support to become one’s highest potential.

As multifaceted, spiritually-embodied beings, we each have a complex psychological and emotional constitution that produces one’s inner health and outer reality. One of the two most fundamental aspects of being is the Divine Masculine archetype.

Each one of us, male and female, carries within our psyche both Divine Masculine and Divine Feminine archetype energies. From these archetypal energies come all our conscious thoughts, plans, desires, goals and agendas. These energies intertwine and cooperate to produce a uniquely personal expression and experience of life. Sexuality is just one expression in which this confluence of energies distinctly manifests. A male gendered body does not mean that only masculine energy is present. Gender (genitals, body) and the archetypal composition of the psyche are independent of each other.

For a man reading this, you may wish to expand your understanding of masculine archetypes and see how these are showing up currently in your life and then consider evoking a more fuller, or “higher” expression into one’s psyche. Men who consciously assimilate Divine Masculine archetype energy express higher levels of awareness and spiritual states of being along with greater satisfaction in life experience. Women reading this are equally served by contemplating Divine Masculine qualities while seeking to integrate these into their inner male expression.

The Sage archetype is a very important aspect of the Divine Masculine expression for our species. The Sage is closely aligned with the Priest archetype, however the Sage emanates an additional aspect of advocating “right action,” dharma. The Sage is the Ego in service to, and “right-relationship” with, the higher Self’s power.

The Sage observes, tracks, scans, monitors data from all sources (within and without) and channels wisdom leading to “right action.” The Sage is detached from ordinary life flow, watching and engaging energies with wisdom and toned action as needed for synchronistic harmony of life.

Being with a man in the fullness of the Sage archetype feels like this: Unheralded, he quietly and deftly shares with others wise counsel and channeled direction that shifts the receiver into new possibilities and pathways that reflect “right action” for their life path. He quietly supports the wisdom of others, not seeking acclaim or notice for his contribution. He is thoughtful and reflective and rests in his felt connection with spirit and grounded connection with the earth, Gaia, the source of his wisdom and insight.

The Sage’s importance comes to the fore during crisis and intense need. Through the uniquely formed conduit that the Sage embodies, wisdom and “right action” become clear. With the Sage’s contribution we feel confident and assured that our path is the right one for us, we respond to life with a calm easefulness that transitions crisis and change with grace and wisdom.

Where the Priest archetype has a primary focus on the “inward” realm, the Sage archetype has an “outward” focus of service —to manifest channeled wisdom into being.

The Warrior archetype is the most represented and exploited archetype in our culture—being elevated and revered by the dominant patriarchal society as: disciplined leader and protector. While these are two of the Warrior’s sterling qualities, it is what comprises his fullness that makes this archetype truly a divine expression.

Warrior qualities include: decisiveness and clarity of thought, selfless service, genuine humility, strength of experiential “knowing,” courage to do what serves the highest good even when it is a personal challenge to do so. He serves to maintain and support established systems and forms consciously, without blind rigidity, being exemplary in loyalty to a greater good beyond personal gain.

He remains calm and centered while under challenge. He is inwardly aligned and integrated—in touch with his feelings, being warm and compassionate, appreciative and generous at every opportunity. He fights “the good fight” in favor of benefiting the greater good and making life more fulfilling for everyone.

Being in the presence of a man in the fullness of the Warrior archetype feels like this: His strength of stature is evident and unheralded—not needing accolades or compliments. He contributes without fanfare or needing to direct or “lord” himself over others. He eagerly responds to requests of service showing respect to all—especially to those “elder” to him, as well as other men, women, children, animals and the earth.

He “knows himself” and finds his place in collaborative projects, being fulfilled and contented with the collaboration and not by ambition or competition. The man in the fullness of the Warrior makes you feel safe while not being oppressed by his stature or protection.