Perverting the Minds of Children-Mwalimu Baruti

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“The most important targets in this move to escalate the introduction of perverted,insane ideas into our minds are children. You change who a people are through altering their children,gradually generation after generation.  And because of their innocence and impressionability,our children’s minds are the most fertile soil for the introduction and successful implantation of perverted European ideas.  As they grow,those insanities that they have assimilated as normal and natural becomes what they believe they are.”

Quote by Mwalimu Baruti (picture above is actress Charlize Theron and son,Jackson)

Organ Harvesting: It’s a Global problem!

Since the abduction of black girls recently  in Washington DC,people have asked me what happened to them.  A subject that keeps coming up is organ harvesting. I think this is serious problem for black people.  I think there are very powerful people kidnapping black children and adults for their organs. This is a very scary issue that some people don’t want to touch on.  Even in the horror film Get Out is shows black people being abducted and being used for their organs.  Not too many realize that Hollywood was showing what they already do.  Are black people paying attention? I hope so. Art imitates life right? And many people aren’t aware that this is a global problem.  It is really big on the black market.  It’s not only big in America but also India,China and Jamaica.  The video(above) is a Jamaican doctor.  He explains how much of a problem it is in Jamaica. Here’s an article from the Kulture Kritic about organ harvesting:

In a 2006 article, USA today estimated that more than 16,800 families had been represented in lawsuits that claimed that their loved ones’ body parts had been stolen for profit over the course of the previous 19 years. The estimate was based on data from federal and local investigators, lawsuits and public organizations such as medical universities.

David Matas

The lucrative business of illegally harvesting and selling organs and body parts without consent does not appear to have slowed down since then. The World Health Organization estimates that as many as 7,000 kidneys are illegally obtained by traffickers every year. Other organs such as hearts, lungs and livers and human tissue such as bones, tendons and other body parts are illegally harvested all over the world for transplant, research and education.

The illegal harvesting of organs and tissue from Black men, woman, and children who are kidnapped and murdered is not covered widely in the mainstream media and is many times written off has more of a conspiracy theory than fact. However, there are several cases that prove that illegal organ harvesting from Black people is happening, not just in other countries, but right here in the United States.

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In 2008, former dentist Michael Mastromarino was indicted for stealing more than 1,000 bodies in order to sell body parts and tissue. Michael Brown of Murrieta, California kept bodies that he was supposed to have cremated and sold them for more than $400,000. These men and others who participate in the illegal harvesting and trade of body tissue leave many families without answers about what happened to their family members organs and/or body parts.

 

The illegal harvesting of organs from Black people seems to be more sinister due to the fact that organs must be harvested not long after death for them to be viable for transplant. This leads to cases where families have trouble finding answers about the mysterious circumstances their family members died under.

One such case is that of 14-year-old Jason Smith in Eros, Louisiana whose death was ruled an accidental drowning despite the fact that his organs were missing when his body was found. A case that received more attention but did not provide the family with any more answers is that of 17-year-old Kendrick Johnson whose death was initially ruled to have been the result of accidental suffocation. A second autopsy yielded a different conclusion, but when the second autopsy was performed, his body had been stuffed with newspaper, and his organs were missing.

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More recently in September 2014, 24-year-old Ryan Singleton’s body was found in a California desert with his eyes, heart, lung, liver and kidneys missing. Singleton’s mother believes that his organs were stolen because the rest of his body remained in tact, meaning the organs had not been eaten by animals.

As the disparity between supply and demand for organs  continues to be insurmountable, authorities are considering rewriting the 1984 law that bans the sale of organs, but in the meantime, the World Health Organization estimates that a human organ is illegally sold every hour, and families all over the world are left without answers about their loved ones death’s and burials.

Missing women....

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Here’s some information taken from Selfuni’s WordPress blog:

64,000 African-Americans girls are reported missing, but nobody’s looking for them.  Why?

Despite representing 12.85% of the population, black Americans accounted for nearly 226,000 — or 34% — of all missing persons reported in 2012. According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center, the comparison with other racial groups is unfavorable: Whites and Hispanics are a combined 80.1% of the population, but account for 60% of missing persons.

This is especially troubling when you break down the numbers by age. Black and Missing reports that 37% of missing minors and 28.2% of missing adults in 2013 were black. No fewer than 270,000 minorities have gone missing since 2010, 135,000 of whom were black and 64,000 were black women, according to the Atlanta Black Star.

Essence points to a 2010 report titled “Missing Children in National News Coverage,” which found that while black children accounted for 33.2% of missing children that year, the media exposure rate was an unimpressive 19.5%. While black men go missing at statistically higher rates, coverage of black female disappearances is particularly telling in light of the attention similar stories get when white women are involved.

“In the field, I’ve seen a majority of black missing children classified as runaways, who don’t get Amber Alerts.”

From Identies.Mic

Medical History

No way the same US government and media that gave so much attention to 2-300 Nigerian girls would ignore 64,000(!) its own, unless there was a reason.  The most likely reason is organ harvesting, and the  skin is the body’s biggest organ.  Considering America’s dark history of medical exploitation of Blacks, this isn’t as far-fetched as it seems at first.

First of all, there’s a long history of medical research using unwitting/unwilling African-American women for medical experiments:

on the 19th century medical plantation—a locality spatially separate from the agricultural plantation—black women’s bodies were imagined as the ideal test subjects of research and innovation within what became modern gynecology.

http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/3248/3184

That trend has continued from Emancipation until today, at the GOVERNMENT level: ”

throughout their long history in the USA, African-Americans have been secretly used as guinea pigs for medical experimentation by various American governments

http://newafricanmagazine.com/medical-scandal/#sthash.YEwwEi19.dpuf

It’s a MARKET. The medical industry cannot advance without unwitting/unwilling Black subjects. Cells secretly harvested, and later cultivated from a Black woman are the source of ALL cells used for medical research- vaccines, cloning, testing, etc. “This represented an enormous boon to medical and biological research” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henrietta_Lacks

Was Fidel Castro a friend to Africans?

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The Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro passed away on Friday 25th November. I am not going to provide an account of the Cuban Revolution, rather I just wanted to pay a brief, but heartfelt tribute to Castro, without deifying him or pretending that he was perfect, which is a common tendency when people write about people they admire. Why do I admire Castro? Is it because I am a Communist or Marxist revolutionary? No, certainly not. I admire him because he was one of the few true friends, in terms of significant political leaders, that Afrika has had during the 20th century. Whilst some of the Afrikan leaders of the ‘frontline states’, during the apartheid era in South Africa,  either sat passively by or in some cases, actively co-operated with the apartheid regime, such as the arrogant neo-colonial lackey Dr Hastings Banda who “… was careful never to appear radical in front of the former colonial masters and pleased the British government by maintaining trade and contact with South Africa, condemning his fellow African leaders more than he did apartheid.”  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/obituary-dr-hastings-banda-1296534.html  Fidel Castro put Cuban forces into battle against colonial regimes in South Africa, Namibia, Mozambique and Angola. Much Cuban blood was shed on the battlefields of Southern Africa in aid of Afrikan liberation.
A great example is the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale. “The battle of Cuito Cuanavale and the Cuban intervention in Angola is one of the turning points in Southern African History. It led to the movement of powerful Cuban armed force, into the west, towards the Namibian border. The fighting in the south western part of Angola led to the withdrawal of the South African, ANC and Cuban presence in Angola, and to the Independence of Namibia.”  http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/battle-cuito-cuanavale-1988 This battle was hugely significant in that it not only led to the withdrawal of South African troops from Angola and independence of Namibia, but it also destoyed the aura of invincibility surrounding the South African Defence Force (SADF), and was a  significant contributory factor in the release of Nelson Mandela and end of apartheid in South Africa.

You have to put this all into context by remembering that the white world vacillated between overt and covert support for the apartheid regime, as perhaps best exemplified by UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher referring to the Afrikaners as “our kith and kin” during a state visit to the UK by the then South African leader, the despicable war criminal, PW Botha. In global terms Cuba is a small island nation with a small population and which has been under economic and political attack by the United State ever since the revolution in 1959. Over the years there were more than a dozen documented assassination attempts against Castro by various US governments and yet despite living in the shadow of a hugely powerful; hostile neighbour, Castro had the vision and commitment to reach out to African people in Afrika, the Caribbean and other parts of the world and lend direct practical military, economic and medical aid. Just take the example of the massive earthquakes in Haiti where Cuba sent teams of doctors and the US sent in hordes of soldiers. That is a direct legacy of Fidel Castro and also illuminates the Euro-American mindset of always coming to conquer. Cuba even offered to send in medical teams in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina whilst the US government once again sent in teams of soldiers to face down a non-existent threat from the stranded, mostly Afrikan residents of New Orleans. Over the years Cuba has run a program giving free medical training to African-Americans.

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Castro should also be remembered for his strenuous attempts to wipe out racism in Cuba. I should be clear that he did not succeed in this, but it was not for the want of trying. Racism is still alive and kicking in Cuba as you can see by the behavior and attitudes of many of the European Cubans who migrate to the US from the island. Since, as I have mentioned many times before, racism is a normative part of European culture, all Castro could do was to suppress overt manifestations of racism in Cuba, but he could never kill its cultural root. I recall an Afrikan woman telling me of her holiday to Cuba, which took place in the last 10 years, and how she was constantly asked for her ID on the private beach associated with the hotel she was staying in and how it was regularly insinuated that she was a prostitute. You also have all of the skin color and shade issues in Cuba as is found in places such as Jamaica, UK, US etc. as well as the same European beauty ideal.

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Human Rights – We have to speak about human rights because this will be the biggest criticism made of Castro.  Did the Castro government suppress people’s human rights? To my mind the answer is obviously yes, however I think again we have to look at this in context. What do you think is going to happen when you lead a  tiny nation with the most powerful nation on Earth as a very hostile near neighbor which is  making every attempt to not only overthrow your government but also to directly kill you? It would be naive to think that you can have an open society under such abnormal conditions. Just take the failed ‘Bay of Pigs’ invasion in 1961 as an example of US hostility  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-13066561  No one knows for sure how Cuba would have developed if it was not faced with the ongoing US economic embargo designed to impoverish the Cuban people and destabilise the Cuban government.

The Future – With the transition of leadership to Fidel Castro’s brother Raul in 2008, the lifting of the US economic embargo and the flow of US money into Cuba which will become a tidal wave, the future for Cuba is likely to be Back to the Future. Prior to the revolution Cuba was a playground for the rich and famous from the US, a place where the Mafia could launder money and  centre for gambling, drugs and prostitution. I predict that in 5-10 years Cuba will be transformed. There will be huge infrastructure investment in the key tourist areas with hotels, casinos, theme parks etc popping up and a massive spike in property prices in these areas. Cuba will become one of the top holiday destinations for US citizens and will become a hotspot for sex tourism. Some Cubans are going to make  significant amounts of money, whilst the US transnational corporations are going to make a killing. Cuba will become yet another neo-colonial island in the sun.

Article written by Ifayomi Grant

Nandi Mngoma

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Nandi Mngoma was born on March 20,1988.  She is one of South Africa’s most well loved celebrities. An enormously talented musician and actress who has already worked with a host of big brands both locally and internationally, it is perhaps Nandi’s humble perspective on her celebrity status coupled with a professionalism and inner drive to use her influence for the greater good, that sets her apart.

Nandi has a true appreciation for her massive fan-base and takes seriously the effect role models have – especially among young South African women who follow her life daily on social media. An advocate for being comfortable in your own skin and celebrating
your uniqueness, her wide appeal is of a quintessentially positive nature. An example of this is Nandi’s signature short afro hair, which
has inspired many women to wear their hair naturally and forgo weaves and the like.

A shrewd businesswoman who has enjoyed numerous successes in her glamorous career to date, Nandi is also passionate about celebrating African women and encouraging them to follow their dreams. Equality and education are two of her passion points because of the ultimate freedom and success they can enable. Nandi therefore relishes opportunities to endorse and support such worthy causes.

An undeniable talent in the entertainment industry is certainly a key dimension of the Nandi Mngoma brand. Her ease with being in the spotlight started from a young age, with Nandi winning Miss Junior South Africa at age 8. Numerous wins at various regional and national dancing and singing talent shows followed during her early teens until her first TV gig at age 15, when Nandi landed a presenter spot on SABC 2 kids show called Bling!, which she did for the next 2 years.

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During that time she also made appearances in various magazines and newspapers and accepted an opportunity as a Woolworths ambassador, MC’ing for their campaigns. A few other TV appearances later, Nandi featured as a vocalist on the hit single “Tonight” by DJ Franky in 2011. The video includes appearances by DJ Fresh and Nonhle Thema and has played on various national radio stations and SABC 1’s Live, Club Culture, Channel O, CrazE, MTV Base and Soweto TV. The hit single also made the charts for Ukhozi FM, Gagasi FM, Metro FM, Kent’s Ultimix and No.1 on Euphonik’s My House 5FM respectively.

In 2012, Nandi signed with Universal Music and released her self-titled Debut Album “NANDI”. Tracks from this album feature on DJ Kent’s album and the track titled “Good Times” has recently been remixed by Zakes Bantwini. Following her departure from Universal, Nandi has been back in the studio for a number of exciting projects – one of these was her hugely popular duet entitled “Dance” with Zakes Bantwini last year. Launched on Freedom Day, 27 April, the inspiration for the track was to get Africans to unite in song and dance. 2015 also saw Nandi link up with K.O from SA’s Cashtime Life crew, for the super catchy hip-hop come R&B ballad
“Skhanda Love”, which included a cool story-based music video.

Lerato Kganyago

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Lerato Kganyago was born July 22,1982. Kganyago is a South African television presenter, model, businesswoman and socialite best known for hosting her own talk show on Soweto TV called The LKG Show; and for hosting the SABC1 lifestyle magazine show The Link.

She first entered the public eye in 2002 when she was crowned Miss Jam Alley 2002. She was also a finalist in the Miss City Press contests in 2003 and 2005 and was crowned Miss Soweto in 2005.

She started her schooling at Ipolokeng Primary school and later went to Boksburg High School were she matriculated. She then studied a Diploma in Travel and Tourism, and Public Relations with Damelin College.

Kganyago featured on the popular drive time show on Jozi Fm, with DJ Hluks, as an entertainment news updater. She also hosted a car show on the same slot, updating listeners about the latest cars and celebrities that drive them.

Kganyago had her first television appearance on the Phat Joe Show, as an actress in comedy skits. She then shot a number of TV adverts for major campaigns including Ukhozi FM, Botswana TV, Castle Lite and J&B.

After being a presenter for a number of years on the community TV station Soweto TV (2008-2012), she was thrust into the public eye in late 2012 when SABC1 dropped Bonang Matheba as host of The Link and hired Lerato to fill the vacancy.

In 2010 she had a small role in the e.tv drama series 4Play: Sex Tips for Girls. She has also had cameo roles on Live (she co-hosted the show with Crazy Lu), the mini-series After 9 on SABC1 and The Wild on M-Net.

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In 2015 she joins SABC2 soapie Muvhango in the role of Mmasebotsana Primrose Mojalefa, a beauty and a businesswoman. She makes her debut on Thursday, 11 June 2015.

Lerato was also a partner in the FTV (Centurion) franchise and she owns Black Angel, an events management company. As an MC, Kganyago has secured ongoing deals with the Gauteng Department of Education, Revlon, Face of Jawad Products in Lesotho, Tropica, Always Ultra Campaigns and Silver Star Casino. She also hosts music festivals.

In a 2008 interview with City Press she admitted to suffering from the eating disorder anorexia in her early twenties. She is the niece of SABC spokesman Kaizer Kganyago.

In April 2016 she replaced Pearl Thusi as the co-host of SABC1 music show LIVE Amp.

Nomzamo Mbatha

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Nomzamo Mbatha is a South African actress television personality who first came to public attention as one of the three finalists in the 2012 MTV Base VJ Search and in 2013 she was cast in IsiBaya, a Mzansi Magic soap opera, where she portrayed a character of Thandeka Zungu.

Nomzamo Mbatha was born in the township of KwaMashu situated in the north west of the city of Durban in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa.

While she is known as Nomzamo Mbatha her name has also been written as Nomzamo Nxumalo Mbatha,  Nomzamo Mbatha Nxumalo as well as Nomzamo Mxumalo Mbatha.

Both Mbatha and Nxumalo are popular Zulu (and Nguni) surnames especially in her home province of KwaZulu-Natal while Mxumalo is relatively unknown.

She was raised in the KwaMashu township in KwaZulu-Natal in a household run by her late grandmother, in an interview with the Sunday World she was quoted “I grew up with my uncles and my gran was the head of the house, so I’m pretty much a granny’s girl.”

Nomzamo Mbatha is one of eight children; she is a middle child with five brothers and two sisters – one of her sisters has since passed away.

She did her schooling in Durban in the KwaZulu-Natal province.

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Nomzamo Mbatha went to Bechet High School in suburb of Sydenham in the city of Durban where she later matriculated.

After matriculating from Bechet High School she relocated to Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa.

There (Cape Town, Western Cape) Nomzamo Mbatha enrolled at the University of Cape Town to study a Bachelor of Commerce in Accounting (BComm Accounting).

Speaking about her relocation to the Western Cape leaving her grandmother behind in KwaZulu-Natal, Nomzamo Mbatha was quoted “It was really hard for Gogo [grandmother] to let go of me. We were very close, and the thought of my being so far away was too much for her.”

One year after she relocated to the Western Cape her grandmother passed away, she was quoted by the City Press remarking on the loss of her grandmother “That was a very hard time for me, but death taught me more about life than life itself. You know nothing until you’ve lost someone you love. The biggest lesson I learnt was to be fearless about grabbing opportunities. Nothing in this world is permanent, so you need to do what you can while you can.”

In is understood that Nomzamo Mbatha left the University of Cape Town following her joining IsiBaya and she is continuing her Accounting studies at the University of South Africa .