Rapper Nipsey Hussle killed! But why?

Nip1..

he term “Hustle” in the online variations of a dictionary, carries 15 deferent explanations. However the one that stood out to me for this article explains hustle as having “busy movement and activity”. The term was first used in the late 17th century (originally in the sense ‘shake or toss’). It originated from Middle Dutch hutselen. Hustle became a household verb and or noun dating from the early 20th century and in today’s urban lingo (another name for black people talk), to hustle is to have the courage, confidence, self belief and self-determination to go out there ( in the world) and work for whatever you want, until you find the successes you want in life.

Sometime on Sunday March 31st, a young hustler, an Eritrean-American by the name of Ermias Davidson Asghedom , was murdered outside his place of business in Compton California. Like many who grew up in that part of Los Angles, young black men usually had a passion for sports or music, as a way to get out of the crushing poverty and racism of amurdikkka’s and California’s discrepancies in social and economic classes. And like most of these young men looking to change their circumstances, getting resources was tough, especially since Asghedom left his mother’s house at 14 to live with his grandmother. Asghedom said he got involved in street life as he tried to support himself, and he joined the gang Rollin 60’s Neighborhood Crips as a teenager. It was there he choose the moniker Nipsey Hustle and got into rapping and songwriting. Emerging from the West Coast hip hop scene in the mid-2000s, He initially became known for his numerous mixtapes, including his Bullets Ain’t Got No Name series, The Marathon, The Marathon Continues and Crenshaw, the latter of which rapper Jay-Z, bought 100 copies for $100 each. After much delay, his début studio album Victory Lap was released in February 2018 to critical acclaim and commercial success, and was nominated for Best Rap Album at the 61st Annual Grammy Awards in 2019. All this before he reached 33 years of age But more important than all of that, Nipsey Hustle overstood the Afurakan concept of “If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together”.

Hustle believed whole heartedly in giving back to the streets and community that supported his rise to the top, without the oppression of record companies and agents who always look to syphon off the energies and blood of talented artists to engorged themselves. Outside of music, Nipsey Hussle said he wanted to provide hope and motivation to those who grew up in Crenshaw like him, and pay it forward. In that vein, being a strong businessman, the rapper and business partner Dave Gross purchased the Crenshaw plaza where his Marathon Clothing store is located, and had plans to knock it down and “rebuild it as a six-story residential building atop a commercial plaza where a revamped Marathon store will be the anchor tenant.” Think about this for a moment. He just bought a whole strip mall, a strip mall he used to hustle his mixed tape in front off, out of the trunk of his car. He was about to open a co-working space and teach financial literacy to the disenfranchised of the Compton neighborhood of Crenshaw. Yet Some unknown gun man killed him and wounded two others standing close by. Apparently in front of his wife and daughter. I hope the last wasn’t true, because that would be very disturbing and traumatic for them. According to numerous reactions Hustle was killed because he was about to make a documentary on murdered Afurakan herbalist-nutritionists Dr. Sebi and his trial for claiming ( and proving) to cure people of AIDS. Many counter reactions by kneegrows…the cave monkey don’t count…was that the conspiracy theorists are out with their tin foil hats. Below is a video he did with the breakfast club recently.

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Now I am not here to praise this rapper or worship him as a celebrity. That’s not my style. I am however shocked at the seemingly senseless murder of a man who by all accounts was doing some much and putting back so much into a community lacking much positive media spotlight or positive anything. After all Compton is notorious for being the origin of the Crips and later Blood, a fratricidal gang of lost men and boys, that was created in 1969. Compton is a place infamous for its violent gangs and dirty streets. Extending from the remains of a once prosperous suburban community, in the uncaring eyes of most of this shit hole country, Compton has become a broken city, reflected through its society and reputation. The poverty-stricken South Central LA area is now recognized nationwide by one thing, and one thing only. Its gangs. But what led to the rise of the prominent Crips and Bloods? Many middle-class Afurakan citizens of amurdikkka started moving to Compton, from the South to escape Jim Crow abuses, but also to seek job opportunities in the North and West of the country. Many ended up in this predominately white community. For a long time Compton’s population was mostly white and today still boasts a fair amount of white Americans. Making up about 16% of the current population, although that is not very commonly known. The addition of Afurakan citizens of amurdikkka changed the demographic of Compton, but that did not go over well with Europeans. Afurakan were far from accepted with open arms and faced a lot of discrimination and racism. The City Council even tried dismantling the Compton Police Department in order to exclude Afurakan…from law enforcement. All of this set the precedent for the racial injustice that would continue to buildup through time in Compton.


Police assaults, as well as the encouragement of assaults by citizens without any punishment, weighed heavy on the spirits of a people who only wanted to live their life without stress. The racial unrest that still continues today has greatly influenced what Compton has become. As it became more and more of a Afurakan community, Compton saw a great economic decline, as business and employment moved out of the neighbourhoods, which escalated even more after the conclusion of WWII. Many were left jobless and poverty rose. Unfortunately, it would just get worse from there. Due to the fact that Compton was now a predominantly Afurakan community it received much less help from the County and the State than other cities where a majority where white did. This racism and inequality not only damped the economy, but due to the fact that having Afurakan neighbors was considered a bad thing, property values plummeted as well. More than a few young men came together to protect their neighbourhoods from roving bands of citizens and undercover race soldiers, who history has shown us, always swoop down on Afurakans to sow terror among. Compton’s situation continued to drastically worsen and after most white people and jobs left the area, many started to turn to crime and drugs looking for an economic solution. This is the reason gang culture became so prominent here and in other depressed cities. The most notorious gang was the Crips, who sought to fill the void left after the dismantling of the Black Panther Party by Nazi Ronald Ray-gun and the vipers of California’s Gestapo police force. The mixture of racial unrest and economic depression was just enough to set the right atmosphere for gangs to arise. Gangs were a simple, dangerous, adrenalin filled way of making cash. They could deal drugs, rob people and stores, and come up with a healthy profit. Many frustrated youth turned to this system.
Like everything else the children of slaves touched, without a cultural foundation it often turned to shit! The gangs that formed decided to fight AGAINST each other for survival instead of uniting against the government and outside forces, bent on eliminating them or had suppressed them before. Herbert Anthony Stevens, better know by his stage name “Ab-Soul,” is a rapper from Los Angeles who hypothesized in his song “Terrorist Threats,” “If all the gangs in the world unified, we’d stand a chance against the military tonight.” Instead it seemed gangs formed rivalries and worked to try to out due each other in terms of territory and revenue. What I find interesting is not that Nipsey Hustle was doing a documentary on Dr. Sebi. No…what I find interesting is two-fold. First, he was providing economic relief and hope for a whole neighbourhood. He expected to teach and train future leaders and entrepreneurs to break stereotypes and eventually compete on their own merit. Now that is a powerful vision. Hustle had influenced so many people, even those not in his circle, because he was one of a very few who reached back to help his brother and sister up. The other interesting thing I read was that he was shot in the head. From a far distance. Anybody who does gun training, including military or police training, will tell you a head shot is a very skilled and difficult thing from a distance. None of the survivors saw a gun man. There was no drive by. Which is prompting the police to score street cameras and asking for assistance. This could only mean that the shooter was a distance away. Somewhere in sniper distance. Kneegrows don’t do sniper shit, unless they are ex military or police snipers themselves. We usually do a drive by, ride by or run up and spray everybody, sometimes hitting people we didn’t mean to hit. Yet a head shot? With two other people wounded for effect?
Things that make you go mmmmm?
Rapper Nas mourned Hussle’s death on Instagram and wrote, “It’s dangerous to be an MC. Dangerous to be a b-ball player. It’s dangerous to have money. Dangerous To Be A Black Man.” Somebody else mentioned that this echoes “the same pattern, (where) someone comes along trying to enlighten and change the cycle and they’re killed. Every time….” If you follow the bouncing ball and recall that last year the story broke that Latino gangs were brought in by local authority to kill, burn and bomb out black neighbourhoods to make them unlivable.

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And it has high value real estate. Compton is one such area that through gentrification could be a boon and boost for white or non black business and residence to swoop in and take advantage of another “abandoned black neighborhood”. Teaching black people to take back their community is trending right now. It’s however a dangerous trend to people who see real estate as the ultimate base of power.
Real Estate: from the Latin Real (Royal) Estate (land). Real Estate and the fight over it, has caused more wars and family break ups than trade wars or vagina ( Helen of Troy any one?) has ever done. During the rise of European Feudalism, which corresponded with the demise of the European Monarchy, land was leased out to tenants to farm and lived on, but never owned. I once sat in a lecture on entrepreneurship where the speaker mentioned that for McDonald’s…yes that one…wealth is not in their restaurant, but in the real estate they were able to purchase to put the restaurants on. Banks are notorious for owning the land they sit on and rarely if ever sell that property. Preferring to rent or lease any business on that former bank site. Real Estate and the need to own land, has been the boon and bane of many cultures not respectful of land sharing. None more so than the Europeans. It was Real Estate or land that made them come west to Turtle Island and surrounding lands. Some where searching for gold and diamonds, but many wanted land to have a new start in life. And didn’t mind killing a few black people along the way.
Read that last line again.

Nip4..

Even today in Afuraka, the South Pacific, the Caribbean and South America, white people stealing lands and displacing the owners in order to mine, live on or place business on, is as naturally as them breathing air. After the great perversion that was chattel slavery was legal ended in order to remove the wealth of the plantation owners for the new wealth of the industrialists, black people were promised and never given their forty acres and a mule to fight the tribal war for the North against its redder neck cousin, in the South. And when we went west or north to find land, we inevitably were burned out, run out or murdered out right for the lands. And most of the time this was done with the direct and indirect support of local, state or federal governments. Ourstory is filled with such tales. None more egregious than the story of Black Wall street.

While many are claiming that some random black guy shot Ermias Davidson Asghedom, I prefer to say his real name ( otherwise known as Nipsey Hustle) I see the nefarious hands of white people in this. He was not some random thug, doing thug shit. This was a business man, who exemplified the amurdikkklan lie that anybody can pull themselves up by their boot strap. The lie is you as a Afurakan person, can do so without interference. White wealth has always been built on credit. That is, its built on white people taking credit for every thing black people do. Like building the economy of the South during our enslavement. Saving their assess in their civil war, their Revolutionary wars, WWI and WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the site of the Capital of amurdikkka and many other things that meritorious manumission would take care of. And for the record, most murders of famous people are committed in amurdikkka after they attempted to rally our people to raise our economic and land ownership status. I believe the fall out from this murder will either be that “line gun man on a grassy knoll” or some sucker “known to police” offered up as sacrifice. But how does a random black dude shooting him explained? Are they gonna say it was a drug deal gone bad? past beef? childhood revenge?, Gang activity? what will be the official police report?
Things that make you go mmmmm?

Article by BlackMyStory

Trojan Pam-Concealed Weapons are for white people

 

This is a great video featuring the late great Trojan Pam(Pamela Evans).  She explains how concealed weapons are designed to help black people.  If anything it’s designed to get more black people killed!  Check out the video and let me know your thoughts.

Price of Stolen Goods- Amos Wilson

 

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THIS IS ONE OF MY FAVORITE LECTURES BY THE GREAT AMOS WILSON.  THE VIDEO IS SHORT AND STRAIGHT TO THE POINT!  BUT EVERY WORD IS THE TRUTH.  HE BREAKS DOWN THE PRICE OF STOLEN GOODS!  MURDER,COLONIZATION,RAPE AND LYNCHINGS ARE DISGRACEFUL AND SATANIC.  THOSE DEBTS MUST BE PAID. I COULDN’T AGREE WITH HIM MORE!

 

Is the violence in Chicago the Purge films come to life?

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Have you seen the latest Purge film?  It’s being called the First Purge.  It’s the fourth film in the series.  The film is about pushing the crime rate below one percent. It’s supposed to be a test of the sociological theory that vents aggression for one night in one isolated community.  This version takes place in New York.  In a mostly black area that has black people killing each other. When there isn’t enough killing to their liking the government sends in hired gunmen to kill citizens. But…this could never happen right?

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Or has it already happened before? Sometimes I wonder if it’s art imitating life?

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Well in this radio interview(above)  Umar Johnson believes that the Purge films represent what’s going on in Chicago right now.  He says that’s why you have all these unsolved murders throughout the city.  After listening to the interview I must admit he presents a strong case.  Take a listen and let me know what you think.  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

Slavery was way back then- Amos Wilson

Amos Wilson...

“I’m often somewhat amused and taken aback by the number of people in this society who claim that slavery occurred somewhere back then…and that the experience of slavery is not supposed to be operating in the mentality of black folks. You hear a lot of youngsters saying that as well.
“Why do you talk about slavery? That was back there.”
Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve never escaped slavery. We still share the slave consciousness of our great-great-grandparents. We are of the same mind to a great extent that they were. We have not advanced beyond these people.
How can I say that? I generally ask a series of questions. You say that slavery has nothing to do with you and that slavery was back there.
I ask you what language do you speak? When did you learn that language? Was that the language African people were speaking when we were taken into slavery in America? In other words, the language we speak at this moment is a slave language.
The language that our slave ancestors were forced to learn. And we still speak it and you can still hear the pidgin, the Creole and the other kinds of stuff in our language right now. That language, with its words defined by history and by experience, is the language we use today to guide our behavior. It’s the language we use today to talk to ourselves.
It’s the language we use today to learn about ourselves and to learn about the world. It’s the language we use to try to understand ourselves. Is there no wonder then that we are still confused? So we have not escaped slavery because we are still using a slave language, and we speak the language of slaves.

Slavery..
What kind of food do you eat? You say, “soul food”? Was that the food of African  people? Slave food. The food that we find most satisfying. The food that we find that sticks to our ribs. The food that we call “down home”.
A food that we learned to eat in the quarters.
And yet we dare say that we have escaped slavery. That we have nothing to do with those people back there. When our whole very social life and social relationships, our very definition of ourselves as a people, our very attempt to commune with ourselves is mediated by the food of slaves. How can you say you exist in a different consciousness from another people?
What kind of uniforms are we wearing? What kind of clothes are we wearing? Were these the clothes of African people? This is what we’ve got to look at.
What kind of names do we respond to? What kind of names do we identify with? Why is it that African names sound strange to us now as a people? And yet we dare say we have a different consciousness from our great-grandparents. How can we say that?
We are still in the same consciousness and we are still in the same position.
Because we are still servants of the white man, and our reason for being in America is to serve white folks and to generate wealth for them. And there has been no change at all in terms of our relationship to these people. I’m often somewhat amused and taken aback by the number of people in this society who claim that slavery occurred somewhere back then…and that the experience of slavery is not supposed to be operating in the mentality of black folks. You hear a lot of youngsters saying that as well.
“Why do you talk about slavery? That was back there.”
Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve never escaped slavery. We still share the slave consciousness of our great-great-grandparents. We are of the same mind to a great extent that they were. We have not advanced beyond these people.
How can I say that? I generally ask a series of questions. You say that slavery has nothing to do with you and that slavery was back there.
I ask you what language do you speak? When did you learn that language? Was that the language African people were speaking when we were taken into slavery in America? In other words, the language we speak at this moment is a slave language.
The language that our slave ancestors were forced to learn. And we still speak it and you can still hear the pidgin, the Creole and the other kinds of stuff in our language right now. That language, with its words defined by history and by experience, is the language we use today to guide our behavior. It’s the language we use today to talk to ourselves.
It’s the language we use today to learn about ourselves and to learn about the world. It’s the language we use to try to understand ourselves. Is there no wonder then that we are still confused? So we have not escaped slavery because we are still using a slave language, and we speak the language of slaves.
What kind of food do you eat? You say, “soul food”? Was that the food of African  people? Slave food. The food that we find most satisfying. The food that we find that sticks to our ribs. The food that we call “down home”.
A food that we learned to eat in the quarters.
And yet we dare say that we have escaped slavery. That we have nothing to do with those people back there. When our whole very social life and social relationships, our very definition of ourselves as a people, our very attempt to commune with ourselves is mediated by the food of slaves. How can you say you exist in a different consciousness from another people?
What kind of uniforms are we wearing? What kind of clothes are we wearing? Were these the clothes of African people? This is what we’ve got to look at.
What kind of names do we respond to? What kind of names do we identify with? Why is it that African names sound strange to us now as a people? And yet we dare say we have a different consciousness from our great-grandparents. How can we say that?
We are still in the same consciousness and we are still in the same position.
Because we are still servants of the white man, and our reason for being in America is to serve white folks and to generate wealth for them. And there has been no change at all in terms of our relationship to these people.”