Martin Luther King Jr.(Forgotten Quotes)

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They say you can tell what a nation stands for by looking at who they see as heroes.  I always think about that when Martin Luther King’s birthday comes around.  Does America truly cherish his ideals?  I don’t really think so. Martin Luther King was a very complex individual.  They say he stood up against injustice and racism…but he had numerous sexual affairs as well.  Can a man be socially moral and still cheat on his wife?  I guess it’s somewhat possible.  But after doing years of research on MLK I found out that he had an idealistic worldview but he wasn’t perfect.  But we all know there are many famous men who cheated on their wives(John F Kennedy,Bill Clinton,Donald Trump).  But this post isn’t about that.  In this post I wanted to put up some quotes that often get overlooked.  King’s views changed from when he made the “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963.  As the Vietnam War waged on and all the racial strife continued…his idealistic views started to diminish over time.  He started to view the racist European society a little bit more realistically. I think Malcolm X understood the European mentality a little better.  But King was getting there before he was killed in 1968. Here’s a nice list of forgotten quotes.  Shout out to Abagond  for pulling up some of thee quotes.

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“The white man does not abide by the law… His police forces are the ultimate mockery of law.”
“There aren’t enough white persons in our country who are willing to cherish democratic principles over privilege.”
“Three hundred years of humiliation, abuse and deprivation cannot be expected to find voice in a whisper.”
“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar.”
“We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality.”
“We must see now that the evils of racism, economic exploitation and militarism are all tied together.”

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society.”
“A riot is the language of the unheard,”
“A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring contrast of poverty and wealth.”
“All of us are on trial in this troubled hour.”
“America is going to hell if we don’t use her vast resources to end poverty and make it possible for all God’s children to have the basic necessities of life.”

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“I am sorry to have to say that the vast majority of white Americans are racists, either consciously or unconsciously.”
“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly.”
“It is cruel jest to tell a bootless man that he ought to lift himself up by his own bootstraps”
“No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.”
“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.”

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Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”
“Poverty is one of the most urgent items on the agenda of modern life.”
“The curse of poverty has no justification in our age. It is socially as cruel and blind as the practice of cannibalism.”
“The evils of capitalism are as real as the evils of militarism and evils of racism.”

Message about the Women’s March-Shemeka Michelle

 

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The Hidden Message of Hidden Figures

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It seems most fitting to begin this piece by stating that mathematician Katherine Johnson is a genius. Thus, a movie celebrating black brilliance sounds progressive, however the actual portrayal renders Johnson a “hidden figure” in a supposed commemoration of her legacy.

The film briefly shows audiences a young Katherine, whose academic ability foments opportunity despite the obvious oppression of the early 20th century. The film attempts to inspire audiences though depicting Johnson’s contribution to launching the first American body into space. However, in actuality Hidden Figures illustrates that black brilliance yields white advancement.

Audiences watch Johnson put in long hours, travel forty minutes to use the bathroom and endure a segregated coffee machine. Subversively, the film suggests that the only place for  a black intellect is in a white world. This conflict is not exclusive to this film, but extended to all encompassed by the phrase “the first black (fill in the blank)” While this phrasing appears complimentary, it shifts the focus away from the individual of African descent to the white vessel who “accepts” them.

In Hidden Figures, this white vessel is Al Harrison, played by Kevin Costner. Perhaps one of the most noteworthy scenes is Costner breaking down the segregated restroom signs. The scene received zealous plaudits from a stadium sized theatre. This applause undoubtedly erupted due to the mostly white audience’s attempt to overtly align themselves with Harrison’s seemingly integrative initiative. For me, this scene provoked an adverse reaction.

Watching this scene brought me back to a Dr. Carr lecture I attended almost a decade ago. During this lecture, Dr. Carr said that “nothing has been done for blacks that did not benefit others.” Namely, these segregated signs existed at NASA although there were no no black individuals worked in this particular wing. Thus, the signs served no direct purpose but to remind those who cleaned the facilities that they were good enough to scrub toilets but not sit on them. Thus, Harrison’s acts are not commendable—they’re selfish. This very deed exposes the fault in integration. The segregated bathroom only becomes an issue when it deterred white initiative. Namely, only when segregation proved an obstacle to his advancement and reputation was it taken down. It is this selfishness, not ideas of equality or unity, that continues to fuel black inclusion in traditionally white spaces.

Before concluding this article, I would like to state that my criticism is not to take away from Mrs. Katherine Johnson’s legacy. This article does function to state that this film is not an accurate depiction of this legacy. I would love to have learned more about her life pre-Nasa, the parents who raised her, her experience at school, how she balanced motherhood and work, and the strength it took to raise three young kids as a young widow. Hidden Figures abbreviates Mrs. Johnson’s life, making her a largely enigmatic figure in a film that is seemingly about her. Johnson’s hidden figure status in her own film suggests that all black excellence yields hidden figure status in a white supremacist society. In veiling sentiments of deprived visibility, the film highlights how imperative it is that we as black tell “our story” and not his-story. For the moral of the story is not Johnson’s greatness, but what history continually tells in in films like 42, The Blind Side and The Help, which is simply that blacks can do anything if whites think they are special.

Article by C.C. Saunders

Jesse Williams: Deconstructing the Message

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It seems as though the Jesse Williams speech at the BET Awards has caused quite a bit of controversy.  I have seen a lot of arguing between black people on social media.  Some black people say the speech was on point.  Some say he’s biracial and can’t be trusted.  Some black women are swooning over his light skin and light colored eyes. Some believe he’s an agent for the white power structure.  And some believe he was given the platform to confuse black people even more.  I wanted to put up some videos that may give a different perspective on this man,his speech and his intentions.

This is a great video by Holipsism.  Holipsism wants to know what is the end result of the speech.  Does Jesse want Black Power? Is Jesse just pushing social integration?  Holipsism raises some very important questions many have not brought up.

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This video(above) is  by Radical HomeGoddess.  She explains why she doesn’t trust Williams.  She explores the evidence of him being down with the homosexual agenda. He even compares the black struggle with the so-called gay struggle for rights.  Which we know there is NO comparison.  He is also working on a documentary about the Black Lives Matter movement.  Of course anyone who has done some research knows the organization is funded by white racist George Soros. So check out the videos and draw your own conclusions.  Is Jesse down for black liberation?  Or does he just know how to give a good speech?

Assimilation Fantasies- Amos Wilson

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Cultural assimilation is the process by which a person or a group’s language and/or culture come to resemble those of another group. The term is used to refer to both individuals and groups, and in the latter case it can refer to either immigrant diasporas or native residents that come to be culturally dominated by another society. Assimilation may involve either a quick or gradual change depending on circumstances of the group. Full assimilation occurs when new members of a society become indistinguishable from members of the other group. Whether or not it is desirable for an immigrant group to assimilate is often disputed by both members of the group and those of the dominant society.

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Have Black people really made any progress?


In this video Claud Anderson asks the question if black people have made any real progress in America. It would seem that since we have many black millionaire singers,rappers and athletes–that we have. But if you look beneath the surface you will see that not much has changed in over 100 years. It is only the illusion of progress.