Deneseia LaShea

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This flawless natural beauty is  Deneseia LaShea.  This gorgeous Jamaican woman calls herself the “natural hair queen”.  It’s a very fitting title.  She’s a professional model and a photographer.

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Organ Harvesting: It’s a Global problem!

Since the abduction of black girls recently  in Washington DC,people have asked me what happened to them.  A subject that keeps coming up is organ harvesting. I think this is serious problem for black people.  I think there are very powerful people kidnapping black children and adults for their organs. This is a very scary issue that some people don’t want to touch on.  Even in the horror film Get Out is shows black people being abducted and being used for their organs.  Not too many realize that Hollywood was showing what they already do.  Are black people paying attention? I hope so. Art imitates life right? And many people aren’t aware that this is a global problem.  It is really big on the black market.  It’s not only big in America but also India,China and Jamaica.  The video(above) is a Jamaican doctor.  He explains how much of a problem it is in Jamaica. Here’s an article from the Kulture Kritic about organ harvesting:

In a 2006 article, USA today estimated that more than 16,800 families had been represented in lawsuits that claimed that their loved ones’ body parts had been stolen for profit over the course of the previous 19 years. The estimate was based on data from federal and local investigators, lawsuits and public organizations such as medical universities.

David Matas

The lucrative business of illegally harvesting and selling organs and body parts without consent does not appear to have slowed down since then. The World Health Organization estimates that as many as 7,000 kidneys are illegally obtained by traffickers every year. Other organs such as hearts, lungs and livers and human tissue such as bones, tendons and other body parts are illegally harvested all over the world for transplant, research and education.

The illegal harvesting of organs and tissue from Black men, woman, and children who are kidnapped and murdered is not covered widely in the mainstream media and is many times written off has more of a conspiracy theory than fact. However, there are several cases that prove that illegal organ harvesting from Black people is happening, not just in other countries, but right here in the United States.

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In 2008, former dentist Michael Mastromarino was indicted for stealing more than 1,000 bodies in order to sell body parts and tissue. Michael Brown of Murrieta, California kept bodies that he was supposed to have cremated and sold them for more than $400,000. These men and others who participate in the illegal harvesting and trade of body tissue leave many families without answers about what happened to their family members organs and/or body parts.

 

The illegal harvesting of organs from Black people seems to be more sinister due to the fact that organs must be harvested not long after death for them to be viable for transplant. This leads to cases where families have trouble finding answers about the mysterious circumstances their family members died under.

One such case is that of 14-year-old Jason Smith in Eros, Louisiana whose death was ruled an accidental drowning despite the fact that his organs were missing when his body was found. A case that received more attention but did not provide the family with any more answers is that of 17-year-old Kendrick Johnson whose death was initially ruled to have been the result of accidental suffocation. A second autopsy yielded a different conclusion, but when the second autopsy was performed, his body had been stuffed with newspaper, and his organs were missing.

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More recently in September 2014, 24-year-old Ryan Singleton’s body was found in a California desert with his eyes, heart, lung, liver and kidneys missing. Singleton’s mother believes that his organs were stolen because the rest of his body remained in tact, meaning the organs had not been eaten by animals.

As the disparity between supply and demand for organs  continues to be insurmountable, authorities are considering rewriting the 1984 law that bans the sale of organs, but in the meantime, the World Health Organization estimates that a human organ is illegally sold every hour, and families all over the world are left without answers about their loved ones death’s and burials.

Missing women....

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Here’s some information taken from Selfuni’s WordPress blog:

64,000 African-Americans girls are reported missing, but nobody’s looking for them.  Why?

Despite representing 12.85% of the population, black Americans accounted for nearly 226,000 — or 34% — of all missing persons reported in 2012. According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center, the comparison with other racial groups is unfavorable: Whites and Hispanics are a combined 80.1% of the population, but account for 60% of missing persons.

This is especially troubling when you break down the numbers by age. Black and Missing reports that 37% of missing minors and 28.2% of missing adults in 2013 were black. No fewer than 270,000 minorities have gone missing since 2010, 135,000 of whom were black and 64,000 were black women, according to the Atlanta Black Star.

Essence points to a 2010 report titled “Missing Children in National News Coverage,” which found that while black children accounted for 33.2% of missing children that year, the media exposure rate was an unimpressive 19.5%. While black men go missing at statistically higher rates, coverage of black female disappearances is particularly telling in light of the attention similar stories get when white women are involved.

“In the field, I’ve seen a majority of black missing children classified as runaways, who don’t get Amber Alerts.”

From Identies.Mic

Medical History

No way the same US government and media that gave so much attention to 2-300 Nigerian girls would ignore 64,000(!) its own, unless there was a reason.  The most likely reason is organ harvesting, and the  skin is the body’s biggest organ.  Considering America’s dark history of medical exploitation of Blacks, this isn’t as far-fetched as it seems at first.

First of all, there’s a long history of medical research using unwitting/unwilling African-American women for medical experiments:

on the 19th century medical plantation—a locality spatially separate from the agricultural plantation—black women’s bodies were imagined as the ideal test subjects of research and innovation within what became modern gynecology.

http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/3248/3184

That trend has continued from Emancipation until today, at the GOVERNMENT level: ”

throughout their long history in the USA, African-Americans have been secretly used as guinea pigs for medical experimentation by various American governments

http://newafricanmagazine.com/medical-scandal/#sthash.YEwwEi19.dpuf

It’s a MARKET. The medical industry cannot advance without unwitting/unwilling Black subjects. Cells secretly harvested, and later cultivated from a Black woman are the source of ALL cells used for medical research- vaccines, cloning, testing, etc. “This represented an enormous boon to medical and biological research” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henrietta_Lacks

Empress AK

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Some of you may not be familiar with this Jamaican queen. But this gorgeous woman is Empress AK.  She is not only beautiful but also an intelligent,Afrocentric and outspoken black  woman. As well as being a successful businesswoman.  Here is her bio from her website:

EmpressAK is an amalgamation of righteousness, sagacity, recklessness, wit and a dash of spice; the perfect dichotomy. In fact, everyone has a bit of EmpressAK (balance) in them, some not cognizant of it, others afraid to truly express it. The aim of this site is to provide a platform where anyone can weigh in on a plethora of topics from cultural, social, personal. These topics are packaged in different forms; thought provoking to humorous. Let’s build, laugh, learn!

Weh di scene? (what’s up?) I’m Alli “Ak” Slater. I was wondering if I should enumerate all of my accomplishments, credentials, birthplace, and talk in the third person but let’s be real, this isn’t a eulogy or cover letter, I’m alive with a job (praise God). Actually, all of those things doesn’t and shouldn’t matter here. Just know I am unapologetically Afro-Caribbean, I love controversial dialogue, a good laugh, and will always say what is on my mind, and of course if you are dying to know more, ask me. I am constantly learning about myself, culture and those around me. Join thee on this journey! 

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Jodie Turner-Smith

Jodie Smith...

Jodie Turner-Smith is a model/actress from Jamaica.  Here’s an interview she did recently:

How did you get your start in modeling?

JODIE: Interestingly enough, what pushed me to start modeling was an encounter I had in Pittsburgh. I was backstage with some friends of mine who worked with N.E.R.D at one of their shows and was introduced to Pharrell. At the time I was looking to pursue a career in writing and told him as such. He told me that I needed to be in front of a camera, and proceeded to call a friend of his who was in the industry. That moment wasn’t necessarily a “be all end all moment”, what struck me about it was that here was a perfect stranger so excited and insistent upon me pursuing this idea that I knew nothing about and never thought I could before. It inspired me to believe in myself. A month later, I moved to Los Angeles, walked into NEXT Model Management and booked my first job, a Levi’s campaign.

How is acting different from modeling?

JODIE: I think that anyone who models understands that being in front of the camera requires a bit of acting. In so many ways, you’re playing a role, though it is definitely a simplified version of what you do on a stage or screen. With acting, the role you play isn’t about selling a product, and you have the chance to be much more creative. There is so much more preparation that goes into it and into creating your interpretation of the character that has been written. With modeling, you can get away with just being a silent pretty face. When you’re acting, you have to be more than that.

JSmith...

As a writer in addition to being a model, do you feel it gives you a unique perspective on fashion?

JODIE: Writing has been my outlet for as long as I can remember and it precedes my identity as a model–which basically means that before I was told I could make a living by appearing “attractive”, I was just an awkward book-worm crafting stories that came from the world inside my head. Actually, I’m still an awkward book-worm crafting stories that come from the world inside my head! I think that aspect of me gives me a perspective that is equal parts cerebral and creative. It is also gives me a unique ability to commit all of the colorful characters and experiences I’ve encountered to a very humorous story in the book I’ll write when I get older!

What was your experience on True Blood like?

JODIE: I’m still reeling from that fact that my first acting experience was on one of my favorite shows! While getting covered in fake blood from head to toe wasn’t the most comfortable costume, I had such an amazing time working on the show. Stephen Moyer is a great actor and director, and he directed the first episode that I did. He was also the only character throughout the season who could see my character, so the aspect of haunting him in a sense was a really fun role to play! I don’t know how my poor dad is gonna react to me being a naked vampire, but it hasn’t aired yet in the UK, so I’ve got time to break it to him!

Patra(Fine Sistas from the 90’s)

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Reggae singer Patra was really big in the 1990’s.  She was a big in the dancehall scene and a huge sex symbol.  Her real name is Dorothy Smith.  She was born in Kingston,Jamaica  on November 22,1972.

In a 1994 essay, Patra wrote: “I am a country girl. I grew up in the church, which instilled morals and values in me. I was raised by my mom along with my four brothers–I am the second child. My father died when I was three, so my mother has been my example of a very strong Black woman, and I know that I have her strength.”

Patra first began singing in her church choir and later tried her hand at deejaying. At age 15, she began to realize that music really could be her life. “I always enjoyed music, but up until then I didn’t really think about my goals,” Patra explains. “In addition to many Jamaican artists, I listened to Tina Turner, Patti LaBelle, Sade and Alexander O’Neal. And Michael Jackson, of course–he really taught me how to dance!”

Patra first made her mark in the U.S. with two notable guest appearances, dueting with Mad Cobra on a track called “Really Do It” and adding her wicked ragga-rap to Richie Stevens “Body Slam.” But the American audience got its first taste of Patra’s true gifts with the Epic Records Group re-lease of her underground 12-inch single “Hardcore.” In October, 1993 came the debut album Queen Of The Pack, and the single and video “Think (About It)”–which teamed Patra with Lyn Collins and the P-Funk Horns for a dynamic dancehall update of Lyns 1972 Top Ten R&B smash.

Each of Patras next three videos–“Queen Of The Pack,” “Worker Man,” and “Romantic Call” (featuring Yo-Yo)– became a Top 10 favorite on The Box. At the 5th Annual Caribbean Music Awards (held March, `94 at the Apollo Theater in New York), Patra was named Best Female Artist for “Worker Man.” At the 13th Annual International Reggae Awards in Chicago, she walked away with Best Female DJ and Best Crossover Song (for “Family Affair,” from the Addams Family soundtrack). In Canadas Reggae Music Awards, Patra was again named Best Female DJ.

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By July, 1994 Patras Queen Of The Pack had spent 13 consecutive weeks at #1 on Billboards Top Reggae Albums chart–the longest run at #1 in the history of the chart. The following December, the album was certified gold for sales of more than 500,000 copies. In addition to her own album, Patra embarked on successful collaborations with C&C Music Factory (“Take A Toke”) and Gurus Jazzmatazz II set (“Young Ladies”), as well as joining in the all-female superstar recording “Freedom” for the soundtrack of Melvin Van Peebles film Panther.

“Jamaican dancehall music has its first international queen of the genre,” wrote Vanity Fair, “and her name is Patra!” In 1995, she rules once more with Scent Of Attraction.