Dear Melanated People(Hidden Wisdom)

Hidden Wisdom...

DEAR BLACK PEOPLE PEOPLE(AFRICANS,SUN PEOPLE,INDIGENOUS),YOU ARE THE ORIGINAL MELANATED BEINGS.YOU ARE THE ULTIMATE OF ALL THINGS. THE KNOWLEDGE OF THIS IS FORGOTTEN,LOST WHEN MAN WAS CAST INTO BONDAGE,BOUND AND FETTERED BY THE CHAINS OF DARKNESS. MIGHTY ARE THEY WITH THE FORBIDDEN KNOWLEDGE. SECRETLY USING THEIR POWERS,ENSLAVING AND BINDING THE SOULS OF THE ORIGINAL PEOPLE. DRAWING OTHERS INTO THEIR DARKNESS.  KNOW THAT THE SOUL IS LIVING IN BONDAGE FETTERED BY FEARS THAT HOLD YOU THRALL. BUT IN THE END THE RIGHTEOUS WILL PREVAIL.  THE EVIL DEEDS WILL BE PAID BY KARMIC DEBT. THIS IS THE WAY THE UNIVERSE HAS ALWAYS OPERATED SINCE TIME IMMEMORIAL. BUT JUST KNOW THAT THE HUE-MAN/WOMB-MAN CAN OVERCOME THE EVILS OF MAN-KIND. ONLY BY WISDOM YOU CAN BE TRULY FREE.

Melanin by D’Nessa McDaniel

Monet....jpg

From the night in her skin to kink of her hair

The sun in her smile to the stars in those eyes

I know that Melanin is beautiful

The beauty that glows through her

blood like magic

Her melanin drips like honey

Can you imagine a voice so sweet you could taste the diabetes

Can you imagine how the tears of this woman will make rivers

You will find the souls of her sons floating in

Dreams of haunting, of prey, of white of guns of nose,

nose is tight like she is tight like a nose

This kind of melanin

This kind of woman

Makes the worst days worth living for

Makes trying to live some of the worst days

But this type of melanin is strong

Even when the pavement of her heart starts to crack under oppression

She will still bleed love, hope, smiles, and laughter

she will bleed the bloodshed of her father’s death

She will ache the pain of the weight her mother carried on her black

Because of this I know that melanin is beautiful

Is pain, is sorrow, is love, is her

She is love

She is what made melanin so damn beautiful.

Poem by D’Nessa McDaniel

Dim Your light Dark Girl: Invisibility and Black Femininity

Bria Myles...

After my first semester of teaching I was invited to meet with the department chair, a frumpy, middle aged- white woman who treated me like white retailers have my entire life–as if my presence depreciated the value of the company. She arrived over thirty minutes late for my meeting, a fact she would casually disregard when pushing me out of her office not even ten minutes later. Her actions stated that I did not belong, despite the fake and almost nervous smile worn as an effort to melt my stoic expression. In those ten minutes she’d gloat about what she considered “bad” student reviews— an attempt to break me down into a negro in need of a fictive white brilliance to step into the role of woman. This was the same woman who failed to provide me with the room number for my class and made it so that I received my first check shortly before midterms. I was invisible until something seemingly negative surfaced, then my black female body became a canvass for white shame, a means to bludgeon me until my  posture slouched in defeat. For white functionality is solely rooted in black inferiority, no matter how hard the white body must work to make their fictive superiority a reality.

The contemporary black female body exists in the shadow of her ancestors, only seen in instances of negativity, because to acknowledge her in her beauty and brilliance is to threaten the false esteem of her oppressors. Sadly, the same is true for the melanated individuals referenced interchangeably with those black in body and mind.  In conversations or simply in the presence of melanated folk, the black woman is ignored if not overtly deficient in one way or another.

In Black Looks, scholar and cultural critic bell hooks says the following of black female visibility:

Objectified in a manner similar to the block female slaves who stood on auction blocks while owners and overseers described their important, salable parts, the black woman whose naked bodies were displayed for whites out social function had no presence. They were reduced to mere spectacles. Their body parts were offered as evidence to support racist notions that black people were more a kin to animals than other humans (hooks 62).

Just like the Saartje Baartmans of the past, the black female body remains a dismembered presence that only becomes visible to prove white superiority. The black woman is commonly shoved, reached over and ignored in quotidian activities from riding the train to grocery shopping. However, if wearing a garment where her protruding backside is visible, or her breasts or legs are exposed, she assumes the hyper visibility of her ancestors cast along the auction block, dismembered by the white male gaze and itemized for white male consumption.

I write this post in hopes of enlightening the black female and even black males to embedded expectations that subconsciously recruit us as soldiers of white supremacy. Namely, many blacks have also grown comfortable with caricatures blackness and downcast their own for failing to embody the necessary imperfection to seem normal in our western setting. This imperfection is commonly conceptualized in labeling the black female body a “bitch” or “whore.”

Black bitch....

The Black “Bitch”

A student called me a bitch for the first time this semester. I’m actually pretty sure I, like my sisters throughout the diaspora,  have been called worse, but this was the first time a student had rendered an expletive to my face. Following hurling the expletive my way, the student proceeded to talk over me until storming out the classroom and reporting to the dean.

The cause of the altercation you ask? I simply asked the student a question.

Like clockwork the dean shows up a few minutes later asking to see me. An act that festered the very authority challenged by my student. After dismissing my class I went to visit this middle-aged white women with a foreign accent, short haircut and slightly abrasive attitude. She asked me what happens and becomes overtly agitated when I disclose that the student called me a bitch. She then rolls her eyes, sighs and asks me to prepare a written statement. Although I had been disrespected twice that morning, once by the student and again when the director came to remove me from the class like a misbehaved student, it was me who had burdened her. In producing a response to the query she asked me, I cast this poor woman as the victim  because she would now have to draft some paperwork.

“You have to be very careful how you address these students.”

I nodded indifferently.

“Be careful.” she said, with her eyes locking intensely with mine, embedding a slew of words she wished to say but could not.

The exchange was a vindictive display of power by a being disinterested in both my and my student’s well being. All the director saw was money. So instead of engaging my comfort in returning a student who blatantly disrespected me, my other students, and most importantly herself, it was without discussion that she would return to the class.To the director I was salt thrown in the would of a battered ego. I, like countless other black bodies cast throughout the diaspora, had become too visible in a space solely desiring my invisibility. To lure students into an invidious state, is to insult the white bodies who wish to be the sole source to evoke green from a black a gaze.

This is an unexpected example of black females being asked to be less of themselves to not fester insecurity in their counterparts, who must remain subjugated for whites domination.

Similar are the conversations that surround the black female body and romance. The black female body is commonly compartmentalized as “intimidating” if failing to exist as the a caricature, or controlling image like the mammy, jezebel, sapphire or tragic mulatto.

The strong black Woman is too independent to appease the male ego. The angry black Women too abrasive for the masculine pride. The beautiful woman is too high maintenance and too tenable, the educated woman too intellectually elevated to have her feet planted firmly on the ground.  The black woman can seemingly not win when it comes to possessing attributes that extinguish a caricatured identity and propel her into a state of hyper-visibility.

Just as the directors sought to admonish with the words “be careful” the black woman is often issued a similar warning in being told to re evaluate how she carries herself. She is to exist to make others seem bigger in comparison to her smallness. To other blacks she is to encourage them to aim low and garner some attribute of a subjugated being.

The black body, if not dwarfed by the ax of white supremacy is nurtured to bend in order to fit through doorways–rather than build their own structure to which she can strut through in her prodigious state. The only thing the black Women is, is too stereotyped. If too pretty, too smart or too successful the white and other persons of colors typically aim to discount blackness with other races or ethnicities to eschew diversifying their perspective on black people.

Seemingly a lifetime ago I worked as a customer service representative. I worked alongside a beautiful sun kissed woman, labeled difficult and unprofessional. She was helpful in teaching me the ropes and aiding me with difficult customers. The issue was not that she was difficult, or unprofessional, but that she refused to be invisible in instances of overt racism.  I recall an incident where a white “businessman” yelled at us to complete his task because “he had things to do.” He had dropped his item and demanded that I get on my knees in a dress to obtain his item. My coworker came to my defense and we were both reprimanded in consequence. To our oppressors were were not wronged, but in the wrong for refusing the demands of an oppressor. Where oppressors see green, the conscious gaze sees racism.

Beyonce and Rihanna.....jpg

The whore

The black female that escapes being labeled the bitch (or in addition to this label), is often compartmentalizes as a sexualized object. This is not to say that the black female body fully escapes the negative connotation as a difficult being, but that the white gaze conceptualizes her sexually. This may sound complimentary to those who falsely equate a sexual gaze to an appreciation of beauty. A sexualized gaze means black female bodies are seen in correspondence to sex, i.e. concubines or asexual beans. Beyonce, Rihanna, etc, are black women who maintain relevancy because they are seen as sexualized objects. All the hype surrounding Beyonce’s fertility, or Rihanna’a latest partner, both reflect a fascination with black female genitalia. This fascination also functions in the reverse. Black female bodies lacking conventional attributes that would deem them overtly sexual, become demonized. Examples are Serena Williams, Wendy Williams, Gabourey Sidibie, etc, women who because of unconventional features are deemed beasts by the true beasts of the western world. Whether hyper sexual, de-sexualized or a bitch, the black female body continues to surface as a female subjugate by her white male oppressors.

As a female subjugate, the western gaze validates not only murdering or incarcerating  the black female body, but resigning her to invisibility by default. By subjugating the black female body to a womanless being, the western gaze seeks to dim the light on a ethereal presence who shines in her sun kissed state– a state withheld from the white  experience.

The dark girl is continually required to dim her light to ensure the comfort of the world around her. If  the dark girl  fails to bow her head in the face of racism she is a “bitch” and “difficult,”  If the dark girl’s sensuality proves impossible to ignore in the western terrain, or she bears multiple children in the face of white female infertility she’s a whore, or welfare mother who’s untamable sexuality bills the white collar world. She is not to shine her light too brightly.  We are the stage, not the performer, the words not the song, the pedestal not the recipient.

To shrink to western expectation is to forfeit the “stand out” quality that is the black woman. White supremacy is quite similar to how the western world has been nurtured to conceptualize the moonlight– whiteness that illuminates along darkness. Without the dark sky the moon and the stars do not glow. Rather than be a beacon for those who glow against our background, it’s time that the black collective become entranced by our own glow.

Dark women are the true light of the western world. We are the moon, the sun, and the stars. Moreover, we need not look out the window to see the glow of the moon, we must simply look within.

Don’t dim your light black girl. Shine.

Black Power. ❤

Article by CC Saunders

Colorism by BlackmyStory

Skin tone1...

Colorism is a prejudice or discrimination against individuals with a dark skin tone, typically among people of the same ethnic or racial group. Many have noted that “colorism within the black community has been a serious emotional and psychological battle”.
Colorism is a practice of discrimination by which those with lighter skin are treated more favorably than those with darker skin. In the African community of amurdikkka our existence under white pathology, has traditionally played out the skin game via the paper bag test. Those lighter than the standard paper lunch bag were allowed entry into fraternities, sororities and other realms of black upper class life, while dark-skinned blacks were excluded.
Jesse....
More than anything, what the whole fall out around the Jesse Williams scripted Black Lives Matter speech tells me, is that colorism is still a formidable force plaguing us still.
More than the response of his detractors, who have dismissed the speech’s wide acceptance based on him being a half breed, are his supporters who behave way more retarded. For the supporters it wasn’t just about his speech either, but how they reacted to a LIGHT SKINDED, male who WAS making that speech.
The females and surely some undercover fags, almost orgasmic reaction to his looks and his eyes, went beyond just appreciating his speech, as they pretend to.
I was struck to pen this post due to this latest spectacle, as well as the increasing proliferation of images of black people…some as dark as righteousness, with shockingly blue eyes.
A while back another image of black children from the Solomon Island, sporting blond afros, circulated excessively for a time. Many of them also sporting blue eyes as well. They straw that was grasped was that these show the Afrikan woman can produce all types of looks.
Despite the narrative that many of the look of the Solomon islanders were the product of colonial rape and or fall out from decades of French nuclear testing in that region, or a genetic mutation naturally occurring, the “we are the world” set, continue to promote their color struck view of nature.
Blue eyes...
Some have pointed to Albinos as another example of this black woman’s ability to produce the white race. For your information, the albino is not white. He or she is an Afrikan who through a DEFECT of birth, come out devoid of the deep dermal melanin afforded their more fortunate brothers and sisters. And just like in the animal kingdom, the albino was considered an anomaly and weak. Not expected to survive. This is why many develop serious skin cancer, whether in the sun extensively or not. But of course the common man never gets the whole story. There is a very dangerous approach by the modern kneegrows on the continent of Afrika, who slaughter or maim the Albinos for some supposed magic they believe exists in the Albino’s bodies. This is a primitive and savage belief that has a religious connotation derived from the original savage’s spreading of the white skin as magical and superior. I mentioned the Albino because for the discerning among us, their conditions and presence have been older and more wide spread than the Solomon Islanders and these other images of dark skinned blue eyed people.
Sometimes back, I had studied iridology and though I don’t practice it as a profession, one thing that stayed with me was that the Afrikan’s cornea is not only thicker, but more melanated than the European. In fact…the melanin content scale of the European’s cornea and iris goes from the high of the dark brown, to green to the blue. Blue being the weakest and indicative of much more toxicity. Some even have very pale almost white eyes. Almost like a ghoul.
The kneegrows love with light eyes is something that gets lost in the debate over the light skin. Yet when we see deep dark people sporting multicolor lense, we should know they don’t overstand how horrific they look. This is not the fashion attire of a confident person who feels attractive. It is the fashion attire of a low self esteem having person, who feels very unattractive. I overstand that through blood mixing some of us do come out with light eyes. And the rare ones who produce sets of eyes like that are also a product of genetic defect.
Mixed girl...
This is nothing a person can just change. But the way light eyes are pursued, at one time the escape of the kneegress, seem to be catching on by the kneegrow. Now both genders look the damn fool. Have we forgotten how we look pursuing light skin? And ended up bleaching off our whole skin and creating pools of hideous looking zombies?
Unless you can show me a whole village, town or even family with deep coal dark skin, with blue eyes, then your love for the one off, is more pathetic and unfortunate than those born with that weakness. And no…Vanessa Williams and Jesse Williams are not the example I am looking for. I am talking about groups of Manute Bol’s running around with blue eyes.
The language we use to describe the light eyes is also very instructive. High color, browning, sexy…etc. This is what the pathology of colorism looks like. It is a pathology because instead of saying or implying that that light skin man or woman is attractive, they should be saying that man or woman is attractive. Because to say it any other way is stating that the man or woman is attractive because they have light skin.  A twist of words goes a long way in how we express ourselves, but we must first eliminate that twist in our perception of what is beauty, else our objectivity is questioned.
Colorism! One of the worst kind of infection, because we don’t see it, nor are we aware that we are infected by it. Even as it kills our Afrikan soul and Afrikan self love.
This article is written by BlackmyStory