Degrading the beauty of Black Women-Trojan Pam

Lilian Uwanyuze..

In EVERY culture the mother is sacred; the “civilizer” of her culture, community, children, and society.

The black female is the CREATOR of all authentically black life. She is the FIRST TEACHER and her primary responsibility is to “civilize” the children by passing along the values and traditions of her culture to the next generation. The way the female sees herself will determine the way her offspring ultimately SEES, VALUES, and RESPECTS THEMSELVES.

When the white media degrades the black female’s physical features and moral character, they are DELIBERATELY devastating the self-esteem of the products of her WOMB: little black girls and boys who will one day grow up to be low-self-esteemed black men and women.

If the “Mother” of a nation is a worthless whore how can the products of her womb (her children) have any value?

Once the BLACK MOTHER (the black female) is so degraded and demoralized that she becomes “uncivilized,” she will not be able to civilize anyone else. As a result, her children, her men, her community, and the ENTIRE BLACK NATION will become demoralized, self-hating, self-disrespecting, and UNCIVILIZED. This lays the foundation for a ‘Manufactured Black Inferiority Complex’ that will last a lifetime.

Until blacks collectively understand the importance of protecting the IMAGE of the Black Mother of our Black Nation, we will continue reaping one damaged black generation after another.

The African Pledge

African Pledge...

Umoja Karamu- Embrace your Heritage

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Umoja Karamu (oo-MOH-jah kah-RAH-moo) is a celebration of unity within the African-American family, community, and nation. Umoja Karamu is a Swahili term meaning “unity feast.” Many African Americans celebrate this day as an alternative to the national Thanksgiving Day holiday. The unity feast may also be observed during Kwanzaa celebrations in late December.

The concept of African and African-American unity is centuries old. But during the 1960s and 1970s, it was a major focus of black nationalists. During the 1980s and 1990s, Afrocentric scholars such as Ishakamusa Barashango, lecturer, author, and founder of Philadelphia’s Temple of the Black Messiah, drew further attention to the theme.

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Barashango, who died in 2004, argued that African Americans and black people of the diaspora should reject such European-American holidays as Thanksgiving and concentrate instead on understanding Africa’s culture and values that are the distinctive heritage of black people.

In 1971 Brother Edward Simms Jr. of the Temple of the Black Messiah in Philadelphia developed Umoja Karamu to celebrate the African-American family and home. According to Barashango, Simms defined the purpose of Umoja Karamu as “an effort to inject new meaning and solidarity into the Black Family through ceremony and symbol.”

The date for the holiday, the fourth Sunday of November, was established by the Temple of the Black Messiah in Washington, D.C. African Americans in other cities, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Chicago, soon followed the example.

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The celebration is based on five periods of African-American life, each represented by a color.

  1. Prior to Slavery – the color black, represents black families before slavery
  2. In Slavery – the color white, symbolizes the scattering blacks families during slavery
  3. Upon Emancipation – the color red, marks blacks’ liberation from slavery
  4. Struggle for Liberation – the color green, significances the struggle for civil rights and equality
  5. Looking to the Future – the color gold, points celebrants to hope for the future