Pan African Proclamation of 2016

RBG Man...

Hotep family! It’s your brother KP.  I hope everyone is doing well.  I enjoyed my little break from posting. I thought this would be a good post for my return. Here at Kushite Kingdom I have always promoted  the idea of being Pan African. As well as covering topics like Black consciousness,economics,African culture and Black liberation. In exposing the lies that we are told about our history, I’ve tried my best to wake up my people. Many of us get so much disinformation in the media we are very confused.  That’s why I do my best to get out important information to my people. Even if I offend other races in the process. Offending people is not my concern.   If I was scared to offend others I would’ve stop blogging a long time ago.The survival of my people is my main concern.  I have always believed  that black consciousness was a spiritual path based on health,wellness amd knowledge of self. Black consciousness is appreciation for our African heritage,our people and families. And real  power is about determination and self control.  You can call this a proclamation,manifesto,mission statement or public declaration.  But I just wanted to list some ideas and things we as black people should be doing if we want to survive as well as change our mindset.  We have a lot of work ahead of us.  But together we can do this.  I’m sure some of you will like some of it…and others will disagree.  But that’s okay. I’m open to any suggestions anyone may have.

Pan African Flag..

  1. Promote Black Love
  2. Reject ideologies that have European origins
  3. Do not celebrate European holidays(White Gods)
  4. Learn a trade or skill to empower your people
  5. Teach African culture and Black History to your children. And how it can be used as an instrument of Power
Books
6. Study biology and genetics. Learn about your African bloodline.
7.Accept the harsh reality that biracial people are not black
8.Realize that you must sacrifice so that others can be free
9. To live with honor and integrity
10. Must understand that healing means we no longer allow trauma to control our lives
11. Do not engage in sexual activity with non-blacks
12. Stand for justice and equality
Heroes...
13. Learn about great African heroes such as Marcus Garvey,Nat Turner,Queen Nzinga,Shaka Zulu,Thomas Sankara,Steve Biko,Harriet Tubman,Dutty Boukman,Patrice Lumumba,Martin Delany,Edward Blyden,Alexander Crummel,Assata Shakur,Mansa Musa,Malcolm X and Jean Jacques Dessalines. Appreciate their greatness but also learn from their mistakes.
14. Read The Blueprint for Black Power by Amos Wilson(then get all his books)
15. Read The Destruction of Black Civilizations by Chancellor Williams(then get all his books)
16. Read books by black scholars such as John Henrik Clarke,Queen Afua, Kwame Ture,Marimba Ani,Jewel Pookrum,Dr Sebi,Umar Johnson,Llaila Afrika,Bobby E.Wright …among others.
17. Reject European standards of beauty and uplift African Beauty
Black woman..
18.Trust your ancestors and your instincts
19. Support Black businesses
20.Learn how to fish and hunt
21.Grow your own food
22.Learn to speak and write an African language
23.Learn how to read a map and use a compass
24.  Don’t be violent towards black homosexuals,transgenders and lesbians. Live and let live.  But realize that it is not conducive behavior for African people.
25.Understand that homosexuality,bestiality,lesbianism and pedophilia is sexual perversion.
Tomiko..
26. Do not be slut or whore.  It is very self destructive  and shows your immaturity. This applies to women….and men.
27. Assume that all non-blacks do not have your best interest in mind.
28. Brothers: Do not display a misogynistic mindset. Hating and despising black women shows ignorance and no growth as a man.  You must learn to respect your woman. Let sistas express themselves although it is okay to disagree at times. But give sistas their space.
29. Sistas: Do not be a man hating feminist.  Do not put down or degrade your man. Use words of encouragement to uplift your man.  And realize that men want to be leaders. Every gender has their role and should compliment the other gender.  A relationship is a partnership that both can benefit from.
30.  You must realize that the masculine principle  and feminine principle compliment one another. And that black men and women must work together to strengthen the family unit.

Bill Cosby: What’s real and what’s not

This is a good video by Dr Rick Wallace. He gives a great breakdown of the Bill Cosby rape allegations. He makes some very solid points about the allegations that many people might not think about. He also speaks on rape and incest in the black community.

Cosby

The ongoing saga surrounding Bill Cosby has created some interesting dialogue across America and the world; however, I will argue that the discussions and debates that should be sparked by this story are, for the most part, going unaddressed. While I believe that we need to discuss the veracity of the accusations that have been launched against Bill Cosby, and with the latest bit of information that has been released, there is definitely a dark shadow hovering over him; however, I believe a significant portion of the energy directed at this story will be better served engaging the enigmatic issues that are at the core of the story — rape, incest and molestation in the black community.

It is extremely difficult to decipher the statistics that are presented on these issues due to specific biases; however, on any level, we are dealing with an epidemic, and it is causing devastating effects. Based on academic studies and experiential observation, I would argue that no group of females on the face of the earth has been the more victimized when it comes to incest, molestation and family rape than the black woman. This is not to marginalize the struggles of any other group, but those who know me understand that my focus is always on improving the condition of my people, before engaging the needs and struggles of any other group.

Cosby

Until we seriously engage the questions and challenges that are presented through the perpetuation of this type of behavior and the neglect in properly engaging these issues, we will continue to struggle as a collective group. Ignoring incest, rape and molestation, or marginalizing it does not eliminate or mitigate its nefarious impact on our culture. The massive gulf that exists between the black man and the black woman is, at least partially, the result of these unaddressed issues. Every time that a black female experiences this type of psychological, physical and emotional trauma, and it goes unaddressed, she becomes fractured and dysfunctional. She may be able to overcompensate in certain areas to develop an appearance of having it all together; however, a closer anatomization of her mental and emotional state will reveal that she has become her own worst enemy, and you will probably find a trail of failed relationships that have manifested the horrific results of what she once believed she had left behind her.

There are black women who are struggling to maintain any semblance of a normal life, especially when it comes to maintaining a romantic relationship with a man. Her issues not only impact her ability to engage a serious and committed relationship in a healthy manner, but it also impacts her ability to effectively parent her children, which she will almost certainly have. To exacerbate the matter, one or more of her children may be the progeny of her abuser.

Child2

This black woman will struggle to trust men, making any type of healthy relationship with a man virtually impossible. When the psychological and emotional dynamics associated with child molestation and incest are considered, it is no wonder why so many of our women are fighting just to stay afloat. First of all there is the element of introducing and child to sexual activity long before they are mature enough to handle the repercussions that are associated with it. There is a general consensus that having sex too early in life presents multitudinous dangers. Although there is a difference in opinion as far as what age constitutes too early, most would agree that the age at which most molestation within the family environment, incest, begins, is far too young for a child to appropriately process what is taking place. This is the first phase of trauma and devastation, but it is not the only thing that they will have to deal with. Another dynamic, which may be even more injurious than the damage caused by the early introduction to sexual activity, is the fact that the assault is being perpetrated by someone that the victim loves and trusts. In fact, the perpetrator is often the very one that should be protecting the child from such dangers. This betrayal of trust is highly pernicious and its destructive impact can literally damage a person for life.

It is also important to understand that this type of trauma is not exclusive to black women. Young black boys are assaulted at an alarming rate, primarily by men — putting to bed a common myth that pedophilia is a white issue. The postulation that black men are not pedophiles is due to the fact that this type of behavior is often covered up in the family, and the perpetrator is often protected from prosecution, further placing children in the family at risk. Almost all of us have the uncle or cousin, or maybe father or brother that everyone in the family keeps their kids from. There is a reason for that.

What is even more alarming is abused people who do not get treatment are likely to abuse others. While females will generally manifest their issues through verbal and physical abuse toward their children, young males are more likely to offend in the very same way that they were violated. The perversion of such a natural act can cause immeasurable damage.

While this entire issue with Bill Cosby has brought out the ugly side of many people, I see it as an opportunity to properly engage these issues in an in-depth manner. Not only do we need to discuss these issues through open dialogue, but we need to develop a strategy to attack the issues in a manner that will produce efficacious results. We can’t simply sit around and talk about it, and finger pointing will get us nowhere. We need to create programs for victims of child molestation and incest within the black community. We must also be willing to provide the help that is needed by those who perpetrate these crimes — keeping in mind that they were once victims themselves.

While the Bill Cosby Saga may be intriguing to some, and an opportunity to strike out for others, we should be focused on the bigger issue here — lifting, protecting and healing our women and young men who are the victims of these merciless crimes. ~ Dr. Rick Wallace