Watson Mere(Black Business series)

Watson Mere..

When did you get your start with Art?

I have been creating art since I was 2 and never really stopped. Through the years my style has changed multiple times but after my parents purchased a desktop computer when I was in middle school I began to experiment with creating art utilizing Microsoft Paint with a mouse and I’ve been using this technique of creation ever since.

Mere1..

How would you describe your artistic style?

Since I am of Haitian descent my art is naturally colorful. Big hair and African features are seen in mostly all of my pieces. I also try to purposefully instill some form of content to get the viewers imagination going as to what the image means or says to them.

Where do you draw inspiration for your work?

The African diaspora. I take my inspiration from the love, struggles, happiness and pain of people of African descent. Most of my painting are of Black Women and I try my best to display her in her complete beauty, strength, resilience, passion, pride, and sometimes even vulnerable states. I’m also inspired to create an image of people of color that is usually not depicted within mainstream media.

Mere2...

Mere4...

 

What was the first art piece you sold?

The first art piece that I ever sold was to a local musician. The piece was of him playing his trumpet and although I didn’t sell it for much it felt gratifying to know that something that I created from a mere thought in my head was worthy of someone spending their hard earned cash on.

What has been your most notable collections?

One of my most notable pieces would be “Something Beautiful”. The piece depicts the side profile of a black woman the locs smelling lilies. Hanging from the woman’s hair is a Klan’s man. The piece has many meaning but one is that truly being at peace and loving your natural self over powers any form of hate. “care Free” is another notable piece. It shows a black couple walking undismayed through a crowd holding signs. The crowd and the signs are somewhat of a time lapse displaying the oppressive words against people of color including modern versions of these signs shown in the front. This piece holds many meaning as well but one of the main is “Same signs different time.” Even the cruelest of these signs were seen as just and normal during their time of existence.

Mere5..

Mere7...

https://artofmere.com/

Who is an African/Black person?- Black Genetics(Part 1 of 4)

Who is black?  What is an African?  This is a question I have been thinking about the last few years.  Mainly because I have seen many debates on YouTube,Twitter and Facebook on who is a black person.  It’s  a hot topic that just wont seem to go away.  I think the fact that people are debating it must mean many of us are still very confused.  Why is that?  Why is the black collective so confused about our own identity?  The video(above) is really good.  I know for some it might seem offensive.  But you can tell that the speaker has really analyzed this issue.  It’s a very touchy subject that most black people want to run away from.

Black People1...

This picture(above) shows different African women around the world. And of course there are people of African descent in America,Canada and the United Kingdom.  Some people say many of us are mixed raced people.  Some say we come in different shades because of years of race mixing.  I will address race mixing in part two of this series.  I personally don’t think race mixing is good for the black collective.  It seems to cause more confusion more than anything else. But I guess the real question is how is a black person defined? What do Africans look like?  How are Africans classified?

African features...

Black family...

Fellow blogger C.C. Saunders stated this about blackness:

“Blackness is not limited to a skin color, but it is a state of being, an incomparable experience prompted by skin color, facial features, body type and hair texture. Omitting any identifying attribute allots a significant privilege absent from the lifetime of any black person possessing these attributes in entirety. However, melanin, while a chief component of blackness, does not encompass the totality of blackness. To distinguish between black and melanated is essential to understanding blackness as a collective identity.”

Blogger Amos Magazine said this about African people:

“Prior to the enslavement of West and Central Africans, Africans had certain traits and certain biological markers that made them a separate distinct group. Africans prior to 1500 and prior to the infamous fictitious Willie Lynch Letter had traitsAfricans prior to the invasion of Arabs, Berbers and other West Asian people had skin color from brown to dark brown. This is an African trait. Africans had one common hair texture. Yes, Europeans upon arriving  in what today is called Rwanda did notice that many Africans were a lighter shade of Brown from other Africans. But they were not yellow or near white. They were simply a pecan brown color as compared to the dark chocolate color of the other group. They used these slight differences in order to pit one group against on another. Today, DNA* test (* because there are holes in this science) show that the Hutu and Tutsi were actually the same people and that Hutu and Tutsi were actually social status. Now Negros will use to in order to say mulattoes are Africans. ***(3star concepts mean this is something to pay special attention to) ***The Tutsi who were divided into people of a lighter hue of brown were not products of mixed raced sexual relationships. My opponents will purposely leave this out in order to compare a mulatto vs. an authentic African or an authentic disasporic Africans.”

Blogger Bhekizitha breaks it down from a biological standpoint:

“An African / Black person is clearly visually a “close” descendant of people from East Africa, a region comprised of countries now known as Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Their color variation ranges from bronze, dark reddish-brown, dark or nut brown, dark-chocolate color plus “peppercorn” hair.”

This video(above) is very interesting.  I first saw this video about four years ago.  It’s the author Supreme Understanding. He has authored books such as How to Hustle and Win,Knowledge of Self and Black God.  I’ve read a few of his books.  I must admit that he knows quite a bit about black history and African culture.  But he’s not African…he’s an Indian man.  Years ago I remember seeing him in a picture with his black wife.  In this video he says that being black is color,culture and consciousness. So he’s saying it’s not just physical traits that make you black.  So if a Mexican,Indian or Asian man listens to rap music,studies African culture and has a black wife…..that makes him black? So it’s just about having a black consciousness? This can create a problem in the long run.

What is Black....

This picture(above) is from Supreme Understanding’s website.  It’s titled What is Black? Looking at the pictures you can see all these dark skinned people from India,China,Pacific Islands,Malaysia and Australia. But are these people really Africans? Or do they have racial admixture? Were the original inhabitants of Australia or India really Africans? And if so,what does it mean for black people today?  I think black people really like to be all inclusive.  We like hearing that our ancestors were all over the world and created civilizations.  That’s very true to a large extent.  And to many of us we have a dream of creating some type of racial utopia.  A world in which all people who have some melanin are brothers and sisters.  But this is not reality.  There will always be racial and cultural divisions.   Just because you have dark skinned people in India and Malaysia doesn’t mean they can relate to a black person in America.  The culture of a dark skinned Aborigine in Australia is totally different than a black person living in Jamaica.  I always promote black unity,black love and black power on this blog.  But you can’t have any type of unity if you can’t even decide who is black and who is not black.  How can you have any type of cohesiveness when there are no clear cut definitions on your identity? And this is why the video by Supreme is problematic.  He believes that all “people of color” are fighting against a white power structure. Therefore we are all in this fight together.  But my thinking is that why can’t we fight a racist society and still maintain our own unique racial identity. Why does everyone with a little bit of color have to be considered black?  By making everyone black…no one is really black.  Our unique blackness gets lost in the process.  Chinese people don’t have this problem.  They don’t accept just anyone who might have their physical traits.  I’ve seen Hispanics with a yellowish skin tone but they are not seen as Chinese.  I’ve seen people that were biracial(Black/Chinese) with slanted eyes.  But just because they had slanted eyes,Chinese people still don’t see them as one of them. By doing this it helps them stay homogeneous.  They are able to maintain their racial identity.  And this is something black/African people must keep in mind when want to distinguish ourselves from other groups.  By letting anyone claim “blackness” it devalues those that are black in the process.

Dajah Vamour

Dajah Vamour...

This stunning beauty is Dajah Vamour.  This gorgeous woman is of Haitian descent. I could stare at her pictures all day! Enjoy!

Dajah....

Dajah...

Haitians expose criminal Hillary Clinton

Clinton2..

The Democratic National Convention is being held in Philadelphia this week.  And there are Haitian immigrants outside the convention accusing Clinton of defrauding Haiti of billions in earthquake relief money and destabilizing the nations economy and state institutions.

Mainstream media has moreover tried to ignore this most significant part of the Clintons’ background. It is where Bill and Hillary Clinton spent their honeymoon. But since then, the poor island nation has become a source of undue enrichment for friends and family of the Clintons and they themselves.

When the 2010 earthquake hit Haiti, former U.S. President Bill Clinton and then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton exacerbated the devastation to their own benefit. In the end, billions of dollars donated by individuals from countries all around the world, weeks upon weeks of top story attention on any and every news agency around the world, left Haitians not just where they began, but in worse circumstances.

Bill Clinton was head of the United Nations Envoy to Haiti and managed himself to head the Interim Haiti Reconstruction Commission (IHRC). It was a commission of Haitian and international actors who would coordinate more than $13 billion [US] in earthquake relief and reconstruction money. It wouldn’t take long before members of the commission began complaining about being shut out of discussions and planning.

By all accounts, the money and what it was meant to do never really reached the Haitian people. While the Clinton Foundation only puts 10% of its donations towards charity, the IHRC was a real racket for Clinton pals, 1% went towards Haitian groups and agencies on the ground. All that is transparent is that the money didn’t go to Haiti, beyond that the trail goes cold.

The money for earthquake relief was funneled massively to friends of the Clintons, who so happen to be donors to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation and Hillary’s 2016 presidential campaign.

It was a major kickback scheme. Even the projects that were expected of the Clinton cronies didn’t match up to their billing and barely endured a year. The State Department Inspector General would release a scathing report of waste, poor oversight, to a degree all but criminal.

Hillary1..

Hillary Clinton, as the U.S. Secretary of State, sent her Chief of Staff, Cheryl Mills, to Haiti in January 2011 and according to live, on-air radio, testimony by the Director General of Haiti’s Provisional Electoral Council at the time, Mills changed the election results to favor a raunchy musician who had finished in fourth place.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) paid a group, that a month prior on December 7, 2010, staged riots in the cities of Port-au-Prince and Les Cayes. It was exactly this disorder, by a group that would be funded by USAID to the tune of $100,000 [US], that the Clinton State Department would use as basis for its intervention in the elections and changing of the results of the will of the Haitian people.

Furthermore, for 5 years, the musician-turned-president attempted to install a totalitarian regime in Haiti by not organizing elections. One by one Haiti’s institutions fell as elections were not held. All local townships fell in December of 2011. A third of the Senate in May of 2012. And ultimately, a second third of the Senate and the entire Chamber of Deputies on the fifth anniversary of the earthquake, January 12, 2015.

In the absence of checks and balance, Hillary Clinton’s younger brother obtained one of two of the first gold mining contracts awarded by Haiti in more than 50 years. The other went to members of the totalitarian regime.

Haiti went from a democracy of 5,000 elected officials in 2010 to a totalitarian regime in 2015. By the time Americans go to the polls to vote for either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton for president this November, Haiti still will not have not one legitimately elected official in office. From the lowliest township up to the presidency, a representative government in Haiti is absent.

Sharon Pierre-Louis

Sharon

Sharon Pierre-Louis is a multilingual Haitian-American fluent in Creole, American Sign Language, and conversational French. She is a classical/Opera singer and has 5 siblings, including a Deaf older brother. Her parents came to the United States during the 1980s in search of a better future. Years later, she was their first child to be born in America. Born and raised in Florida, Pierre-Louis ended up meeting her three older siblings, who were all born in Haiti, for the first time by the age of 6. She discovered her love of acting after performing a Langston Hughes poem in the 6th grade. That following year she was accepted into a performing arts middle/high school (Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts)that changed her life forever. Pierre-Louis went on to performing in churches, community theaters, schools, and various programs to positively impact inner city youth. She is also an avid reader, and actively involved within the Deaf community.

Natasha Ellie

Natasha1

Natasha2

They call me the “Haitian Sensation”

My name is Natasha Elie, and of course my Ethnicity is Haitian.
I now reside in Los Angeles, but also travel a lot. I started working in this industry since 2001, and have been featured in several music videos, Ad Campaigns, Commercials, Calendars..etc…