Bakari Henderson beaten to death: Why didn’t his white friends help?

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Bakari Henderson was  beaten to death last week in the Greek Islands. He was only 22 years old with his whole life ahead of him. It was at a nightclub by a group of racist Serbians.  I heard that he had taken a picture with a white women.  And I guess the Serbian guys didn’t like that too much. He was beaten by a bouncer,bartender and six tourists. Henderson was with a group of white “friends”.  His so called friends say how much they loved him and cared for him.  So…why didn’t they intervene?  Since they loved him so much. This is a damn shame!

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I feel bad for this young brother.  I feel bad anytime there is the loss of black life. I feel for his family as well.   But we have to be honest. He put himself in harms way.  It doesn’t matter if they were Serbians.  Europeans are the same no matter where you go.  First things first. Going out with a white woman and a group of white friends to Europe is a bad move!  No black friends in sight. Europe is rampant with racism.  The anti-blackness is through the roof!  But I think he was young and naïve.  I guess he didn’t know it at the time put he put himself in danger by doing that.  Black people need to understand this when they travel abroad.  Places like Europe and Middle east are very anti-black.  I’m not saying you shouldn’t travel.  I think black people should get a passport and travel more.  But just be smart about it.  Go with someone that has been to the country before.  And go with a group of other black people.  Whether they are family or personal friends.  Just make sure it’s some people that aren’t going to  just stand around like cowards while  you’re getting beat to death.  A lot of our people have bought into the idea of being color blind.  Or that “loves sees no color”.  Well if you think like that you need to snap out of that fantasy.  It could be a matter of life and death. Let Bakari be a lesson to others. Peace.

Sandra Bland: Facts vs Fiction

This is a video and post by Rick Wallace. The brother makes some very valid points regarding the Sandra Bland case. Read the following article and let me know what you think.

What is submitted here is the demand that blacks stop jumping on every bandwagon simply because it supports their theory. The objective should always be truth — truth, in conjunction with consistency, is the foundation on which credibility and respect are developed. If we are to be taken serious, we must be willing to engage facts that may not support our theories. We have to be willing to acknowledge when we may have spoken hastily on a matter. Am I saying that Sandra Bland killed herself, at this time, I have to say that I don’t know. What I can say is that I have seen a lot of things that are not receiving enough attention, things that point to the possibility that she may have taken her own life.

What disgusts me is all of the false stories and theories like the “dead in the mugshot theory,” which makes absolutely no sense (see excerpt for explanation). The truth is that it is easier for blacks to believe that she was murdered than it is to believe that a black person took their own life under distress. I have conducted a significant amount of research since this surfaced, and what I have uncovered is that there has actually been more formulated BS from our side than the side of law enforcement. Don’t get me wrong, there were definitely some spins placed on the story by law enforcement, which will always going to be the case; however, some of the stuff that was being circulated by us and all of these desktop psychologists was absolutely ridiculous.

It is time that we step back and begin to break this down piece by piece. At this point, I will say that regardless of whether Sandra Bland killed herself or she was murdered, the video of the arrests presents enough to declare that she was wrongfully arrested, and therefore, responsibility for her death begins with DPS. If at some time, there is evidence that supports murder charges, then we will move for that as well, but from what I am hearing the second and independent autopsy, which was ordered and paid for by Sandra Bland’s family, also came to the conclusion that her death was caused by suicide. I am still attempting to confirm this for myself. I do know that the results of that second autopsy have been kept on the hush, and that says a lot.

Well, read my post and hopefully, it will spark some dialogue that can actually serves to move us in a direction in which we gain ground in a number of areas that go beyond meaningless debate.

Another senseless death! It’s okay to be angry at the injustice!

Michael Brown

Endangered Species

Whatever perverse view the Ferguson police officer had of Michael Brown — and all Black men like him — before taking his life and leaving him to lay in his blood for hours afterward, his mother has made sure to counter such characterizations. Lesley McSpadden described her now-fallen son as a boy with the sort of disposition that made him more like “a big teddy bear” as opposed to someone who deserved to be slaughtered like a dog in the street. McSpadden went on to explain, “He was a good boy. He deserved none of this. We need justice for our son.”

No stranger to this kind of disregard toward Black people’s humanity, attorney Benjamin Crump, who has since been retained by Brown’s parents, made his thoughts clear at a recent press conference. “I don’t want to sugarcoat it, their baby was executed in broad daylight,” Crump noted. “We want to know and see exactly what happened because this family rejects what the police authorities said at their press conference.”

As does Michael Brown’s friend, Dorian Johnson, who along with other eyewitnesses, disputed Brown’s killer’s claims that he shoved the officer and tried to wrestle the officer’s gun from him.

Any Black man living in this country and who values his life knows better than to tempt fate that way.

The truth may be less imaginative but no less chilling: Even when we don’t fight back, our presence is still intimidating to the point where select members of law enforcement feel no choice but to shoot us dead.

Such a revelation brings justified anger, and while Brown’s parents have encouraged protesters to remain peaceful, their rage is understandable.

Protesters arrived with signs and peaceful discourse and were greeted with dogs, rubber bullets, and tear gas.

And as New York Times correspondent Julie Bosman reported via Twitter, these rubber bullets were even shot in the direction of journalists and photographers. Meanwhile, area police officers describe the scene as a “war zone” and even when protesters sought an exit, the police reportedly blocked them from locating one. There’s since been word of one police officer referring to protesters as “fucking animals” during coverage on CNN.

Yet, some wonder why some of the protesters supposedly sang, “F*ck the police.”

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And while I don’t necessarily excuse the acts of looters and those described as “rioters,” I do have empathy. This is why I take issue with Jonathan Capeheart’s “A Shameful Way To Protest the Michael Brown Shooting,” where he writes, “This is not how you make authorities understand your anger and concern. This is not how you get others to join your cause.”

You mean the authorities who shot a Black child in cold blood, left him in the street for hours as some sort of “example” to other people in his area, and greet peaceful protest with nothing but contempt and the intent to further antagonize? The same authorities who employ individuals who refer to the rightfully angry public as “f*cking animals.” The authorities who enter their neighborhood and limit their access?

 

I am not in the business of policing people’s emotions particularly with respect to dire situations such as these. Anger has its consequences, including irrational behavior. It doesn’t make it right, but learn to have compassion for people in a situation you have yet to experience. There’s a time for discussions on personal responsibility and there’s a time to look at tragedy and respect the rightful rage it creates.

Many people are angry and they are running on empty.

I am tired of having to write about people like Michael Brown. The same goes for 22-year-old John Crawford III, who was shot and killed after holding a BB gun in a Walmart. Like Brown’s mother, Crawford’s father described his son fondly, saying, “He was a good son and a good Father to his two children.”

We shouldn’t have to quantify our lives this way.

It doesn’t even matter if Michael Brown was a “big teddy bear” heading to college or that John Crawford was a good Dad. No matter what kind of personalities they had, there was no reason to slaughter them this way. We shouldn’t have to worry that once our lives are unjustly stripped from us, we will be purposely vilified in order to excuse our killers’ actions — as evidenced in the trending topic #IfTheyGunnedMeDown, and more hauntingly, in both trials relating to the deaths of Trayvon Martin and Renisha McBride.

Long List

Structural racism, widening economic inequality, a gun manufacturing lobby so hell bent on making money that they’ll probably see to it that guide dogs for the blind receive gun permits, plus the continuation of the militarization of police have all helped it be open season on Black people. You can’t help but feel exhaustion, grief, and yes, anger.  To some, such rage may not “help our cause,” but the alternative clearly has its limitations too.

Cooler heads should prevail, but be clear about who the real hotheads causing trouble are.

Article by Michael Arceneaux