Colin Kaepernick(Kappa Alpha Psi)- Boule Negros and Fake Black Consciousness

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The picture above is of NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick receiving the Muhammad Ali Legacy award from Sports Illustrated.  He was presented the award by singer Beyoncé this past Tuesday.  The event was the 2017 Sportsperson of the Year Awards in New York. I did a post about a year ago stating that the Kaepernick protest was all staged.  It was staged by the European elite who control the NFL. Colin is not about black liberation.  He is there to confuse black people into thinking he’s fighting for them.  It was to cause more racial division/tension and distract the masses of Americans.  He helped to distract people from a possible war with North Korea a nd also the fact that many of out civil liberties are being taken away.  Two things that always get a person’s attention: Sex and Race.   I don’t think many black people realize how much of this is orchestrated.  What you see in the mainstream media is all filtered for your eyes.  The “Kaepernick operation” is no different.

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This photo(above) is of Muhammad Ali in Africa back in 1974.  When he had the Rumble in the Jungle fight.

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Now look at this recent photoshoot of Colin for GQ magazine.  He took this picture in Harlem.  Wearing a dashiki???  Hmmmm….that looks familiar.

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This is a great video(above) by Black Child.  He is really good at decoded signs and symbols used in movies and television shows.  In this video he exposes the fact that Colin is a fraud.  Colin is in the college fraternity Kappa Alpha Psi.  These fraternities are controlled by the Jewish/white elite.  If you join the fraternity they allow certain black and biracial people to get attain fame and fortune.  Some of the familiar names are men like Cedric the Entertainer,Arthur Ashe,John Singleton,Oscar Robertson,Bill Russell,Stan Lathan,Vernon Jones,Marc Lamont Hill,Tavis Smiley and yes even Johnnie Cochran.

http://www.lakappaalphapsi.org/fraternity/notable-kappas/

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I did the post in the hope that black people can truly raise their consciousness.  I’ve seen  a lot of black people on Facebook and Twitter calling Kaepernick a hero.  Apparently a lot of our people think they’re “woke” by appearing to be pro-black.  But they’ve bought into the deception they’ve been given.  Colin is nothing but controlled opposition.  He is own and controlled by the very people many people think he’s fighting against.  He speaks about racism and police brutality.  But he answers to the very same people that are the most racist.  All his activism is an act. This biracial dude has so many of you fooled.  Many of you really think he’s about black pride,black power and being Afrocentric. Going around sporting an afro and wearing dashikis.  But I’m not falling for it.  I’m hip to the game. I know this is hard for many to accept. Black people always look at things at face value.  But when you’re in a war you have to look beneath the surface.  It’s important that we use our critical thinking skills when examining white supremacy.  White supremacy is very refined at the moment.  The best way to combat a movement is to control yourself.  Colin protesting the national anthem is no different than the white-controlled Black Lives Matter movement.  Some people say it’s important to know who are your real friends.  Others say you should keep your enemies close.  I think it’s also important to know who acts like a friend but is an undercover enemy. The type of low life snake plotting your downfall or leading you down a path of destruction.

Ebonee Davis

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Model Ebonee Davis is one of the biggest rising stars in the fashion industry. She’s starred in massive Calvin Klein campaigns, graced the pages of Sports Illustrated: Swimsuit Edition, walked in countless shows and been featured in countless magazine spreads.

But it wasn’t exactly an easy journey to success, nor does she find her career perfect now. In a powerful, must-watch TED Talk, the 23-year-old model detailed the pervasive racism she’s experienced in the industry, concluding with an uplifting screed on Black Girl Magic.

Davis starts out by describing how she began relaxing her hair at the age of four, convinced by the media and the world at large that what she already had wasn’t beautiful. “To be born Black in America is to be born into a world that makes you feel inferior before you can even take your first step,” she said. “It is to be under constant spiritual and mental attack.”

She detailed moving to New York from Seattle as a teenager to model, where people in the industry frequently asked “where she was from.” She told them she was from Seattle.

“I figured that once I got a contract, the industry would open up for me,” Davis said. “But at every turn, I was met with resistance. I had white agents with no knowledge of Black hair care run their fingers through my hair and tell me things like, ‘We already have a girl with your look.’ Translation: All Black girls look the same.”

She was hurt by agents telling her, “We just don’t know what to do with you.” Her face was “painted grey” by makeup artists, stylists burned and pulled out her hair to the point where she “had to start over,” and she was discouraged from wearing her hair natural (she did it anyway).

“I was told not to work for publications like Essence and Ebony magazines, because if I got labeled an ‘urban model,’ the fashion industry would close its doors to me,” she said. She appeared in the March issue of Essence. Her career is bigger than ever.

Despite everything she’s gone through, Davis continues to rise in the industry, and due to her fame and success, she has a powerful platform to speak out about inclusion (she does not want to be the one Black model, checking some kind of box, but rather see representation across the board).

“Despite the great injustices we face as Black women, we can, and have, and will rise out of the ashes, and become examples of resilience, drive, and excellence,” she said. “I like to call this Black Girl Magic. And with this magic we are creating our own publications, we are creating our own television shows. We are creating our own narrative.”

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Adaora Akubilo

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Adaora  Akubilo is a 28-year-old Nigerian US-born model. Born in Windsor, Connecticut, Adaora had a remarkable experience growing up in Nigeria as a teenager. On relocating to U.S.A, acclimatizing was not easy as this presented its seething challenges.

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While in High School, she was approached by a model scout from John Casablanca. This is how her foray into modeling started. She featured in “Sports Illustrated 2012 SwimSuit Issue”, thus making her rookie debut in the 2012 Issue. She is a true African beauty!