The Pro-Black Book Compendium

Onitaset Book...

The Pro-Black Compendium” is an activity guide for Africans who seek to develop their consciousness and the consciousness of their Brothers and Sisters. Within these pages are over 300 curated proverbs, quotations and poems from all over Africa and its diaspora, short biographies on many African authors, warriors and sages, and instructive descriptions of African wars, civilizations, books, films and pro-black business ideas.

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The compendium also has rewritten and exclusive content from its editor including the insightful “The Four Stages of African Consciousness,” a preview of the groundbreaking “Zuberi; and the Maroons of Maa,” a Pan-African Nationalist Curriculum template and Marcus Garvey’s secret epic poem “Tragedy of White Injustice.”

A must-have for Africans seeking self-knowledge and self-empowerment.

Onitaset Kumat is a very positive brother.  He has some great posts and a wealth of knowledge.  He put  a lot of time and effort into this book.  And he’s been a subscriber of my blog for over four years. So be sure to support him and purchase his book.  Ase’

https://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2017/09/02/the-pro-black-compendium-new-book/#comment-16491

Resurrection of Black Manhood: Becoming Warriors(Part 4 of 4)

This is a powerful lecture by the late great Amos Wilson.  He explains how black men need to become warriors as well as healers and builders. He breaks it down as only he can.  We need more warrior scholars like him. The time as come for black men to stand up and reclaim their neighborhoods. We need to be there to raise our children and protect black women. We need to be there to guide our sons and be a positive influence on our nephews and male cousins.  We need to also be there to protect our daughters. Also to love the mother of our daughters and show them how a real man is supposed to treat a woman.

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An Afrikan warrior scholar refuses to be at peace with anything less than the total liberation of his people. In fact, he should daily affirm that “I am an Afrikan warrior, a warrior scholar. I refuse to be at peace with anything less.” He is culturally and politically a PanAfrikan nationalist. He believes that Afrikan people are Afrikans wherever we are found. I.e., the Afrikan warrior scholar believes that he should unselfishly employ the same dedication and energy to the defense and empowerment of Afrikans everywhere. The warrior scholar is not a racist. There is no confusion. His loyalty is conscious, race conscious, placing “Race First.” Or, as the Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey would say, Afrikan warrior scholars are “Race Men.” They know that to be pro-Black is not to be anti-white unless Europeans interfere with them doing their work. The Afrikan warrior scholar is an educator, not a teacher. He politically explains conditions so that his children, his students, will become better warrior scholars than he. Teachers only dispense another’s information in order to train their students to become nonthinking citizens in an alien culture and society. The warrior scholar does not separate word from act. Leaving his people without a viable example to guide them in freeing their minds would be beneath his Afrikan reasoning. The Afrikan warrior scholar is a worker of the first order and, therefore, a leader by example. He is a doer, a nationbuilder, a maker of his people’s way. In this respect, he is a nonintellectual in that he practically applies his knowledge. He does not see war waged in some debate, whether great or small. There must be a field application of tactics and strategies. As an educator, he fits information into reality. He understands the cultural ourstory which has created his people’s conditions and distorted their vision. He studies the problem, internally and externally, not those victimized by it. He does not define Afrikans as the core problem. And whatever internal symptoms he observes are logically attributed to our “cultural misorientation.” He does not pass on his miseducation. He corrects it. He educates himself so that he can teach an ancient Afrikan truth. Therefore, he reads a revolutionary ourstory, the theory of causes and solutions to our people’s problems. He feeds himself and the community from the library he builds. The Afrikan warrior scholar unconditionally respects Afrikan women. He is their defender, their lover, their divine complement. The Afrikan warrior scholar is an entrepreneur. He instills independence in other Afrikans by finding a way to provide, regardless of circumstance. He creatively controls the process of production, the input, throughput and output. He distinguishes wealth from income and power from influence. He pursues empowerment, not subintegration, because he knows that the quality of a substance is felt through its ability to autonomously determine its path. He creates meaningful employment, even if only because he knows that poverty spawns antagonism among a people. The Afrikan warrior scholar is a perimeter defender. He is the first line of defense for our people, for our most valuable resources, our elders, women and children. He is always prepared for any exigency. Afrikan warrior scholars are exacters of justice, using nonviolence as only one tactic in a collection of measures making up his strategic arsenal. He speaks to Europeans in their language. And he also speaks in the language of those Afrikans who mentacidally seek to help destroy our community. His words cut deep and clean. No one leaves with doubt as to his intent. He protects his daughters from misguided sons and sons from confused peers. He is ready to die for his children, biological and otherwise.”
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WARRIOR RULES:

– I have an unqualified love and respect for my/our children, complement, fellow warriors and Elders.

– I believe in our “Race First.”

– I do not sleep with my enemies. I have no white (or other nonAfrikan) bed partners and do not procreate with them.

– I am strictly heterosexual. I neither condone, support nor promote sexual insanity.

– I am not an interracialist. I do not have “white friends.”

– I do not associate with enemies unless my survival depends on it.

– I look to the wisdom of my Ancestors and Elders for direction.

– I am prepared for any exigency.

– I dress for war not display. A traditional sense of decency always guides my appearance.

– I daily listen to consciousness raising, revolutionary music.

– I am a thinker, not an intellectual. I apply what I know.

– I am deeply spiritual (not religious).

– I do not align myself with enemy based (communist/socialist/internationalist) organizations.

– I uncompromisingly work toward the complete and total liberation, empowerment and sovereignty of Afrikan people.

– I am not contradictory in what I think, say and do.

– I am resilient. I never give up.

Mwalimu K. Bomani Baruti

Straight out of KEMET(Neters With Attributes)

This is a video by author African Creation Energy.  He has some books with great historical information on Africa. His books cover things like African science,Maat and mathematics.  I thought this video of his was an interesting and different perspective on the film about rap group NWA.  It’s much different than most.  Some people think a little deeper than most. Most people tend to look at only the surface.  It’s not always a bad thing to look a bit deeper.

NWA- KemetAC Energy

Be sure to check out the brothers website:http://www.africancreationenergy.com/

Who is Edward Wilmot Blyden?

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Before there was a Malcolm X, a Kwame Nkrumah, a Marcus Garvey, or a George Padmore, there was Edward Wilmot Blyden, the Father of Pan Africanism.

Edward Wilmot Blyden was born in 1832 in the territories now known as the Virgin Islands. Like most Black men of his day, Blyden’s parents were slaves and descendants of Nigeria’s Nri Kingdom.

From a young age, Blyden demonstrated exceptional intelligence, and by the age of 18, he was prepared for college.

Many of us who come into Pan-Africanism do so because we come to a gradual realization that we were born into a system that was not organized for our benefit. The same could be said of Edward Blyden. When Blyden arrived in the United States to attempt to enroll in Rutgers Theological College, he was denied admission based on race – an event that would change Blyden’ s life forever. Rather than endure the horrors of America during the 1850s, Blyden joined thousands of other Black Americans in moving to the newly established Republic of Liberia. Liberia was then one of only two modern countries in Sub-Saharan Africa without roots in the European colonization of Africa, and was created as a direct result of the Back to Africa Movement.

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Shortly after his arrival, Blyden was introduced and married to the niece of Liberia’s Vice President, Hilary Yates, giving him inside access to African politics.

At the ripe old age of 30, Blyden was appointed professor of classics at the newly opened Liberia College, a position he held until 1871. Although Blyden was self-taught after high school, he became ‘an able linguist, classicist, theologian, historian, and sociologist.’ according to biographical references.

From 1871 until 1873, Blyden spent an increasing amount of time in neighboring Sierra Leone as the editor of the world’s first Pan-African magazine titled Negro. This first foray into journalism inspired further writings of genius. “…Blyden, while in Lagos, wrote regularly for the Lagos Weekly Record, one of the earliest propagators of Nigerian and West African nationalism.

He also operated in Freetown, Sierra Leone, where he helped to edit the Sierra Leone News, which he had assisted in founding in 1884 ‘to serve the interests of West Africa…and the [black] race generally.’ He also helped to found and edit there, the Freetown West African Reporter (1874-1882), whose declared aim was, even in those early years, to forge a bond of unity among English-speaking West Africans.” – Source

Blyden would call Liberia his home for the next 30 years, and there he would become a successful Presbyterian minister, a newspaper editor, a renowned professor of classics,  Ambassador to Great Britain, Minister of the Interior, Secretary of State, and a Presidential candidate in 1885.

Although Blyden had been raised in the white Christian Presbyterian church, by 1886 he had completely renounced Christianity and had converted to Islam. The following year, he published his treatise, Christianity, Islam and the Negro Race. In it, Blyden offered a wealth of thought on the reasons Islam was more suited to the needs of Black folk than Christianity. The book was immediately hailed as a masterful achievement, and is still in print and circulation today. According to Blyden,  Christianity demoralized Blacks,whereas Islam was ‘a unifying and elevating influence’.

By then, Blyden had left his home in Liberia to spread his message to the neighboring country of Sierra Leone, holding debates among the indigenous communities that were at risk of being “whitewashed” . He warned them that they had been “de-Africanised “, and to always that “you are Africans”. In Liberia, Blyden had taken on the mantle of state work, but in Sierra Leone, he was free to become the activist that he would become known as.

There were three primary points that Blyden believed could lead to the redemption of African people worldwide:

1. Complete autonomy from White culture, colonialism, and religious influence.

2. The establishment of a major, single, modern African state, which would protect and promote the interests of peoples of African descent everywhere.

3.  The complete adoption of the African personality, including the Islamic faith, in place of Eurocentric mimicry.

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Such was his dedication to Islam, African culture, and Pan-African thought, that in 1901, Sierra Leone awarded him with the position of Director of Muslim Education –  a billet that he would hold for 5 years. With his position came the responsibility of teaching English to Muslim youths, bridging the divide between Muslims and Christians in Africa, and establishing a harmonious co-existence.

The works of Blyden had a deep, long-lasting impact on one of the greatest Trinidadian journalists to ever live,  George Padmore. Padmore, along with men like Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta, the Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah and South Africa’s Peter Abrahams. Blydens lessons were not lost on the founder of The Negro World, Marcus Garvey either.

Blyden died in Freetown on 7 February1912, at the age of 82. He still has surviving family members in Sierra Leone, who commemorate his anniversary each year.

Today, Blyden’s name is all but forgotten. In celebrating Black History Month, we should remember that it was Blyden who most profoundly impacted men like Carter G. Woodson!

Article from website http://www.panafricanalliance.com/