Africans must unite against injustices

africa

As a direct descendant of the Xhosa Kingdom—the royal nation of Kings and Queens and Priesthood. We take pride in our history. There was a time when we made a public mockery of the most powerful military power in the world, the British Empire. We won victories and embarrassed them before the entire world. Our ancestors understood that the  object of war is to preserve oneself and destroy the enemy. The destruction of the enemy is the primary object of war and self-preservation the secondary, because only by destroying the enemy in large numbers can one effectively preserve oneself. What is more, our blood cousins, the Zulu Kingdom  completely smashed the British army in the Battle of Isandlwana in 1879. But what led to our downfall was DISUNITY and TRUSTING the wrong people.

It’s this foolish behavior we see in black America. Appealing to the morality of the very people who oppressed, raped female slaves en messe, castrated thousands of black males and systematically enslaved them under the most cruel and wicked system ever imposed on a people. How can you integrate yourself with a group of people who amassed great wealth and obscene privileges through the blood, sweat and tears of your ancestors and continue to do so?

africa-unity

The 60’s Civil Rights movement led by Dr. King, a white-minded integration seeker and other integration seekers who were all subsidised and controlled by white liberal and the federal government who were not in black revolution but worked against the black revolution. Brother Malcolm X described it as “artificial fires that have been ignited and fanned by the white liberals in the desperate hope that they can use this artificial fire to fight off the black revolution.”

Today, we find American Blacks’ livelihoods worsened  and according to Michelle Alexander “It is perfectly legal to discriminate against criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans… .As criminal, you have scarcely more rights, and arguably less respect, than a black man living in Alabama at the height of Jim Crow” (pg. 235). It also came to my understanding that the Civil Rights legislation passed in the periods between 1860s and 1870s were much stronger than those in the 1960s and 1970s and thus, newly freed African slaves made many gains which surpassed, in many instances, the political gains  Blacks made in 1960s and 1970s (Dr. Amos. Wilson, pg. 12).

Today, we find Africans sit in the table and talking negotiations with the very people who took their ancestral land and committed atrocities among their own people. The South African government is yet to make a statement concerning the land in white hands. Most African governments have been hypocritical in regards to the land in white colonial terrorists’ hands.
When Africans are being killed in the streets of America through intense racial profiling, robbed of their dignity and recognition as human beings, cheated on their ancestral lands in Africa, being given the most inferior quality of education, housing, health care services, being discriminated in the workplace, and criminal justice system and when we say Africans should do something to protect and defend themselves, they say you are teaching hate and advocating violence. They didn’t say get nonviolent when Osama Bin Laden bombed the Twin Towers. They don’t call it nonviolence when the U.S. government bombed  both Libya and Syria.

Africans both in America and in Africa can extract themselves from this heinous repressive system that is kept in place through intimidation and emotional terrorism, if they desire to be free,  independent and in control of their destiny. Our ancestors couldn’t take it any longer. They didn’t have much but they fought back. I never understood the logic behind nonviolence and ‘peaceful’ protests, could there be a reason why the media and academia wants us to worship Dr. King, Gandhi and Nelson Mandela while ignoring people like Malcolm X, Patrice Lumumba, Steve Biko, and Huey P. Newton? The obvious reason for this is to make ourselves martyrs in the name of non-violence, while it is far better to make martyrs of the ruling class and police thugs.

 

Pan African Proclamation of 2016

RBG Man...

Hotep family! It’s your brother KP.  I hope everyone is doing well.  I enjoyed my little break from posting. I thought this would be a good post for my return. Here at Kushite Kingdom I have always promoted  the idea of being Pan African. As well as covering topics like Black consciousness,economics,African culture and Black liberation. In exposing the lies that we are told about our history, I’ve tried my best to wake up my people. Many of us get so much disinformation in the media we are very confused.  That’s why I do my best to get out important information to my people. Even if I offend other races in the process. Offending people is not my concern.   If I was scared to offend others I would’ve stop blogging a long time ago.The survival of my people is my main concern.  I have always believed  that black consciousness was a spiritual path based on health,wellness amd knowledge of self. Black consciousness is appreciation for our African heritage,our people and families. And real  power is about determination and self control.  You can call this a proclamation,manifesto,mission statement or public declaration.  But I just wanted to list some ideas and things we as black people should be doing if we want to survive as well as change our mindset.  We have a lot of work ahead of us.  But together we can do this.  I’m sure some of you will like some of it…and others will disagree.  But that’s okay. I’m open to any suggestions anyone may have.

Pan African Flag..

  1. Promote Black Love
  2. Reject ideologies that have European origins
  3. Do not celebrate European holidays(White Gods)
  4. Learn a trade or skill to empower your people
  5. Teach African culture and Black History to your children. And how it can be used as an instrument of Power
Books
6. Study biology and genetics. Learn about your African bloodline.
7.Accept the harsh reality that biracial people are not black
8.Realize that you must sacrifice so that others can be free
9. To live with honor and integrity
10. Must understand that healing means we no longer allow trauma to control our lives
11. Do not engage in sexual activity with non-blacks
12. Stand for justice and equality
Heroes...
13. Learn about great African heroes such as Marcus Garvey,Nat Turner,Queen Nzinga,Shaka Zulu,Thomas Sankara,Steve Biko,Harriet Tubman,Dutty Boukman,Patrice Lumumba,Martin Delany,Edward Blyden,Alexander Crummel,Assata Shakur,Mansa Musa,Malcolm X and Jean Jacques Dessalines. Appreciate their greatness but also learn from their mistakes.
14. Read The Blueprint for Black Power by Amos Wilson(then get all his books)
15. Read The Destruction of Black Civilizations by Chancellor Williams(then get all his books)
16. Read books by black scholars such as John Henrik Clarke,Queen Afua, Kwame Ture,Marimba Ani,Jewel Pookrum,Dr Sebi,Umar Johnson,Llaila Afrika,Bobby E.Wright …among others.
17. Reject European standards of beauty and uplift African Beauty
Black woman..
18.Trust your ancestors and your instincts
19. Support Black businesses
20.Learn how to fish and hunt
21.Grow your own food
22.Learn to speak and write an African language
23.Learn how to read a map and use a compass
24.  Don’t be violent towards black homosexuals,transgenders and lesbians. Live and let live.  But realize that it is not conducive behavior for African people.
25.Understand that homosexuality,bestiality,lesbianism and pedophilia is sexual perversion.
Tomiko..
26. Do not be slut or whore.  It is very self destructive  and shows your immaturity. This applies to women….and men.
27. Assume that all non-blacks do not have your best interest in mind.
28. Brothers: Do not display a misogynistic mindset. Hating and despising black women shows ignorance and no growth as a man.  You must learn to respect your woman. Let sistas express themselves although it is okay to disagree at times. But give sistas their space.
29. Sistas: Do not be a man hating feminist.  Do not put down or degrade your man. Use words of encouragement to uplift your man.  And realize that men want to be leaders. Every gender has their role and should compliment the other gender.  A relationship is a partnership that both can benefit from.
30.  You must realize that the masculine principle  and feminine principle compliment one another. And that black men and women must work together to strengthen the family unit.