A United Kingdom-Interracial propaganda Film

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Looks like Hollywood has the perfect film just in time for their Greco-Roman, pagan,orgy-inspired holiday known as Valentine’s Day.  The interracial propaganda is relentless.  When President Obama was in office there a big increase in interracial couples in television dramas,sitcoms and films.  By him being biracial,he was used as a symbol of some type of racial harmony. Of course we know this is nonsense. There can be no racial harmony when one racial group has more power than another group.  This is where the propaganda comes in. I   have covered  this subject many times in the past.  And it looks like I’ll have to continue to do as long as they keep putting these films out.  Now we have the film A United Kingdom. The basic synopsis :

“The film is based on a true story. Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo) is the Prince of Bechuanaland (now Botswana). In 1948 he meets and falls in love with London office worker Ruth Williams (Rosamund Pike). But their interracial relationship is not approved of by either of their families, nor by the British and South African governments. Seretse and Ruth must defy family, apartheid and the British empire to return from an imposed exile to their African kingdom, and assume power after independence.”

This trailer(above) is very hard to watch.  Here you have an African prince and he wants to marry a white woman??  This is total insanity.  This is self hatred to the fullest!  I don’t want to hear any crap about color blind love.  This is nothing but propaganda to make us love our oppressors.  A white woman as a queen in an African nation is blasphemous! This is a slap in the face to black love.   Seretse Khama is a disgrace to African people. Khama sold out his nation.  He is no prince!  Isn’t it interesting that Hollywood can find money to make this film but not about real African heroes.  There were African men and women that did great things in the past.  What about a film about Thomas Sankara?  Patrice Lumumba? Yaa Asantewaa? Queen Tiye? Marcus Garvey? Haitian revolution?  Queen Nzinga? Nope!  Instead they give a stupid ass love story between a brain dead Negro who gives his fortune away to a common white woman.  This film is stupid  and insulting on so many levels.

This is a very interesting interview with the stars David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike. Pike says that the film tackles racial prejudice from both sides.  She says that it’s about two people that are color blind.  Give me a break!  This white woman is lying through her teeth.  She knows damn well no one is color blind.  And our society is nowhere near that.  The world is comprised of racial groups.  Color blindness is a myth. Then Oyewolo goes on to say that the way to “unite a kingdom” is through love. And that Botswana has control of “most” of it’s resources.  How did they lose some of their resources?  How took them? I think you know the answer. And he says that Botswana sees itself has post-racial.  This is man is insane! How can Africa be post-racial when you got Europeans trying to steal land and resources?  He also says that his white wife has a small part in the film.  She plays a…..racist!  How fitting is that.  You can’t make this stuff up. Black love and black unity is the way to fight white racism.  The answer is not marrying and making babies with your oppressor.  This film is designed to confuse black people about racism.

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This picture(above) is  of Amma Asante and her husband.  She is a screenwriter and director. She is the director of A United Kingdom. Why would a black woman do an interracial love story?   Well that’s an easy answer.  Just look  at her husband and  it’s easy to see why this so-called universal love story is close to her heart.

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Amma Asante is a very sick woman!  This black woman has lost her damn mind.You don’t think so?  Well check out the picture(above).  That is a photo of the upcoming film When Hands Touch.  It’s a World War 2 “love story”. It stars Amandla Stenberg who plays a biracial girl who falls in love with a Nazi youth.  What the hell??  Even though Stenberg is biracial in this racial context she will be seen as just a black girl.  I will cover the problem of biracial women representing black women in a later post.  But anyway this film has taken “love they enemy” to a whole different level!  They want us to love Nazi’s now???  What’s next?  A  love story with Adolf Hitler and Angela Bassett?   Or maybe Denzel Washington falling in love with a female skinhead?  I wouldn’t put it pass Hollywood at this point. Amma Asante has sold her sold for the chance to corrupt the minds of black people.  She is a female version of Lee Daniels.

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I understand better now why  David Oyelowo was chosen for the lead role.  In Hollywood he’s the go-to Negro at the moment.  He’s been in other anti-black propaganda films like The Butler,Red Tails and The Help.  And judging by the pic(above) of Oyelowo and his family,I think he was perfect for the role.  Oyelowo and Asante are one in the same.  They are both from the United Kingdom.  And neither one of them believes in  black love or black unity.  They believe the way to defeat racism,oppression, and colonization is to just love your oppressor.  Both of them are brain dead swirlers. But whatever you do,don’t support this film.  Save your money and stay far away from this garbage of a film.

Ana Nzinga Mbande-Queen of Angola

NPG D34632; Ann Zingha by Achille DevÈria, printed by  FranÁois Le Villain, published by  Edward Bull, published by  Edward Churton, after  Unknown artist

In the 16th century, Portuguese slave traders turned to the Congo and southwest Africa, after their stake in the slave trade was threatened by England and France in the northern part of the continent. Their most stubborn opposition came from an unexpected source: an Angolan queen who ruthlessly maneuvered her way into power, fought off the slavers for decades, and, rumor has it, immolated her lovers.

Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba, also known as Nzinga Mbandi, Anna Nzinga, and Rainha Ginga, was born in 1583 to the king of Ndongo, a kingdom of the Mbundu people in modern-day Angola. The story goes that Nzinga was so named because she was born with her mother’s umbilical cord wrapped around her neck, and the Mbundu word for “to twist” is kujinga (an alternate spelling of Nzinga is “Njinga”). This circumstance was believed to indicate that the child would grow to be proud and haughty.

The king, Ngola Kiluanji, allowed Nzinga and his son, Ngola Mbandi, to witness his governance of the kingdom, which included numerous guerrilla raids against Portuguese invaders who were trying to infiltrate the territory. His children, as a result, grew up with a sharp understanding of the horrific implications of Portuguese colonization, which depended on slavery to expand its reach and riches.

According to Joseph C. Miller’s Nzinga of Matamba in a New Perspective, Nzinga first appears in the historical record in 1622, when she arrived in Luanda as the emissary for her brother, the ruler at the time. He had been dedicating all of his efforts and forces to keeping the Portuguese out of the highlands east of Luanda. During her visit, Nzinga converted to Christianity, and was baptized as Ana de Souza, a fact that would help her in her later negotiations with the Portuguese. Within two years of his sister’s visit to Luanda, Ngola Mbandi had died under unknown circumstances, and Nzinga had staked her claim as ruler of the kingdom.

Though Nzinga was about to revolutionize diplomatic relations between the Portuguese and the Mbundu state, she seized her title with great opposition from the internal political factions in the kingdom. The 17th-century Mbundu kingdom was made up of a hierarchy of linked political titleholders each with their own followings. After Ngola Mbandi’s death, the king’s title would normally have gone to the leader with a combination of the most number of followers and the most deft political maneuvering.

“The scant evidence available on Nzinga’s place in this general structure indicates that her claim to the royal title of the ngola a kiluanje violated established Mbundu norms,” writes Miller. “The Mbundu harbored strong feelings against females assuming any political title and explicitly prohibited any woman from assuming the position of the ngola a kiluanje.”

Initially, the Portuguese did not recognize Nzinga as the rightful ruler of the Mbundu people, either; they suspected that she was somehow implicated in her brother’s death and refused to honor her right to succeed him. They instead assumed that the heir apparent to the Mbundu throne was Ngola Mbandi’s son.

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As a result, Nzinga was forced to turn to support from outside the state: from a band of Imbangala warriors who inhabited the borders of the Mbundu kingdom and had expressed hostility against both Mbundu and Portuguese armies in the past. She also offered asylum to slaves escaping from Portuguese territories, eventually recruiting them as manpower.

The Imbangala in particular were crucial to increasing Nzinga’s position in domestic politics. Not only were they notorious for their fierce ways and highly effective war strategies, they did not have the same hierarchical structure as the Mbundu and frequently recognized women under the title of tembanza: a leader in both war and politics. Nzinga manipulated the Imbangala’s readiness to accept a kinless woman as their leader by assuming the tembanza position in a group of Imbangala lead by the kaza, one of the most powerful warlords in the region.

The Mbundu recognized Nzinga’s situation with the kaza as a marriage of sorts, and so did the Portuguese. According to Miller, Nzinga then used the kaza to help her kill her brother’s son, the heir apparent, in an effort to secure her position as the leader of the Mbundu. However, eventually the Imbangala left Nzinga and defected to the Portuguese due to her lack of Imbangala ancestry. By 1629, Nzinga was left without allies, with the Portuguese army in hot pursuit.

She fled to the old Mbundu kingdom of Matamba, a safeground that had in recent years been ravaged by Portuguese and Imbangala raids. In the 16th century, Matamba had flourished under the rule of several queens, although they had long since ceded rule to Nzinga’s father, Ngola Kiluanji, and later her brother. The disarray after his death and the various raids had created a political vacuum which Nzinga was quick to fill, using their willingness to accept female rulers to buttress her position as leader of the Mbundu.

Nzinga increased her wealth, her armies and her power by blocking Portuguese access to slave trade routes and diverting the slaves into Matamba. She continued to resist Portuguese troops well into her 60s, and it is said that she would wear male dress and lead her armies into battle herself.

Legends of Nzinga extend outside of her brilliant military tactics and political strategy. In Philosophy in the Boudoir, the Marquis de Sade wrote that Nzinga “immolated her lovers,” obtaining a large, all-male harem after she became queen and having each man she slept with killed after their carnal encounter. Though there is no way of knowing if there is truth to these rumors, there is no denying Nzinga was a ruthless ruler, unafraid of sacrificing men who came in her way.

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In 1657, at the age of 74, Nzinga entered peace treaty talks with the Portuguese, after having fought and been worn down by colonial and slave raiding attacks for decades. After conceding much of her power, Nzinga devoted her efforts to rebuilding her war-torn nation. Following her death in 1663, the Portuguese lost their most valiant opposition and were able to accelerate their colonial occupation.

As Donald Burness points out in “Nzinga Mbandi” and Angolan Independence, up until the 20th century, not much had been written by African writers on historical African revolutionaries. But during Angola’s fight for independence from the Portuguese in the 1970s, an MPLA leader named Manual Pacavira wrote a novel about Nzinga called Nzinga Mbandi while imprisoned by the Portuguese, drawing many parallels between her fight and the ongoing civil war.

“The spirit of Rainha Ginga is not dead; it serves as a source of inspiration and pride to a people and its leaders who face new challenges and new opportunities,” writes Burness. Angola is now independent, and a statue dedicated to Nzinga in Luanda serves as a tribute to one of the first people to have fought for its freedom.

Article written by Urvija Banjeri

Lesliana Pereira

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Lesliana Pereira, former Miss Angola has won the 2015 Africa Movie Academy Awards (AMAA) for the Best Actress in a Leading Role for her outstanding performance in “Njinga: Queen of Angola”.

Lesliana Massoxi Amaro Gomes Pereira, simply known as Lesliana Pereira, is a model, TV presenter, actress and beauty queen. She was born on born October 9, 1985 in Soyo, Zaire. And was crowned Miss Angola in 2008 and represented the country at the Miss Universe 2008. “Njinga – Queen Of Angola” is her debut.

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The 11th Africa Movie Academy Awards (AMAA) held last night at the Boardwalk International Convention Centre, Nelson Mandela Bay, Port Elizabeth in South Africa.
It is the first AMAA outside Nigeria and has attracted more attention than the previous editions hosted by Bayelsa State in the state capital of Yenagoa since the inaugural edition in May 2005, except for the 2008 edition of AMAA held in Abuja, federal capital of Nigeria and the 2012 edition held in Lagos.

“Njinga – Queen Of Angola” directed by Sérgio Graciano, is based on Queen Anna Nzinga, also known as Ana de Sousa Nzinga Mbande, a 17th-century queen (muchino a muhatu) of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms of the Mbundu people in Angola. The historical film chronicles her journey as an Amazon; woman without fear, who, for 40 years, defended the independence of the Ndongo and Matamba kingdoms.
Njinga Mbande, born in 1582, became famous for the courage and ability to unite different peoples in the struggle against Portuguese invaders. Its actual title in the language quimbundo – “ngola” – was the name used by the Portuguese to name that region, Angola. UNESCO has recognized her as one of the 25 most important female figures in African history,
“Njinga – Queen Of Angola” is the biggest Angolan film so far.

Pan African Proclamation of 2016

RBG Man...

Hotep family! It’s your brother KP.  I hope everyone is doing well.  I enjoyed my little break from posting. I thought this would be a good post for my return. Here at Kushite Kingdom I have always promoted  the idea of being Pan African. As well as covering topics like Black consciousness,economics,African culture and Black liberation. In exposing the lies that we are told about our history, I’ve tried my best to wake up my people. Many of us get so much disinformation in the media we are very confused.  That’s why I do my best to get out important information to my people. Even if I offend other races in the process. Offending people is not my concern.   If I was scared to offend others I would’ve stop blogging a long time ago.The survival of my people is my main concern.  I have always believed  that black consciousness was a spiritual path based on health,wellness amd knowledge of self. Black consciousness is appreciation for our African heritage,our people and families. And real  power is about determination and self control.  You can call this a proclamation,manifesto,mission statement or public declaration.  But I just wanted to list some ideas and things we as black people should be doing if we want to survive as well as change our mindset.  We have a lot of work ahead of us.  But together we can do this.  I’m sure some of you will like some of it…and others will disagree.  But that’s okay. I’m open to any suggestions anyone may have.

Pan African Flag..

  1. Promote Black Love
  2. Reject ideologies that have European origins
  3. Do not celebrate European holidays(White Gods)
  4. Learn a trade or skill to empower your people
  5. Teach African culture and Black History to your children. And how it can be used as an instrument of Power
Books
6. Study biology and genetics. Learn about your African bloodline.
7.Accept the harsh reality that biracial people are not black
8.Realize that you must sacrifice so that others can be free
9. To live with honor and integrity
10. Must understand that healing means we no longer allow trauma to control our lives
11. Do not engage in sexual activity with non-blacks
12. Stand for justice and equality
Heroes...
13. Learn about great African heroes such as Marcus Garvey,Nat Turner,Queen Nzinga,Shaka Zulu,Thomas Sankara,Steve Biko,Harriet Tubman,Dutty Boukman,Patrice Lumumba,Martin Delany,Edward Blyden,Alexander Crummel,Assata Shakur,Mansa Musa,Malcolm X and Jean Jacques Dessalines. Appreciate their greatness but also learn from their mistakes.
14. Read The Blueprint for Black Power by Amos Wilson(then get all his books)
15. Read The Destruction of Black Civilizations by Chancellor Williams(then get all his books)
16. Read books by black scholars such as John Henrik Clarke,Queen Afua, Kwame Ture,Marimba Ani,Jewel Pookrum,Dr Sebi,Umar Johnson,Llaila Afrika,Bobby E.Wright …among others.
17. Reject European standards of beauty and uplift African Beauty
Black woman..
18.Trust your ancestors and your instincts
19. Support Black businesses
20.Learn how to fish and hunt
21.Grow your own food
22.Learn to speak and write an African language
23.Learn how to read a map and use a compass
24.  Don’t be violent towards black homosexuals,transgenders and lesbians. Live and let live.  But realize that it is not conducive behavior for African people.
25.Understand that homosexuality,bestiality,lesbianism and pedophilia is sexual perversion.
Tomiko..
26. Do not be slut or whore.  It is very self destructive  and shows your immaturity. This applies to women….and men.
27. Assume that all non-blacks do not have your best interest in mind.
28. Brothers: Do not display a misogynistic mindset. Hating and despising black women shows ignorance and no growth as a man.  You must learn to respect your woman. Let sistas express themselves although it is okay to disagree at times. But give sistas their space.
29. Sistas: Do not be a man hating feminist.  Do not put down or degrade your man. Use words of encouragement to uplift your man.  And realize that men want to be leaders. Every gender has their role and should compliment the other gender.  A relationship is a partnership that both can benefit from.
30.  You must realize that the masculine principle  and feminine principle compliment one another. And that black men and women must work together to strengthen the family unit.