Seanise Jeffers

Seanise Jeffers..

Seanise Jeffers was born and raised in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Being 22 years old, Seanise is constantly working hard to get her music out to her community in every way she can. She began singing at a very young and now has grown into a beautiful singer with a voice that can never be forgotten. Her singing style is very sweet, crisp, smooth and soft. She is highly anticipated within her community being constantly asked to perform for various events, public and private.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvQd08grQMM
Seanise accompanies her voice with a guitar in which she plays. She performs mostly RnB, Gospel and Pop but she has a taste of different genre’s.

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KRST Unity Center- Kwanzaa Celebration 2017

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Kwanzaa Display..

Just a week ago I went to a Kwanzaa celebration.  It was held at the KRST Unity Center of Afrakan Spiritual Science in Los Angeles.  It is ran by Reverend Dr Richard Byrd and his wife Reverend Erica Byrd.  The center is dedicated to the principles and practices of MAAT. The event itself was free for all to come.  It was nice to see so many black men,women and children having a great time. There was no drama and no fighting .  There were black vendors and musicians that performed.  There was a candle lighting ceremony that highlighted the principles of Kwanzaa. They explained libation and why our ancestors did it. There was a beautiful poem  by poet Tasha Auset.  A rap performance by a young man named Jeremiah Berryman. He was a real talented brother.  He was dropping positive lyrics with no profanity.   There was comedy by Daryl Mooney the son of comedian Paul Mooney. As well as a Kwanzaa play and African dancing. At the intermission the reggae group Fountain of Roots performed. Guest speaker Michael Imhotep from the African History Network had a lecture at the end of the ceremony. I really enjoyed myself.  You could feel the love in the place. It’s nice to be around black people that are comfortable in their own skin.  Everyone I met was really positive.  The vibe was very positive.  But I had such a great time  I thought I would share some of the pictures and videos of the event.

Tony B. Conscious..

This brother(above) is Tony B. Conscious. He’s a very talented rapper and spits positive lyrics.  I was joking around with him the whole night.  He is really cool and a down to earth brother.

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This is Tony’s apparel he was selling at the event.  He not only raps but makes t-shirts,beanies,hats,jewelry and is a painter.  He’s a very talented artist.  This brother does it all!  I bought a beanie and t-shirt from him.

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This beautiful sista is Yendi Serwaa. She is a very talented woman in her own right. She makes all these unique crafts and is also a painter.

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These are some of the products(above) she was selling.  Yendi is also on the Board of Directors at the KRST Unity Center.

Herb and Rev Richard Byrd..

This picture(above) is of Reverend Richard Byrd and Herb Alkhemyst.  Byrd is also known as Meri Ka Ra.  It was a pleasure to meet the elder.  He was a very nice man.  The lovely Alkhemyst is a singer/songwriter and herbalist.

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Koshana Kweli and Kateria Knows also attended the event. Kweli is a spiritual consultant and child care provider. Kateria is an amazing astrologer and creator of the Real Family Reunion. Kateria spoke at the event about the power of purpose.  It was a great speech. They were really cool and down to earth sistas. It was a pleasure to meet them.

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This picture(above) is with Herb Alkhemyst and her sister Kateria Knows.  They’re pictured with Michael Imhotep. He has a blogtalk radio program called African History Network. Imhotep gave a very powerful lecture at the event.  I got a chance to chat with Imhotep for about thirty minutes after the event.  I even bought a few of his dvd’s.

Kateria..

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Fountain of Roots..

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This was their first annual Kwanzaa event.  They say they will do more in the future. I’ll definitely try to attend the event again.  It was just a really nice way to end the year.  Black people talking about black unity,black economics,African culture,black history,black relationships,black unity and black love.  And those are the things we all need to carry on into 2018. ❤

Nahla Ward

Nahla Bee2....

This gorgeous  sun-kissed beauty woman is Nahla Ward. She also goes by the name Nahla Bee.  Nahla is beautiful woman with natural beauty from head to toe. She’s a very talented rapper and singer. Nahla Victoria Ward also know as Nahla Bee was born and raised inDanbury, Connecticut. Nahla Bee is a singer, lyricist and song – writer.
Nahla Bee’s impactful music has reached nations. She has been
recognized by the Huffington Post, HypeFresh Magazine,BuzzFeed
and many more for her musical talent and her memorable image. Nahla
Bee is a recent graduate from Temple University that studied Criminal
Justice and Spanish. Her most recent international engagement was to
Heredia, Costa Rica where she received her certification in Latin America studies, while leaving her musical influence through a live
performance in Spanish. Nahla is well – known for her lyrical content, image, and her musical gifts through her viral social media videos. She has shared stages with
artist such as Wale, Nick Cannon and many more. She has been a
headline performer for the Michelle Obama’s Reach Higher Initiative:
College Signing Day, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia to uplift
and encourage high school students to pursue higher education. She
is most noted for her guest appearance on The Real Talk Show that aired nationwide on Fox News for her viral So Gone Challenge that was millennials to love themselves first
and understand we are all created in God’s image.

Here’s some nice videos(above) by Nahla I thought you would enjoy.  She has a beautiful voice!

Nahla Bee3...

R. Kelly: Sexual Predator or Scapegoat?

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I anticipate that this post will be unpopular. I acknowledge the contention that my assertions will certainly prompt and welcome the scathing comments in the section below. With that being said, I still very must feel that my perspective is worthy of articulation and exposure to those that care to listen.

Singer and R&B legend R.Kelly made headlines this week for allegedly assembling a sex cult consisting of underaged girls. These allegations bear a disturbing connection to R. Kelly’s previous trouble with the law, portraying Kelly as a an OJ-like figure–a haughty  recidivist who finagled through the loopholes of the American legal system.
I feel obliged to state that I have no respect for R. Kelly as a man. I do however, respect his talent. I perceive the ‘Pied Piper’ as an enslaved black who used America’s need to hyper sexualize the black man as a means to foment his career. While Kelly defiantly made family friendly songs like “Step in The Name of Love” and inspirational songs like “I Believe I Can Fly” and “The World’s Greatest” most of Kelly’s hits are sexualized slow jams to which I’m sure proved background music to the conception of many post millennials. His sexualized image fueled a career spanning over two decades with a plethora of adoring black female fans.

These fans remained loyal to Kelly even after a video surfaced of the singer issuing a golden shower to a then-fifteen year old girl. The charges were eventually dropped and buried in the past of a musician who was still able to maintain his mogul stature despite dramatic changes in the music industry.
While my argument is not to pardon R. Kelly from blame, it is that he is not the primary cause of the hyper-sexualized black female body that faces violation without consequence. R. Kelly was relieved of any legal responsibility in previous allegations of sexually violating a black female teen simply because the black female body bears no significance to the Western world outside of monetary gain. Consider how quickly the western world kills and incarcerates the black body.  The reason why Kelly was not susceptible to these consequences is not because of his riches, but because his “crimes” served an integral purpose in maintaining white supremacy. Moreover, the world was and is more interested in portraying Kelly and his victim as sexual beasts than to upholding the integrity of those they do not see as a human let alone bearing the presumed innocence of femininity or childhood.
To the western gaze, the hyper sexuality of the young black female body violently seduces Kelly. To this same gaze, Kelly is a sexualized being unable to resist the callings of his bestial urges. Together, these caricatured images of black sexuality function assemble the historical narrative of blacks as primitive and underdeveloped beings worthy of the death and incarceration that befalls them.

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Kelly, a melanated individual who believes his conventional success consummates his transition to whiteness, feels as entitled to young bodies as the white man did and does to young black females. Kelly, is a symbol of what happens when a morally impoverished black youth offsets a journey to acquire physical wealth and not a collective consciousness. As members of an oppressed collective, it is essential that we proceed with consciousness. To proceed without it, is to inevitably mirror our oppressors in thought and action.

There is also a large possibility that this ordeal is entirely fictional, and yet another means to lynch a black man by the rope of hyper sexuality. But the verity of these accusations does little to supersede its societal function. The scenario depicts how the black man and women are commonly pitted against one another and how the black male is villanized for implementing what he was nurtured to idolize—white male ideology.

The teachings of white supremacy are second nature to anyone not possessing a conscious gaze. I read The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, a few years back and was mortified at what Pecola’s father does to her on the kitchen floor. I resented Morrison for years, holding her in contempt for depicting the black man as indifferently robbing his child of her innocence.

It took me several strides into consciousness to realize that the father was a man systemized and nurtured to become an animal, a subjugate human who performs the dirty work of his master in his oppressed state. This is not an excuse, as his actions are detestable and hard to read, yet even more difficult to process as a factual fate rendered to so many blacks throughout the diaspora silent in the shame of their systemic violation.

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Kelly symbolically stands in the same image of this fictional black man who encompasses the factual narrative of so many other black males castrated by earthly demons who program the black body to inflict white evil onto their own people.

Kelly’s actions function to lure black women from blackness into the arms of feminism–yet example of society’s dedication to turning racist issues into sexist issues to further the cyclical disenfranchisement of blacks by hurling our struggle into oblivion. A second offense by a black praised for his prodigious talent, serves another blow to our collective identity alongside similar allegations afforded to other black greats like the late Michael Jackson, Bill Cosby, Kobe Bryant, amongst others. These allegations function to fuel white esteem and denigrate black collective worth in staining the black psyche with portraits of themselves that seemingly lack a moral compass.

So, to those quick to compartmentalize a black man as a sexual villain— I would like to redirect your attention to the words of the late and great Malcolm X:

“If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.”

To what contempt will you hold a system that upholds the systemic soiling of black female bodies?

To reiterate I am in no way excusing Kelly, but evoking a sense of nationalism to assert that we as a collective have been wronged by a system that lures us to incessantly blame ourselves but seldom confront the  true villain and sole benefactor of global racism.

In closing, the power of blackness lies largely in realizing if and when we are being played. So while we may not be playing chess, our systemized state as blacks bears a close resemblance to a king being used to seize the most powerful piece of the game–his queen.

Article by CC Saunders

Oshun-Sango

No pressure, you don’t have to love me
Just give me some time, just make me feel lucky
When you lay with me night
And when the sun comes up to meet the light
You say that you don’t care
I’m big enough to handle it
Just play in my hair and kiss me while the candles lit
Your secrets safe with me and I won’t tell
I don’t mind if you hurt me it’s my own fault that I fell
And I tell myself I need you, but you don’t feel the same
And double standards taught me I should let you play the game
But I’m not ashamed of playing the fool
Just call me beautiful
You tell me things like you’ll leave her when we both know that’s not true
And make promises of the things we both know you won’t do
Boy it’s cool, I’ll crumble alone
And you gone live your life and only fuck when in the zone
And yeah you make me moan
I put you on a throne; you won’t pick up your phone
But baby you make me feel grown
So I persist to give you everything you want
Even though you kept it real with me and you been blunt
Saying that we won’t be together and this is only lust
And never equals never
I’m on the same page as you
There’s nothing that I can explain to you
To show you why

Oshun...

I just keep on giving
I cannot keep living for you
Got my mind spinning round
You gon’ let me drown
But I’m sick of falling
I wanna rise to love
Rise to love
Rise

(Verse 2)
A weak woman goes where she is smiled at
But I’ve never seen a smile quite like yours
Said he loves me, he loves me not
Well he’s not sure but he knows he wants me
Yeah he said I’m making him hot hot hot
And so I let him take my top off
I don’t know thinking maybe things will pop off
Or sparks from the physical signals to his mental for a certain type of spiritual relationship
But, he just want the rhythm of my hips
Placing seldom kisses upon my lips
You know that quick fix satisfaction
Bridging to nowhere, a fatal attraction
Like whoa there, why did we go there so fast?
We knew that purely matter never ever last
Now morning glass outside looking in
While your bragging bout my ass to your friends
And I know this all begins with my issues with men
That’s why

(Chorus 2)
I keep on defending
The fact that I’m depending on you
I know it’s true that
A weak woman goes where she is smiled at
But I’ve never seen a smile quite like yours
Whether you love me or love me not
I’ll adore you forever more

(Chorus 1)
And I’ll just keep on giving
I cannot keep living for you
Got my mind spinning round
You gon’ let me drown
But I’m sick of falling
I wanna rise to love
Rise to love
Rise

Natasha Malone

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Natasha  Malone is an actress and singer. She is  known for Lorenzo & Monica (2012), C.E.O. (2014) and Till Death Do Us Part (2004),Deadly Affairs(2014) and Criminals at Work(2016). She sings under the name Breezy Malone.

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