White Man’s Best Friend-Mythology of Dogs(Part 1 of 3)

Dogs

What is it with white folks and dogs?  They seem to really love their canine friends.  I know black people who have had dogs as pets over the years.  But with white people it’s different.  They seem to have some strange connection with them.  I’ve noticed it more with them than other races.  I’ve noticed it in many films and television shows over the years as well.

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Many say  Europeans love dogs so much because of Roman mythology.  The story of Romulus and Remus. Romulus and Remus were twin brothers. They were abandoned by their parents as babies and put into a basket that was then placed into the River Tiber. The basket ran aground and the twins were discovered by a female wolf. The wolf nursed the babies for a short time before they were found by a shepherd. The shepherd then brought up the twins. When Romulus and Remus became adults, they decided to found a city where the wolf had found them. The brothers quarrelled over where the site should be and Remus was killed by his brother. This left Romulus the sole founder of the new city and he gave his name to it – Rome. The date given for the founding of Rome is 753 BC. Of course this is just mythology but it does make you think. But I have noticed for years there’s been an obsession with wolves and dogs in white culture.

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I found an article about the history of dog ownership.  I found it very interesting and revealing:

“In 2012 South African President Jacob Zuma revealed to the South African people that pet ownership is part of “white culture”. He thinks that the members of ‘the previously oppressed African majority’ who love dogs have a ‘lack of humanity’ and that some people are trying in vain to ’emulate whiteness.’ Concluding that the idea of having a pet is part of “white culture” and that people should focus on family welfare. Though many were offended at the comment made by President Jacob, the president’s office made an attempt to clarify his remarks, saying he was encouraging “the previously oppressed African majority” to uphold its own culture.

In many African cultures, animals served a purpose and did not reside in the homes, nor were they treated how pets are among the Caucasian races. Even in current times in many African households the dog is kept outdoors to protect the home from other scavengers or notify the owners when people were approaching. Many people of African descent will profess today that animals living in a home is unsanitary and many are even opposed to owning dogs. This is not because they are “animal haters” it is just not a normal practice in African cultures. On the other hand you may find that there are more Caucasian dog owners than any race on the earth. This is because the Caucasian people and the dog have a long history together and derive from the same parts of the earth.

Brief History on the relationship of mankind and the dog

“Amid the harsh, icy lands of ancient Europe, early man found himself an unexpected companion — the snarling, carnivorous wolf — which would eventually become his modern-day counterpart’s best furry friend.

The docile wolves bred and stuck with their new human friends. They stopped intermingling as much with the wild wolves. After generations upon generations of selective breeding, wolves slowly became more like the dogs of today.

So when a few of the friendlier wolves started to hang around for leftover mammoth, perhaps the humans didn’t mind because they provided a little extra protection. They began the first step toward domestication by co-existing with wolves in a mutually beneficial relationship, the scientists speculate.”

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The first paragraph above reveals that in Europe, which consists of predominantly Caucasian/Caucasoid or Europid people, the “early man”, of European descent and the furry dog (the fur coat implying the dog was from a colder region), were acquainted in the “icy lands of ancient Europe”. In the 3rd paragraph it reveals that the dog of today were of the friendlier “wolves”. We all know wolves are wild animals and by providing protection to the Europeans reveals that they were also living in the wild, which will be further discussed throughout this article.

The word Caucasian derives from the word Caucasus and Asia. Caucasians (people of the Caucasus Mountains) resided in the hillsides of Europe a region between Europe and East Asia. According to researchers all “modern dogs” DNA traces back to East Asia, Asia divided from Europe by the mountains (Caucasus Mountains) and a great barrier of ice, snow and rock.

Based on the evidence from University of Turku academic Olaf Thalmann’s research, Dr. Zadik’s article examines the idea that dogs could have initially been domesticated in Europe at a time when humans were still hunter-gatherers. Hunter gatherers are a people of a nomadic society who obtained food from wild life and plants, which is how the Caucasian stumbled upon the wild dog and formed a “mutually beneficial relationship”. A dog protects and the “man” provides food, shelter, and comfort.

Dogs, based on their genetic makeup, are not from warmer regions. Even canine creatures such as the hyena that can be found in savannahs, forest edges, and caves of warmer regions derived from Eurasia, where they dwelled for millions of years. African cultures never allowed animals to live in their homes and were only exposed to this type of living when conquered by Europeans who brought with them their “furry pets”.

Black scholar Elijah Muhammad taught that “…the dog stayed in the cave with the family notifying them when other beasts were trying to get in the cave.

He’d (Caucasian man) sit outside of the cave at night in a tree with rocks in his hands and if any beast came up and tried to get in the cave at his family he’d throw rocks or had a club that he would swing down and try to drive it away. He (Caucasian man) was a hairy dog. He had a tail like a dog and a smell like a dog and nothing could get along with him but another dog.

And the dog can eat at the table, lick out the same plate, and white people kiss their dogs on the nose and in the mouth…” (Paraphrasing speech made by Malcolm X)

Though the above statement was ridiculed, claiming to have had a racist connotation, it provides a realistic depiction of the long relationship between white people and the dog which is still apparent to date. It also explains the reason why the Europeans needed protection in the wilderness.”