Pan African Proclamation of 2016

RBG Man...

Hotep family! It’s your brother KP.  I hope everyone is doing well.  I enjoyed my little break from posting. I thought this would be a good post for my return. Here at Kushite Kingdom I have always promoted  the idea of being Pan African. As well as covering topics like Black consciousness,economics,African culture and Black liberation. In exposing the lies that we are told about our history, I’ve tried my best to wake up my people. Many of us get so much disinformation in the media we are very confused.  That’s why I do my best to get out important information to my people. Even if I offend other races in the process. Offending people is not my concern.   If I was scared to offend others I would’ve stop blogging a long time ago.The survival of my people is my main concern.  I have always believed  that black consciousness was a spiritual path based on health,wellness amd knowledge of self. Black consciousness is appreciation for our African heritage,our people and families. And real  power is about determination and self control.  You can call this a proclamation,manifesto,mission statement or public declaration.  But I just wanted to list some ideas and things we as black people should be doing if we want to survive as well as change our mindset.  We have a lot of work ahead of us.  But together we can do this.  I’m sure some of you will like some of it…and others will disagree.  But that’s okay. I’m open to any suggestions anyone may have.

Pan African Flag..

  1. Promote Black Love
  2. Reject ideologies that have European origins
  3. Do not celebrate European holidays(White Gods)
  4. Learn a trade or skill to empower your people
  5. Teach African culture and Black History to your children. And how it can be used as an instrument of Power
Books
6. Study biology and genetics. Learn about your African bloodline.
7.Accept the harsh reality that biracial people are not black
8.Realize that you must sacrifice so that others can be free
9. To live with honor and integrity
10. Must understand that healing means we no longer allow trauma to control our lives
11. Do not engage in sexual activity with non-blacks
12. Stand for justice and equality
Heroes...
13. Learn about great African heroes such as Marcus Garvey,Nat Turner,Queen Nzinga,Shaka Zulu,Thomas Sankara,Steve Biko,Harriet Tubman,Dutty Boukman,Patrice Lumumba,Martin Delany,Edward Blyden,Alexander Crummel,Assata Shakur,Mansa Musa,Malcolm X and Jean Jacques Dessalines. Appreciate their greatness but also learn from their mistakes.
14. Read The Blueprint for Black Power by Amos Wilson(then get all his books)
15. Read The Destruction of Black Civilizations by Chancellor Williams(then get all his books)
16. Read books by black scholars such as John Henrik Clarke,Queen Afua, Kwame Ture,Marimba Ani,Jewel Pookrum,Dr Sebi,Umar Johnson,Llaila Afrika,Bobby E.Wright …among others.
17. Reject European standards of beauty and uplift African Beauty
Black woman..
18.Trust your ancestors and your instincts
19. Support Black businesses
20.Learn how to fish and hunt
21.Grow your own food
22.Learn to speak and write an African language
23.Learn how to read a map and use a compass
24.  Don’t be violent towards black homosexuals,transgenders and lesbians. Live and let live.  But realize that it is not conducive behavior for African people.
25.Understand that homosexuality,bestiality,lesbianism and pedophilia is sexual perversion.
Tomiko..
26. Do not be slut or whore.  It is very self destructive  and shows your immaturity. This applies to women….and men.
27. Assume that all non-blacks do not have your best interest in mind.
28. Brothers: Do not display a misogynistic mindset. Hating and despising black women shows ignorance and no growth as a man.  You must learn to respect your woman. Let sistas express themselves although it is okay to disagree at times. But give sistas their space.
29. Sistas: Do not be a man hating feminist.  Do not put down or degrade your man. Use words of encouragement to uplift your man.  And realize that men want to be leaders. Every gender has their role and should compliment the other gender.  A relationship is a partnership that both can benefit from.
30.  You must realize that the masculine principle  and feminine principle compliment one another. And that black men and women must work together to strengthen the family unit.

Militant Mulattoes: Jesse Williams,Zaza Ali and J. Cole

Jesse Williams...

This past Sunday was the BET Awards.  It’s a celebration of black music,television and film.  I used to watch the award show years ago but it doesn’t hold my interest much anymore.  Mainly because the show promotes music that denigrates black women,colorism,negative images of black people and all around anti-blackness. But yesterday all over the news they were covering a speech given by biracial actor Jesse Williams.  He was given the Humanitarian Award and gave a passionate speech about racism ,oppression,police brutality and cultural appropriation.  That’s a lot to cover under four minutes.  Williams is an actor on the ABC drama Grey’s Anatomy. Some fear he may lose his job for speaking out on these issues.  I highly doubt he will lose his job. If anything he will be praised for speaking on these issues.  Here’s what he said:

This is for the real organizers all over the country, the activist, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do. It’s kinda basic mathematics: the more we learn about who we are and how we got here the more we will mobilize.

“This award is also for the black women in particular who have spent their lives nurturing everyone before themselves – we can and will do better for you.

“Now, what we’ve been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to de-escalate, disarm and not kill white people every day. So what’s going to happen is we’re going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function and ours.

“I got more, y’all. Yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice’s 14th birthday so I don’t want to hear any more about how far we’ve come when paid public servants can pull a drive-by on a 12-year-old playing alone in a park in broad daylight, killing him on television, and then going home to make a sandwich.

“Tell Rekia Boyd how it’s so much better to live in 2012 than 1612 or 1712. Tell that to Eric Garner, Sandra Bland.

“The thing is though, all of us here are getting money, that alone isn’t going to stop this. Dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back to put someone’s brand on our body – when we spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies, and now we pray to get paid for brands on our bodies?

“There has been no war that we have not fought and died on the front lines of. There is no job we haven’t done, there is no tax they haven’t levied against us, and we have paid all of them.

“But freedom is always conditional here. ‘You’re free!’ they keeping telling us. ‘But she would be alive if she hadn’t acted so … free.’ Now, freedom is always coming in the hereafter, but the hereafter is a hustle: We want it now.

“Let’s get a couple of things straight. The burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander – that’s not our job so let’s stop with all that. If you have a critique for our resistance then you’d better have an established record, a critique of our oppression.

“If you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do: sit down.

“We’ve been floating this country on credit for centuries, and we’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil – black gold! – ghettoizing and demeaning our creations and stealing them, gentrifying our genius and then trying us on like costumes before discarding our bodies like rinds of strange fruit.

“Just because we’re magic doesn’t mean we’re not real.

“Thank you.”

It was a decent speech and he touched on a lot of issues.  But I noticed when they showed his parents in the audience I noticed his white mother.  I think this causes a lot of confusion for black people.  Can you be pro-black with a white parent? This is something I’ve noticed over the last few years.  There are many biracial people coming out speaking on the black struggle.  Many biracial people have gotten the spotlight in the entertainment and sports world.

Drake...

Canadian rapper Drake is one of the biggest rappers in the industry right now. This is his white mother,Sandi.

Alicia...

Grammy award winning singer/actress  Alicia Keys has spoken on issues that affect the black community.  Even though her mother Terria is a white woman.

J Cole1..

Rapper J. Cole gets a lot of praise for dropping socially conscious lyrics. This pic is of him and his mother Kay.

Bob Marley..

Some people tend to forget but legendary reggae singer Bob Marley sang about black unity and African people.  Even though he  had a white father.

Zaza...

On the black conscious circuit there is a biracial woman named Zaza Ali.  I first be familiar with her back in 2013.  She was doing a radio show with rapper Professor Griff.  She touched on issues such as black empowerment,religion,feminism,racism and politics.  She became quite popular in a short time.  Since then she and Griff have parted ways.  And she is now doing lectures and selling dvd’s and books.  I got the felling she was using Griff to get to the next level on the lecture circuit.  Also I think she knows that her light skin,white features and “good hair” will attract more attention then the darker skinned black women.  She is using the fact that many black people are self loathing and will fawn over her looks.  And she has become quite successful in the process. Many people believe she was a fraud from the beginning.  I also heard that she dated Griff and the broke up after she was down with him.  I can’t say I’m surprised at all.  Shame on Griff for falling for it.

In this video(above) Zaza is confronted by a caller on a radio show.  The caller asks her can she truly be against white supremacy if she has a white mother.  You will notice in the video that Zaza never answers the question.  I’m not really surprised at her response.  This also goes back to the Jesse Williams speech.  Can you really fight this racist system if your parent is white?  How can you give 100% against white racism if you came from a white vagina?  I don’t think it’s really possible. A mother is the first person a baby learns to love.  Your mother fed you and cared for you as a baby. Now you’re going to fight against the people who look just like her. NO way in Hell is that going to happen.  Black people need major systematic change for the empowerment of how our people.  And I just don’t think most biracial/mixed people are going to go all the way when the time comes. Also  Jesse Williams is working on a documentary about the Black Lives Matters movement. I have already covered how BLM is funded by rich white folks.  Any movement funded by your open enemy will not liberate you.  Always remember that.

https://kushiteprince.wordpress.com/2015/08/05/black-lives-matter-black-power-or-gay-rights-movement/

So while it was nice that Williams spoke out against white racism it is nothing new.  Marcus Garvey spoke about that decades ago.  Williams talked about police brutality.  Kwame Toure did that years ago. So let’s not act like Williams is the next Malcolm X.  He brought up issues that should be brought up but he said nothing new. It’s just that he was given a large platform to say it to millions of people so it’s getting a lot of hype.  You must also keep in mind that BET is owned by Viacom. The president is a white man named Philippe Dauman. This speech was planned in advance.  They already knew what he was going to say.  This was no surprise. They used this opportunity to stir up some controversy and get people talking.  And it worked.  Black people get excited when we hear some truth don’t we?  But I believe that hearing pro-black rhetoric is more palatable when coming from biracial people.  It’s more acceptable by whites when they hear it from them because they know they have a white parent.  So they don’t take it that seriously.  And many black people suffer from low self esteem so we like hearing this language from someone with light skin,straight hair and light colored eyes.  And Jesse knew what he was doing when he shouted out the black women.  Many black women in the audience were standing up clapping.  I’m sure many of them were fawning over his light skinned ambiguous looks. Much the same way Zaza Ali many times will come down hard on black women.  And she will talk about black men in a positive light.  And of course many black men in the conscious community fawn over her and call her a “real Black queen”.  Do you see the pattern?  I’m telling you,these biracial people know exactly what they’re doing.  I understand they can’t help their parent is a white person. They have no control over that.  But I just wonder why they are given a platform to speak so often on black issues.  They are not of majority African descent.  They maybe non-whte but that doesn’t automatically make them black either. So what do you think? Should they be given a platform to speak for us?  And also can they be genuine in the struggle…if they have a white parent?

https://blackmystory.wordpress.com/2016/06/29/what-the-jessie-williams-speech-at-the-bet-awards-tells-me/#comment-35102

 

 

Stokely Speaks: Black Power to Pan Africanism

Stokely speaks...

This remarkable collection of speeches and essays originally published in 1971 by one of the significant figures to emerge during the civil rights struggle of the 1960s in the United States, has been re-issued in a time period where the ideas put forward between 1965-1971 are just as important today as they were then. The questions of who is qualified to run society and government, the role of resistance in the struggle for genuine democracy, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the role of people in the west in regard to revolutions taking place in the so-called Third World and Pan-Africanism.

With a forward by award-winning journalist from death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal, the book illustrates that it is not only a historical document but a living work in the service of not only understanding the past but bringing its weight to the contemporary challenges faced by conscious people in the 21st Century. In addition, Bob Brown’s preface to this new issue lends the credibility needed from someone who was influenced heavily by Carmichael (Ture) and worked closely with him for over three decades.

Mumia’s points to the importance of the book from someone who was younger than Carmichael but who was influenced by the political tendencies that he was instrumental in developing. Jamal was a member of the Philadelphia Chapter of the Black Panther Party from 1968. He admits that the split within the Black Panther Party in 1969 tainted his earlier view of Carmichael. However, he regrets that things were not different and that how much stronger the revolutionary movement may have been if these differences had not become antagonistic:

” …what would history have been if Ture did not leave the Party? What if the Party was big enough, strong enough, mature enough to include his insights into their own? Ture writes (in “Pan-Africanism”) of the “ideological issues” that separated him from the Party. Although he is not explicit, the issue was working with white radicals, something Ture found untenable. Ironically, the ideological positions between Huey P. Newton and Stokely Carmichael were perhaps closer than first thought. As early as 1971, Newton recognized that the Party’s work with white radicals was unproductive, for “White radicals did not give us access to the White community.” One cannot read Stokely’s trenchant analysis of white liberalism without coming to the same conclusion (see his January 1969 speech, “The Pitfalls of Liberalism”).”

As early as 1966, Carmichael was articulating a view that foresaw the protracted nature of national and class politics in the United States. During the recent period there have been vicious attacks on the political gains made by Africans in America during the civil rights and black power movements of the 1950s through the 1970s. Illustrating this clearly is the recent passage in the state of Michigan of a ballot initiative that changed the constitution to effectively outlaw affirmative action. This took place in the aftermath of a Supreme Court decision in 2003 upholding in principle of the use of race as a deciding factor in both undergraduate and graduate/professional school admissions.

The central role of education in the process of national discrimination or institutional racism is pointed out in the essay entitled: “Who Is Qualified?” originally published in the January 8, 1966 issue of the New Republic. It was written at a time when Carmichael was organizing in Lowndes County, Alabama where the first Black Panther Party was formed with the explicit purpose of building an independent political force backed up by the armed will of the people to defend themselves against racist terror.

In regard to the undemocratic character of the distribution of educational resources in the United States, Carmichael writes that: “The panacea for lack of opportunity is education, as is the panacea for prejudice. But just how available is it? If every sixteen-year-old in the nation were motivated to attend high school, he could not: there are not enough schools, not enough physical space. As for college, less than one-quarter of the population ever gets there. The financial barrier is too high; even the cheapest state college charges fees which are impossible for the poor. Scholarships serve only the gifted. To make matters worse, many universities and colleges are already fighting off the mob by making entry more difficult. It is getting harder, not easier, for the poor to be included here. For the Negro, there is an additional problem. He is not psychologically attuned to think of college as a goal. Society has taught him to set short sights for himself, and so he does.”

In the essay entitled: “Power and Racism”, which initially appeared in the New York Review of Books in September of 1966, explains how this structural oppression of African people spawns resistance. He criticizes the purported non-violent character of the civil rights movement in the early 1960s. He points to the dialetical relationship between the government’s response to the demands of the movement during its early phase to the eruption of urban rebellions which he explains are the natural outcome of the lack of response to peaceful protests:

“None of its so-called leaders could go into a rioting community and be listened to. In a sense, I blame ourselves–together with the mass media–for what has happened in Watts, Harlem, Chicago, Cleveland and Omaha. Each time the people in those cities saw Martin Luther King get slapped, they became angry; when they saw four little black girls bombed to death, they were angrier; and when nothing happened, they were steaming. We had nothing to offer that they could see, except to go out and be beaten again. We helped build their frustration.”

In providing a working definition of black power as an ideology and political program to counter the perceived weakness of the civil rights movement, Carmichael says later on in this same essay “Power and Racism” that: “This is what they seek: control. Where Negroes lack a majority, Black Power means proper representation and sharing of control. It means the creation of power bases from which black people can work to change statewide or nationwide patterns of oppression through pressure from strength–instead of weakness. Politically, Black Power means what it has always meant to SNCC: the coming together of black people to elect representatives and to force those representatives to speak to their needs. It does not mean merely putting black faces into office. A man or woman who is black and from the slums cannot be automatically expected to speak to the needs of black people. Most of the black politicians we see around the country today are not what SNCC means by Black Power. The power must be that of a community, and emanate from there.”

Some four decades later Africans in America have not realized this form of politics which is first and foremost designed to serve the immediate interests and needs of the community. In addition, to the domestic agenda involving education, political power and self-organization, the foreign policy of the United States reflects the internal racism and national oppression against Africans and other oppressed peoples. This is why Carmichael would accept an invitation to address the First Conference of the Organization of Latin American Solidarity in Cuba during July of 1967.

Carmichael begins this chapter entitled: “Solidarity With Latin America”, by stating forthrightly that Africans in the United States share common interests with the peoples of South America and its environs. He says that: “We share with you a common struggle, it becomes increasingly clear; we have a common enemy. Our enemy is white Western imperialist society. Our struggle is to overthrow this system that feeds itself and expands itself through the economic and cultural exploitation of non-white, non-Western peoples–of the Third World.”

These words are still relevant today in light of the continuing threats by US imperialism against the sovereignty of the Cuban Revolution. This lack of respect for Cuban independence is also represented by the continuing occupation of Guantanamo Bay as a naval base on that Caribbean island. One of the most egregious violations of human rights and the dignity of people has been the existence of torture camps where hundreds are held without charge or trial.

In the continental United States a burgeoning immigrant rights movement during 2006 has exploded and opened new avenues for solidarity and mass struggle. The resurrection of May Day in the country where it was formed has once again in the 21st Century been made a reality by recent immigrants as it was during the 19th Century with immigrants from Germany, Ireland and other European nations.

In another significant solidarity effort that has remained essential from the 1960s to the 21st Century is of course the question of the Palestinian’s right of return as well as national independence through the realization of a independent state for the Palestinian people. Carmichael in his address to the Organization of Arab Students in Ann Arbor, Michigan in August of 1968, he lays out the case for African-American solidarity with the Palestinian Revolution. He offers a serious critique of Zionism and the role of the propaganda put forward by this movement that seeks to win sympathy for the continued occupation of Palestinian land and the denial of self-determination for this oppressed and colonized people.

Carmichael says that:”Zionists have a very effective, offensive propaganda. They state their propaganda and everyone accepts it as the truth and they put on the defensive anyone who tries to even question their propaganda by calling him anti-Semitic. It’s a very, very good trick: nobody wants to be anti-Semitic, nobody wants to hate people merely because of their race. The way we found to counteract the offensive propaganda of the Zionists is to state our propaganda, and state it offensively, and state ours as the truth, and not bow down or question or quibble with the Zionists’ propaganda; that is the only way we have found to be able to deal with them. If the Zionists assert that they have a right to Israel, then we assert that the Palestinians have a right to Palestine. And once we assert that, there is never room for discussion. But once we assert that the Palestinians have a right to Palestine because it belongs to them, then there can be room for discussion in this country. That is precisely what we did: try very hard to calculate assertions that would for once put the Zionists on the defensive in this country and let them back up their so-called State of Israel, which we all know to be an unjust and certainly immoral state.”

In 2006 there was the blanket bombing of southern Lebanon by Israel. The United States Senate passed a resolution without opposition supporting this military action that was condemned by people throughout the region and to an increasing degree by popular organizations inside this country. It is the funding from American taxpayers that supply the F-15 and F-16 fighter planes which bomb Lebanon under the guise of fighting the falsely-labelled Hezbullah Party as terrorists.

Even a former US President is attacked by the pro-Israeli lobby and sections of the ruling class for publishing a book describing the social system in occupied Palestine as apartheid-like in its character. Consequently, the notion of solidarity between Africans in the United States and Palestinians goes to heart of challenging the imperialist’s aim of dominating the middle-east through the notion of protecting the security of Israel, a settler-colonial state.

By 1969, Carmichael had re-located in the west African nation of Guinea-Conakry, then under the leadership of the Democratic Party of Guinea (PDG) headed by President Ahmed Sekou Toure. Pan-Africanism utilizes as a principle tenet the international character of the black struggle, the identity of these peoples as Africans and the unity of peoples of African descent around the world.

In a “Message from Guinea” sent in the form of a letter to the founding meeting of the Malcolm X Liberation University in Durham, North Carolina in October of 1969, Carmichael states that: “Now, we must recognize that black people, whether we are in Durham, San Francisco, Jamaica, Trinidad, Brazil, Europe or on the mother continent, are all an African people. We are Africans, there can be no quesiton about that. We came from Africa, our is African…. We have all suffered the same oppression at the hands of white folks, whether in Lynchburg, Virginia; Money, Mississippi; Accra, Ghana; or Johannesburg, South Africa.”

Carmichael views Pan-Africanism as the highest expression of Black Power. Here the evolution is complete from civil rights and black power to the realization that the liberation of Africa is key to the world-wide freedom of all peoples who share the continent as a homeland.

The reprinting of this book comes as an enormous contribution to the ongoing ideological and political discussion among African peoples related to their continuing quest for genuine human emancipation. This book provides the opportunity for an ancestor to speak from the whirlwind, to provide encouragement and guidance to the developing struggle for qualitative change and social transformation.

Review by Abayomi Azikiwe

The Attack on Black Masculinity continues……..

Time Magazine
Well look who made the cover of Time magazine. This person is “actress” Laverne Cox. Laverne is the first transgender person on the cover of Time magazine. Laverne is on the television show Orange is the New Black. A show that glorifies prison life. The title of the show alone should tell you they’re trying to insult and degrade black people. But this post is not really about that show. This post is about a pattern I keep on seeing in the media. It seems the mainstream media really wants to redefine black masculinity. They want to reshape the image of black men. That’s why you keep seeing all these “gay firsts” that just happen to be black men. This is being force fed on the black community. And I am really getting sick of it! I found this agenda a slap in the face to ALL black men! The media wants the whole world to see black men as limp-wrist sissies. A laughing stock for the whole world. I think many of these gay black men are being prompted to come out. I know there are plenty of white and Hispanic gay men in the sports and entertainment. But this onslaught of gay black men in the media is ridiculous.
Let’s take a look at what’s been going on the last few years.

Jason Collins
This is NBA player Jason Collins. He came out last year and the media went nuts over him. Everyone in the media called him a hero. Hmmm…..so sleeping with a man makes you a hero?? Utter nonsense!!

Michael Sam
Then of course we have NFL player Michael Sam.This guy is pretty much everywhere. The guy is a mediocre player at best. Heck,he was picked 294th in the NFL draft! Not exactly a superstar.lol But of course he sleeps with men so that automatically makes him a hero in the eyes of the media. Some have even called him the “Jackie Robinson of the NFL”. What the ???? What an insult to the legacy of Jackie. But just another way to connect the struggle of blacks to homosexuals. Which I have explained before that the two are NOT alike. But the media keeps on trying to equate the two. The media is controlled by demonic people!


Then we have WWE wrestler Darren Young. He announced he was a homosexual last year. Here he is having an interview with Ellen DeGenerate. Oops!! I mean Ellen DeGeneres.lol I’m sure this guy was prompted by the powers that be to come out. And I don’t think he’ll be the last. This is a pattern that will go on and on. But we have to let it be known that we don’t condone this behavior. And these men should not be looked upon as heroes in our community. Men like Malcolm X,Marcus Garvey,Patrice Lumumba,Huey Newton,Amos Wilson and Kwame Ture is who our young black men should look up to. Not a bunch of homosexuals who sold out their people to push an agenda by their oppressors. Hollywood wants men in dresses,acting feminine and playing homosexuals. And sports is now doing their part to destroy the image of a strong black man. Everyone knows that sports is a place men can display their skills,quickness and strength. It’s also very much associated with masculinity. So this is their last ditch effort to show that even though a man can look strong and tough—-he can still be a homosexual. And who better than to push this sick agenda?? The man that’s looked upon as the strongest,toughest,fastest warrior on the planet. The BLACK MAN.


Thank GOD we have warriors like Mwalimu Baruti unafraid to speak the truth. He gives me hope. And helps me to remain from going insane.

The Butler- Why are we still playing butlers and maids?

Butler
On August 16 a new film will be released. The Butler is just the latest film in Hollywood propaganda. It’s the story of a butler(Cecil Gaines) who served eight presidents from 1952-1986.The producers made sure to put a lot of black celebrities in it so that black people will flock to the theaters in droves. It stars Forest Whitaker as the main character,Cecil Gaines. With Oprah Winfrey playing his wife.It also stars Lenny Kravitz,Cuba Gooding Jr,David Oyelowo,Terrence Howard and Yaya Alafia. Even Mariah Carey has a small cameo in the film. Don’t worry though,there are white people in the film as well. We don’t want people to think this is a “black film”. Most of the white men in the film are playing the Presidents. Actors like Alan Rickman,Liev Schreiber,Robin Williams and James Mardsen.And of course this film is by director Lee “Monster’s Ball” Daniels. This homosexual self-hating director is doing everything he can to degrade the image of black people. If Monster’s Ball and Precious weren’t enough,now we have this garbage in theaters. There are so many great uplifting stories to tell black children. There are great black heroes and African heroes in our history. We had civilizations long before we ever had contact with Europeans. Hollywood makes great films that put their history in a positive light. Stories about the Romans and Greek empires. They make films that give them a sense of pride showing themselves as great warriors. Films like Gladiator,Lords of the Rings,Alexander and 300. And what do we get. Think Like a Man? Booty Call? Barbershop? Madea Goes to Jail?? This is a disgrace! And Hollywood is very slick. They know black people will most likely see this film if they hype it up enough and put big black stars in it. Please do NOT spend your money on this film. We have to let our voices be heard. Let Hollywood know that we are hip to this game they’re playing with us. They keep making films like this to keep us in a subservient mindset. Don’t fall for it.
They keep telling us that times have changed. Have they really changed? Back in the 20’s and 30’s black women like Hattie McDaniel had to play maids. I realize the acting opportunities were limited back then.
The Help1
If that’s true then how do you explain films like The Help?
The Help2
We don’t want to admit it but nothing has really changed. This is nothing but the refinement of white supremacy. We are still playing maids,butlers,thugs,pimps,whores,gang members and drug dealers. What makes this film so bad is how they try to gloss it up like playing a butler is so regal and grand. I watched the trailer and they play this moving sentimental music in it. I had to hold back my laughter. I could hardly keep a straight face. And I’ve watched some of the interviews with the black actors in this film. Look at this video of Cuba Gooding Jr and Lenny Kravitz. It’s really funny watching these two clowns try to explain how playing a butler is such a honor. See how long you can watch it before you start laughing.

Another thing I noticed in the trailer is actor David Oyelowo plays the son of Forest Whitaker. He gets involved in the civil rights movement and eventually becomes militant and joins the Black Panthers. Needless to say,he and his father don’t see eye to eye politically. There’s a scene at the dinner table where he and his father get into an argument. He insults his father and then his mother(Oprah Winfrey) slaps him across the face! She then tells him “Everything you have is because of that butler!” It’s a very powerful scene. But it’s also very telling. By having the mother slap the militant son it’s telling black people to not fight back. The son is portrayed as the villain and is not following the “right path”. The film is telling black people to be more like the butler. In other words,black people should not fight back but just be quiet and obey your white oppressors. We should “suffer in silence”. This is white supremacy and Hollywood propaganda at it’s finest.
Some might say that I’m overreacting because I haven’t seen the film. But I don’t have to see it to know it’s propaganda. I’ve seen Hollywood do this time and time again. And I’m really quite sick of it. I’m tired of seeing my people portrayed this way. Films like this are nothing but mind control. And all these black actors know it as well. But they just want a paycheck. Here’s a video from a brother named Solomon on Youtube. I totally agree with his all his points about this film.

The truth is we need our own film studios. That way we can write and produce the stories we want to tell. And when I say studios I’m talking about black owned and operated film production companies. Tyler Perry has his own film company and Oprah Winfrey has her cable station OWN. But they are still backed by white/Jewish owners. Which means if Oprah or Tyler tried to tell a story that was too powerful,positive and uplifting about black people—their white slave owners could tell them not to make it. I must be telling the truth because look at the irrelevant material that Oprah and Tyler produce. Tyler with his silly sitcoms that reinforce negative black stereotypes. And Oprah doing her exclusive interviews with Lance Armstrong and Rihanna. These are topics that are totally irrelevant to the struggles of black people. We are facing unemployment,suicide,drug addiction,police brutality,genocide,AIDS and imprisonment. Meanwhile Oprah is interviewing Lindsay Lohan?! Come on Oprah, get with it!
Like I said that means we need independent studios so no one can tell us what stories to tell or how to tell it. There are so many stories about black doctors,teachers,inventors and scientists that could be told. Where are the big motion pictures about Ida B. Wells,Dred Scott,Booker T. Washington,Charles Drew,Adam Clayton Powell Jr,Martin Delaney,Kwame Ture,Althea Gibson,Marcus Garvey,Harriet Tubman,Madame C.J. Walker and Fannie Lou Hamer? Where are the films about great Africans like Askia Toure,Queen Tiye,Yaa Asantewa,Idris Alooma,Taharka,Funmilayo Ransome Kuti,Kwame Nkrumah,Queen Nzinga,Khufu and Queen Nefertiti? We should be proud of such a rich and beautiful history. We have a history of black men and women who fought for justice,truth and black liberation. We can’t expect our oppressors to tell the stories of our people in the correct manner. If anything they will most likely alter and distort the legacies of our great leaders,teachers and freedom fighters. Now after looking at this short list of great black people in history I ask you again…..Why are we still playing butlers and maids?