Empress AK

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Some of you may not be familiar with this Jamaican queen. But this gorgeous woman is Empress AK.  She is not only beautiful but also an intelligent,Afrocentric and outspoken black  woman. As well as being a successful businesswoman.  Here is her bio from her website:

EmpressAK is an amalgamation of righteousness, sagacity, recklessness, wit and a dash of spice; the perfect dichotomy. In fact, everyone has a bit of EmpressAK (balance) in them, some not cognizant of it, others afraid to truly express it. The aim of this site is to provide a platform where anyone can weigh in on a plethora of topics from cultural, social, personal. These topics are packaged in different forms; thought provoking to humorous. Let’s build, laugh, learn!

Weh di scene? (what’s up?) I’m Alli “Ak” Slater. I was wondering if I should enumerate all of my accomplishments, credentials, birthplace, and talk in the third person but let’s be real, this isn’t a eulogy or cover letter, I’m alive with a job (praise God). Actually, all of those things doesn’t and shouldn’t matter here. Just know I am unapologetically Afro-Caribbean, I love controversial dialogue, a good laugh, and will always say what is on my mind, and of course if you are dying to know more, ask me. I am constantly learning about myself, culture and those around me. Join thee on this journey! 

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Jodie Turner-Smith

Jodie Smith...

Jodie Turner-Smith is a model/actress from Jamaica.  Here’s an interview she did recently:

How did you get your start in modeling?

JODIE: Interestingly enough, what pushed me to start modeling was an encounter I had in Pittsburgh. I was backstage with some friends of mine who worked with N.E.R.D at one of their shows and was introduced to Pharrell. At the time I was looking to pursue a career in writing and told him as such. He told me that I needed to be in front of a camera, and proceeded to call a friend of his who was in the industry. That moment wasn’t necessarily a “be all end all moment”, what struck me about it was that here was a perfect stranger so excited and insistent upon me pursuing this idea that I knew nothing about and never thought I could before. It inspired me to believe in myself. A month later, I moved to Los Angeles, walked into NEXT Model Management and booked my first job, a Levi’s campaign.

How is acting different from modeling?

JODIE: I think that anyone who models understands that being in front of the camera requires a bit of acting. In so many ways, you’re playing a role, though it is definitely a simplified version of what you do on a stage or screen. With acting, the role you play isn’t about selling a product, and you have the chance to be much more creative. There is so much more preparation that goes into it and into creating your interpretation of the character that has been written. With modeling, you can get away with just being a silent pretty face. When you’re acting, you have to be more than that.

JSmith...

As a writer in addition to being a model, do you feel it gives you a unique perspective on fashion?

JODIE: Writing has been my outlet for as long as I can remember and it precedes my identity as a model–which basically means that before I was told I could make a living by appearing “attractive”, I was just an awkward book-worm crafting stories that came from the world inside my head. Actually, I’m still an awkward book-worm crafting stories that come from the world inside my head! I think that aspect of me gives me a perspective that is equal parts cerebral and creative. It is also gives me a unique ability to commit all of the colorful characters and experiences I’ve encountered to a very humorous story in the book I’ll write when I get older!

What was your experience on True Blood like?

JODIE: I’m still reeling from that fact that my first acting experience was on one of my favorite shows! While getting covered in fake blood from head to toe wasn’t the most comfortable costume, I had such an amazing time working on the show. Stephen Moyer is a great actor and director, and he directed the first episode that I did. He was also the only character throughout the season who could see my character, so the aspect of haunting him in a sense was a really fun role to play! I don’t know how my poor dad is gonna react to me being a naked vampire, but it hasn’t aired yet in the UK, so I’ve got time to break it to him!

Patra(Fine Sistas from the 90’s)

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Reggae singer Patra was really big in the 1990’s.  She was a big in the dancehall scene and a huge sex symbol.  Her real name is Dorothy Smith.  She was born in Kingston,Jamaica  on November 22,1972.

In a 1994 essay, Patra wrote: “I am a country girl. I grew up in the church, which instilled morals and values in me. I was raised by my mom along with my four brothers–I am the second child. My father died when I was three, so my mother has been my example of a very strong Black woman, and I know that I have her strength.”

Patra first began singing in her church choir and later tried her hand at deejaying. At age 15, she began to realize that music really could be her life. “I always enjoyed music, but up until then I didn’t really think about my goals,” Patra explains. “In addition to many Jamaican artists, I listened to Tina Turner, Patti LaBelle, Sade and Alexander O’Neal. And Michael Jackson, of course–he really taught me how to dance!”

Patra first made her mark in the U.S. with two notable guest appearances, dueting with Mad Cobra on a track called “Really Do It” and adding her wicked ragga-rap to Richie Stevens “Body Slam.” But the American audience got its first taste of Patra’s true gifts with the Epic Records Group re-lease of her underground 12-inch single “Hardcore.” In October, 1993 came the debut album Queen Of The Pack, and the single and video “Think (About It)”–which teamed Patra with Lyn Collins and the P-Funk Horns for a dynamic dancehall update of Lyns 1972 Top Ten R&B smash.

Each of Patras next three videos–“Queen Of The Pack,” “Worker Man,” and “Romantic Call” (featuring Yo-Yo)– became a Top 10 favorite on The Box. At the 5th Annual Caribbean Music Awards (held March, `94 at the Apollo Theater in New York), Patra was named Best Female Artist for “Worker Man.” At the 13th Annual International Reggae Awards in Chicago, she walked away with Best Female DJ and Best Crossover Song (for “Family Affair,” from the Addams Family soundtrack). In Canadas Reggae Music Awards, Patra was again named Best Female DJ.

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By July, 1994 Patras Queen Of The Pack had spent 13 consecutive weeks at #1 on Billboards Top Reggae Albums chart–the longest run at #1 in the history of the chart. The following December, the album was certified gold for sales of more than 500,000 copies. In addition to her own album, Patra embarked on successful collaborations with C&C Music Factory (“Take A Toke”) and Gurus Jazzmatazz II set (“Young Ladies”), as well as joining in the all-female superstar recording “Freedom” for the soundtrack of Melvin Van Peebles film Panther.

“Jamaican dancehall music has its first international queen of the genre,” wrote Vanity Fair, “and her name is Patra!” In 1995, she rules once more with Scent Of Attraction.

Tales of Buffoonery: Episode 18(Barack Obama)

Obama..

President Obama really deserves this honor.  Did you know he would not pardon great African hero Marcus Garvey? Well, Florida-based Jamaican-born attorney Donovan Parker has been writing to president Obama every week since January 2014 requesting a posthumous pardon for Garvey, who many believe was set up by the J Edgar Hoover-led Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI), fearful of his widening popularity among downtrodden US blacks.

The sad thing was Marcus Garvey has really been kept out of the school history book for really nothing at all. Garvey was imprisoned for mail fraud totaling US$25 in June 1923, and after spending two years and nine months in an Atlanta Federal Penitentiary, was deported from New Orleans, Louisiana to Jamaica on a ship.

President Obama reduced the sentences Thursday of eight prisoners serving long federal prison sentences — six of them life sentences — under draconian laws for crack-cocaine sentencing. He also pardoned 13 others, at least six of whom were in prison for drug offenses.

In a statement, Obama noted that the eight individuals whose sentences he commuted were serving racially discriminatory sentences for crack cocaine, under a pre-2010 sentencing disparity that issued sentences 100 times harsher for crack cocaine, associated with African Americans, than for powder cocaine, associated with whites.
Ok so why not Marcus Garvey? Obama has even pardon Miles Thomas Wilson – Williamsburg, Ohio. His offense: Mail fraud (Southern District of Ohio) he was sentence three years’ probation (Jul. 15, 1981). Even he got a pardon for the same offense.

Marcus Mosiah Garvey is also a National Hero of Jamaica, West Indies and a leading forebear of the African American civil rights experience,” wrote Parker.

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“It is full time that this extraordinary human being of humble beginnings and strong moral character be pardoned by the pen of an American president. It would be fitting if both you, Mr President, and the first lady visit Jamaica for the purposes of signing the executive order pardoning Marcus Mosiah Garvey.”

In a tersely worded reply to Parker’s request, White House Pardon Attorney, Ronald Rodgers said such a move would be a waste of time and resources since Garvey had been dead for ages.

“It is the general policy of the Department of Justice that requests for posthumous pardons for federal offences not be processed for adjudication. The policy is grounded in the belief that the time of the officials involved in the clemency process is better spent on pardon and commutation requests of living persons.

“Many posthumous pardon requests would likely be based on a claim of manifest injustice, and given that decades have passed since the event and the historical record would have to be scoured to objectively and comprehensively investigate such applications, it is the Department’s position that the limited resources which are available to process requests for Presidential clemency — now being submitted in record numbers — are best dedicated to requests submitted by persons who can truly benefit from a grant of the request,” Rodgers replied on behalf of Obama, who is the first black president in the history of the United States.

Parker expressed his utter disappointment at the latest development and called on US ambassador to Jamaica Pamela Bridgewater, to add her voice to the call for Garvey to be officially pardoned. This is truly shameful in my opinion.  Obama should be ashamed of himself! Garvey is one of our greatest ancestors. But this shows he’s just a slick talking mulatto.  He has never cared about black people.  He cares more about the rights of homosexuals/lesbians than the plight of black people worldwide.  This should be a wake up call to all African people.  Obama is truly a buffoon!  He is just like the all the Presidents before him. He spits in the face of black people!

Marcus..

 

 

Hempress Sativa- Kushite Love

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I listen to a couple of different reggae artists. When I was searching for some music on Youtube I stumbled upon this beautiful  sista. This is a beautiful live performance. Her name is Hempress Sativa. I had never heard of her before. The title of the song immediately caught my attention for obvious reasons.lol  I knew I had to feature her on my blog.  I think this may become the new anthem for Kushite Kingdom!

A little  background on this talented woman.

Kerida Johnson known as Hempress Sativa was born to Rastafarian parents Doris-Ray Johnson and legendary Jamaican Selector /Musician Albert ‘Ilawi Malawi’ Johnson of the Jah Love Sound System. It was her exposure to music at home that sharpened her skills and has manifested today in her expressive writing and delivery.Hempress Sativa, who has been performing since the age of 13, with lyrics spiritedly influenced by her Rastafarian culture, as conveyed in her song “Judgement” in which she begins by chanting “No More Illusion, Rastafari is real …. Her music although generally rooted in traditional reggae rhythms, also at times, crosses genres and may reflect traces of Rhythm and Blues, African and even Hip-Hop influences as evident in the Anthem “Jah Have Mi Back”. Singles such as “Get High” and “Children of the Emperor” have been creating a buzz both locally and internationally, exemplifying her musical agility as a melodic singer and a lyrically skilled DJ. Sativa lists her musical favourites as Sade, Sister Carol and Ijahman Levi, to name few.She has worked with artists such as Micah Shemaiah, Sugarcane and the East village pharmacy, Bread (from Chalice) and producer Jahnoi Nunes. Dubbed “Hempress Sativa: Your Highness”, she intends on premiering her Ep in 2013, then the Album to be titled “UnconqueRebel Lioness” which is already near completion for its debut in the later part of said year.An artiste to definitely watch, after an electrifying performance at the recently held Revel Salute 2013 earlier this year-listen out for her latest single “Marching Outta Babylon” produced by J.O.E/ Flow factory and her feature in Backayard Magazine for the upcoming issue of 2013.Hempress Sativa is an extraordinary young talent, propelling Jamaican music into the future while strongly remaining rooted in a traditional foundation that makes her music timeless.