R. Kelly: Sexual Predator or Scapegoat?

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I anticipate that this post will be unpopular. I acknowledge the contention that my assertions will certainly prompt and welcome the scathing comments in the section below. With that being said, I still very must feel that my perspective is worthy of articulation and exposure to those that care to listen.

Singer and R&B legend R.Kelly made headlines this week for allegedly assembling a sex cult consisting of underaged girls. These allegations bear a disturbing connection to R. Kelly’s previous trouble with the law, portraying Kelly as a an OJ-like figure–a haughty  recidivist who finagled through the loopholes of the American legal system.
I feel obliged to state that I have no respect for R. Kelly as a man. I do however, respect his talent. I perceive the ‘Pied Piper’ as an enslaved black who used America’s need to hyper sexualize the black man as a means to foment his career. While Kelly defiantly made family friendly songs like “Step in The Name of Love” and inspirational songs like “I Believe I Can Fly” and “The World’s Greatest” most of Kelly’s hits are sexualized slow jams to which I’m sure proved background music to the conception of many post millennials. His sexualized image fueled a career spanning over two decades with a plethora of adoring black female fans.

These fans remained loyal to Kelly even after a video surfaced of the singer issuing a golden shower to a then-fifteen year old girl. The charges were eventually dropped and buried in the past of a musician who was still able to maintain his mogul stature despite dramatic changes in the music industry.
While my argument is not to pardon R. Kelly from blame, it is that he is not the primary cause of the hyper-sexualized black female body that faces violation without consequence. R. Kelly was relieved of any legal responsibility in previous allegations of sexually violating a black female teen simply because the black female body bears no significance to the Western world outside of monetary gain. Consider how quickly the western world kills and incarcerates the black body.  The reason why Kelly was not susceptible to these consequences is not because of his riches, but because his “crimes” served an integral purpose in maintaining white supremacy. Moreover, the world was and is more interested in portraying Kelly and his victim as sexual beasts than to upholding the integrity of those they do not see as a human let alone bearing the presumed innocence of femininity or childhood.
To the western gaze, the hyper sexuality of the young black female body violently seduces Kelly. To this same gaze, Kelly is a sexualized being unable to resist the callings of his bestial urges. Together, these caricatured images of black sexuality function assemble the historical narrative of blacks as primitive and underdeveloped beings worthy of the death and incarceration that befalls them.

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Kelly, a melanated individual who believes his conventional success consummates his transition to whiteness, feels as entitled to young bodies as the white man did and does to young black females. Kelly, is a symbol of what happens when a morally impoverished black youth offsets a journey to acquire physical wealth and not a collective consciousness. As members of an oppressed collective, it is essential that we proceed with consciousness. To proceed without it, is to inevitably mirror our oppressors in thought and action.

There is also a large possibility that this ordeal is entirely fictional, and yet another means to lynch a black man by the rope of hyper sexuality. But the verity of these accusations does little to supersede its societal function. The scenario depicts how the black man and women are commonly pitted against one another and how the black male is villanized for implementing what he was nurtured to idolize—white male ideology.

The teachings of white supremacy are second nature to anyone not possessing a conscious gaze. I read The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, a few years back and was mortified at what Pecola’s father does to her on the kitchen floor. I resented Morrison for years, holding her in contempt for depicting the black man as indifferently robbing his child of her innocence.

It took me several strides into consciousness to realize that the father was a man systemized and nurtured to become an animal, a subjugate human who performs the dirty work of his master in his oppressed state. This is not an excuse, as his actions are detestable and hard to read, yet even more difficult to process as a factual fate rendered to so many blacks throughout the diaspora silent in the shame of their systemic violation.

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Kelly symbolically stands in the same image of this fictional black man who encompasses the factual narrative of so many other black males castrated by earthly demons who program the black body to inflict white evil onto their own people.

Kelly’s actions function to lure black women from blackness into the arms of feminism–yet example of society’s dedication to turning racist issues into sexist issues to further the cyclical disenfranchisement of blacks by hurling our struggle into oblivion. A second offense by a black praised for his prodigious talent, serves another blow to our collective identity alongside similar allegations afforded to other black greats like the late Michael Jackson, Bill Cosby, Kobe Bryant, amongst others. These allegations function to fuel white esteem and denigrate black collective worth in staining the black psyche with portraits of themselves that seemingly lack a moral compass.

So, to those quick to compartmentalize a black man as a sexual villain— I would like to redirect your attention to the words of the late and great Malcolm X:

“If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.”

To what contempt will you hold a system that upholds the systemic soiling of black female bodies?

To reiterate I am in no way excusing Kelly, but evoking a sense of nationalism to assert that we as a collective have been wronged by a system that lures us to incessantly blame ourselves but seldom confront the  true villain and sole benefactor of global racism.

In closing, the power of blackness lies largely in realizing if and when we are being played. So while we may not be playing chess, our systemized state as blacks bears a close resemblance to a king being used to seize the most powerful piece of the game–his queen.

Article by CC Saunders

Why I will not be seeing Wonder Woman

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I almost did it. I selected a theatre and even looked up showtimes. As I began to mentally assemble my outfit and rework my schedule to accommodate viewing the film, I realized that I was all too familiar with this story.

Wonder Woman is yet another page in the consistent white female narrative designed to portray white beauty intertwined with an earthly anglicism. I need not see this film to know that it will portray the white Woman as the catalyst for all things good in a “bad” world.

Contrary to the ideally nurtured in the western world, the bad is seldom blatant. Both the individual and the collective have a fair chance at combatting that which they can see. The true “bad” in the world lies in Wonder Woman-like figures, whose embedded message seeks to uplift through depicting the very exclusivity that dominates the western hemisphere.

Wonder Women debuts in a climate that veils this exclusivity with the implication of “change.” Seemingly every film and television series has adopted the feminist agenda, avidly if not aggressively, feeding this fictive utopia to the masses. The film exists to promote feminism as the cure to all worldly evils, omitting of course that feminism is a worldly evil. Clad in a form-fitting costume with long and silky dark hair, Wonder Woman encompasses the conventional sexiness of a blonde with the rarity of a red head to project feminism as the height of femininity. Wonder Woman is a dark haired, dark- eyed white Woman–the pseudo “every woman” in seeming to encompass lightness and darkness simultaneously. What the casual gaze may fail to see, is that Wonder Woman resembles her target audience, and encompasses all her acquired audience wishes to become.  Her dark hair provides a strategic contrast to her fair skin, painting the “Wonder” of wonder woman as encompassing the figurative light to societal conflict or darkness.

The wonder in Wonder Woman is that she embodies the antidote to all the world’s problems. She’s Helen of Troy mixed with Hilary Clinton–a savior to white women but a mortal enemy to the woman of a darker hue.

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Western childhood functions similar to this film, painting the white Woman as Wonder Woman in far less attractive variants. From the abundant white female school teachers, to the tooth fairy, Mrs. Claus, every princess from Cinderella to Snow White, the white female body is a consistent figure of humanity to the western gaze.  These figures function to embed into the black female psyche what “Superman” and “Batman” seek to implement into the general western psyche–that if you are white, anything is possible.

But as the young girl who reads these stories, attends these schools and watches these figures on television grows up, the fantasy of Wonder Woman vanishes into reality.  Instead the harsh world eventually prompts the once naive black body to wonder what was ever wonderful about these pristine figures of their childhood. Although portrayed as the hero in fictive and real scenarios, the white woman is gradually unveiled as an inevitable villain to the black female body.

So, as a black woman, I know this film functions as erasure. I know this film functions to seduce me into a amnesiac state where I falsely separate white female action and intention from white male supremacists. From the white women who chase our black men than scream rape when it goes sour, or objectify our wealthy black men as cash registers, or reduce the quotidian black man to his genitals, to the white women who abrasively target black women at work, back to the very white women who tormented the black female slaves—this movie functions to force the black psyche to accept a white hero, despite centuries of white female villainy.

White heroes, whether male, female, trans, or what have you, are never capable of saving anyone but themselves. For healing is incompatible to the autocrat, who decorates their lives with the blood of the oppressed.

Wonder Woman

Therefore, the true wonder woman will never occupy a leading role in mainstream film. She probably will never make six figures and is unlikely to rouse a shallow gaze on the street.

The true wonder woman has probably yet to arrive home from her twelve-hour work-day, her twenty-four hour job as a mother, or full- time victim of white supremacy. The true Wonder Woman sleeps at night with a six-figure debt heavy on her conscious from daring to dream outside of the confines of systemic oppression. She walks through a neighborhood of businesses owned by any and everyone but those who look like her. She faces ridicule for her skin tone, her nose, and curvy body and faces countless queries if her beauty or attributes are deemed outside the scope of blackness.  The true wonder woman is literally and figuratively raped, never respected, or rewarded. She is frozen in time, pieces of her flesh still floating throughout the Atlantic Ocean, or concealed in an unmarked grave beneath a skyscraper. She is dismembered by a system who uses her limbs to assemble their privilege and writes their laws in her blood.

She is the unspoken gospel of this poached land—the original statue of liberty—the feminine mold to which every race, ethnicity, and creed stealthy covets.

The Wonder Woman film exists to place the “wonder” into the woman concept. As a being excluded from this concept, I replace wonder with “black.” For the black woman does not need wonder, she is wonder. Furthermore, members of the black female collective need not go to the movies to view this fictive wonder woman—they must simply look in the mirror.

Article by CC Saunders

Black Transgender Women/Men: Redefining Womanhood?

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Take a real good look at this person.  This is a black man. Or is it? Well I guess it depends on who you ask.  This person on the cover of Metro Weekly is Janet Mock.  The tagline on the magazine says “mighty real”.  Which is very misleading since there is not much real when looking at this cover.  You see Janet Mock  was born a man.  Which means he has a penis.   As far as I know he hasn’t had his penis removed so he’s still a man. But that’s my definition.  But according to this deranged European culture I’m living in I’m supposed to call him a woman. But isn’t Janet just a man in a dress? If I put on an astronaut suit does it make me an astronaut? If I paint myself white does it make me a white man?  I wouldn’t think so.  But the fact they we have to call these people a certain gender because it’s what they “feel” like shows you we are way off course.  We have really lost our minds.

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And what’s really scary is that more and more black people are accepting this false reality.  One of the most popular men  in this transgender movement  is Laverne Cox(pic above).  Cox has been on numerous mainstream magazine covers. He’s been on so many I’ve lost count.  Covers that many authentic black women have never been on.  Why is that?  Is the racist white media trying to redefine black womanhood? Are they trying to portray black women as more masculine by having men imitate them? Sure looks like it to me.  I think it’s a way to destroy the divine feminine principle. It seems like a combination of both sexism and racism.  In a way it’s an insult to both black men and women. Are they trying to get rid of black alpha males? This is really sick and twisted!

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Amiyah Scott....

Then we have actor Amiyah Scott. Amiyah is on the drama Star. Star is produced by well known homosexual Lee Daniels.  Much like his other show Empire,Star is full of masculine lesbians,homosexuals,transgenders,violence,crime and interracial sex.  All the things Daniels loves to portray as normal for the black community.  By having more transgenders on network television it normalizes it.  Which is the purpose in my view.

I don’t really follow the transgender/homosexual culture so I never knew about this.  But they actually have transgender contests.  It’s really big in Atlanta.  The video(above) is a contest in which men compete to see who looks the most like a woman.  It’s called the “I AM BALL” contest.  I could tell they were all men so I don’t know how the hell you pick  a winner.

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Not to be left out but they also have a competition for a female to male transition.  This is were females compete to see who looks the most like a man. This is really crazy to watch.  I can’t believe they actually have a contest for this type of thing.  What the hell is going on in Atlanta? I thought it was knows as “Black Mecca”.  Is this what our people are now embracing?

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche is a Nigerian writer of novels and short stories.  In the video(above) she says that you can’t compare the struggles of women that were born women with transwomen.  She says that it’s not the same thing because they have been women since birth.  Just so you know the term being used today is cisgender. You will hear terms like cis male or cis female.  Which means “male assigned male at birth”. Assigned??  I thought that you are whatever you were at birth.  But you see how they’re making up all these terms to confuse us. Well at any rate Adiche was attacked by actor Laverne Cox. Cox disagreed with Adiche’s statement.   Although she didn’t address Adiche directly,here’s the statement by Cox:

“I was talking to my twin brother today about whether he believes I had male privilege growing up. I was a very feminine child though I was assigned male at birth. My gender was constantly policed. I was told I acted like a girl and was bullied and shamed for that. My femininity did not make me feel privileged. I was a good student and was very much encouraged because of that but I saw cis girls who showed academic promise being nurtured in the black community I grew up in in Mobile, Ala. Gender exists on a spectrum & the binary narrative which suggests that all trans women transition from male privilege erases a lot of experiences and isn’t intersectional. Gender is constituted differently based on the culture we live in. There’s no universal experience of gender, of womanhood. To suggest that is essentialist & again not intersectional. Many of our feminist foremothers cautioned against such essentialism & not having an intersectional approach to feminism. Class, race, sexuality, ability, immigration status, education all influence the ways in which we experience privilege so though I was assigned male at birth I would contend that I did not enjoy male privilege prior to my transition. Patriarchy and cissexism punished my femininity and gender nonconformity. The irony of my life is prior to transition I was called a girl and after I am often called a man. Gender policing & the fact that gender binaries can only exist through strict policing complicates the concept of gendered privilege & that’s OK cause it’s complicated. Intersectionality complicates both male and cis privilege. This is why it is paramount that we continue to lift up diverse trans stories. For too many years there’s been far too few trans stories in the media. For over 60 years since Christine Jorgensen stepped off the plane from Europe and became the first internationally known trans woman the narrative about trans folks in the media was one of macho guy becomes a woman. That’s certainly not my story or the stories of many trans folks I know. That narrative often works to reinforce binaries rather than explode them. That explosion is the gender revolution I imagine,one of true gender self determination.”

What was this garbage?  This Cox character has lost his mind! All this talk of gender policing and gender binaries is total nonsense.  He was assigned male at birth because he is a MAN.  It’s just that simple.  All these terms are just going to confuse the younger generation.  They will see homosexuals,lesbians and transgenders as just normal behavior.    This is why men like Cox,Janet Mock and Amiyah Scott are given books and television appearances.

Gender neutral....

This is another reason people are debating gender neutral restrooms.  Why is this even a debate?  A man in a dress should not be able to go into a women’s restroom.  There are little girls in there.  No one wants a man pretending to be a woman in a women’s restrooms.  And I don’t think most men would want a transgender men in a men’s restroom.  This shows you how sick European culture has become.  It is going right down the toilet.  And this is all by design.  And this is a serious issue for black people because we live among them.  It is destroying how we view sexuality and womanhood. As I said before I think it’s a way of redefining black womanhood. And to destroy the divine feminine principle.  I hope black people are paying attention.  We are truly living in Hell.

2017 Women’s March: Black Female Perspective

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Following Trump’s inauguration a series of Women’s Marches occurred throughout North America. The protests erupted to preserve the female liberties seemingly threatened by a “conservative” president who boasted of sexually assaulting women. As a female, I empathize and even support the initiatives that foment this March. However, although a woman, I know that I am inevitably black first. Thus, I can’t help but feel that by supporting the women’s march is to support the very means of my oppression.

On my a tri-weekly journey to a previous job, I recall seeing a number of protestors outside of Planned Parenthood at the wee hours of the morning seeking to shame female patrons. One protestor stood out from the others—an elderly white man surely north of seventy-five. He stood hunched over, holding an oaktag with a message written in ballpoint pen. I did not bother to read the poster, but judging by the stoic expression on his face, he was there to cast the stones of white male privilege onto the female body. Standing at the intersectionality of race and gender, the black woman knows this gaze all to well. While the literal gaze casts itself onto the black female body countless places throughout North America, the figurative gaze consumes black femininity in its entirety. The women’s march solely speaks to the “woman” component of this gaze, eliminating the most defining characteristic of black female identity.

Reproductive rights in general proves controversial to  the black female trajectory. A quick glance at history reveals that the black female endured sheer deprivation in terms of reproductive rights—her body used as means for mayoral economic franchisement. White women too encompassed an existence that also regarded them as property, however their fair skin warranted privileges denied to the black female body. These exclusive liberties afforded to white women illustrate the concept of “woman” as a privilege solely applicable to non-male whites. Consider the phrasing “black” woman. The label “Black woman” illustrates that black female intersectionality separates black females from the term’s initial meaning. For any “woman” of another marginalized faction, their race or ethnicity always precedes the term woman—proving their genitals deem them female but their race and ethnicity is first and foremost. Femininity is also a privilege extended exclusively to non-male whites. This exclusivity persists as the black female body only earns femininity when adopting western aesthetics and behavior.

Given the exclusivity of the term “woman,” I find it quite disturbing that white women ( and other oppressed groups) call on the black women for support in their times of distress, yet alienate the black female body when their children, brothers and fathers lay slain on the streets or untagged in the morgue. How many white women “said her name” after Sandra Bland was murdered? How many white women were overtly outraged after the Trayvon Martin verdict was rendered?

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To take a trip down memory lane, how many white female feminists supported Tawana Brawley in her 1988 trial? If autonomy over the female body is right every woman deserves- why was their no feminist congregation when this young, black girl was sexually assaulted by a number of white men? The answer is simple.  Issues that engage both blackness and femininity become “black” issues instantaneously. This fact reveals that feminism is simply not built to encompass intersectional identities and thereby is not equipped to extinguish black female disenfranchisement.

It seems that former President Barack Obama’s victory disgruntled feminists, who supported this victory as long as it was a symbol of the feminist victory to follow.  It seems feminists felt that history would repeat itself. Namely, black male voting privilege preceded white female voting liberties.  Thus, feminists deemed Clinton’s victory inevitable following Obama’s 2008 victory. Dr. Angela Davis expressed a similar sentiment in the following excerpt from her book Women, Race and Class,

“The representative women of the nation have done their uttermost for the last thirty years to secure freedom for the negro; and as long as he was lowest in the scale of being, we were willing to press his claims, but now, as the celestial gate to civil rights is sIowly moving on its hinges, it becomes a serious question whether we had better stand aside and see ‘Sambo’ walk into the kingdom first.” (Davis 70)

Now that it seems that the black collective has something that the white female collective does not, the bells of white privilege right loudly under the veil of feminism.

Feminism functions to afford white women the same liberties as white men. The main component of these liberties is racism—deeming black female participation in any feminist activity injurious. Thus, to participate in a woman’s march as a black woman is to   march along to the stagnant beat of white supremacy. For the black woman is a queen, but to the western world she will never truly be  a woman.

Article written by C.C. Saunders

Zionist Jews wanted Donald Trump all along!

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Well the election is over now.  I don’t want black people to get too upset.  I told you before we never had a dog in this race. Killary Clinton is a warmonger,feminist,racist witch.  And Trump is a racist,sexist,self absorbed buffoon.  He may be a good businessman but a buffoon nonetheless.  But he is also a puppet for the Zionist Jews.  Clinton is a covert racist.  She panders to black people by going to black churches and pretending to be down with our struggle.  Trump didn’t do all that.  He spoke directly to poor whites who felt disenfranchised.  White people who felt they were not represented in the last eight years.  His whole platform was a softer version of white nationalism.  And white folks ran out in droves at the polls!  I can’t say I’m surprised.  Trump can’t be any worse than Obama.  Obama did more for Hispanics and homosexuals than blacks. What did Obama do for the black collective? Go ahead I’ll wait……………….

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But I believe the elite always wanted Trump in office.  Clinton thought he was so racist and sexist that she couldn’t lose.  She thought it made her look better by comparison. Well she thought wrong.  Who knows…maybe some of his policies will help black people indirectly.  Obama was too scared to do anything for black people.  Or he wasn’t allowed to.  So lets see what happens in the Trump era.  We are filling up the prisons.  Black families are falling apart. Millions of black people are unemployed. Unarmed black people are killed by the police.  Can it get any worse??

 

Kushite Kingdom Awards 2016

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Welcome to the first Kushite Kingdom Awards! I usually deal with a lot of current events and topics my subscribers like to discuss.  But I’m not serious all the time.  I like to laugh and joke around like everyone else.  So I thought I would do something a little fun.  I also wanted to show a token of appreciation to all the black bloggers who have given me great information and food for thought. It’s a real battle out here in the blogosphere. And I appreciate all the words of encouragement from fellow bloggers.    This is not a real competition.  This is all meant in fun.  As you will see from some of the categories. But let me know your picks in the categories.  If enough people like this awards edition I may make it an annual event. So be sure to cast your votes and add anyone to the list I may have left out. My apologies to anyone that didn’t make the list.  Don’t hold it against me.  I appreciate all my subscribers. Peace.

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warrior-king

Nat Turner Award-Favorite Male Blogger

1.Land of Kam

2. Onitaset Kumat

3.Black My Story

4.Nidotopian Warrior

5.Lumumba Afrika

6.Hung Like Jesus

7.Moorbey

8.Aniga Shakur

9.Amos Magazine

10. Melanated Man

11. AfrikaNeeds

12. Wyzedome

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Harriet Tubman Award-Favorite Female Blogger

  1. Diary of a Negress
  2. TruthAngel07
  3. Kelley
  4. Original Black Woman
  5. Sunny D
  6. Malaika Mutere
  7. Roshumba Monique
  8. Trojan Pam
  9. Shelby Courtland
  10. Tired Sista
  11. C.C. Saunders
  12. Cree7

Favorite Post by a Male Blogger

  1. Globalization and Religion of Scarcity- BlackMyStory
  2. War on Black People Part 1:Education- Black Eyebawse
  3. An Ode to the Lost Children-Nidotopian Warrior
  4. So What is Human?- One Tawny Stanger
  5. The Black Man-Black Woman Relationship-Melanated Man
  6. Black & Brown Coalition- Authentic African Vanguard
  7. Eyes a Free Man Massa!- Cliff Green
  8. People trying to escape their Ancestry-Afrika Needs
  9. The Rape of Horus- Hugh Cipher
  10. They care more about Harambe than Michael Brown- 4th Angels Bowl

Favorite Post by a Female Blogger

  1. Manifestation for a New Mother- Tahtahme
  2. Hillary Clinton,A Nasty Woman!- Shelby Courtland
  3. The Beast and The Goddess-Roshumba Monique
  4. Locked,Stocked and Ready to Roll- Diary of a Negress
  5. Lipstick and Heels: Black Business Spotlight- C.C. Saunders
  6. Is the Roots remake a History Lesson-Trojan Pam
  7. Mother-Kelley
  8. The White Bitch!-TruthAngel07
  9. Original Black Beauties of the Day- Original Black Woman
  10. Vital Note to Melanin People- Queen Adira

 

Favorite Musician

1.Watoto from the Nile

2.United Front

3.OSHUN

4. Richard Raw

5.Maafa Sankofa

6.Tahir RBG

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chantel-keona

Most Beautiful Female Blogger

  1. Nekisha Lewis
  2. Sunny D.
  3. Kelley
  4. Chantel Keona
  5. Jeanette Ayala
  6. Eileen Dautruche
  7. Malaika Mutere

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Best Athlete

  1. Lebron James
  2. Derrick Rose
  3. Serena Williams
  4. Usain Bolt
  5. Allyson Felix
  6. Floyd Mayweather

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dewanda1

Most Beautiful Black Woman

  1. Sira Kante
  2. Yaya DaCosta
  3. Emayatzy Corinealdi
  4. Teyana Taylor
  5. Nandi Mngoma
  6. Lesliana Pereira
  7. Nomzamo Mbatha
  8. DeWanda Wise
  9. Simone Missisk
  10. Lerato Kganyago

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Most Outspoken Mulatto

1.Colin Kaepernick

2.Jesse Williams

3. Zaza Ali

4. J. Cole

5. Barack Obama

Favorite Sellout Buffoon

1.Kodak Black(watch the video)

2. Roland Martin(Buck danced with Hillary Clinton)

3. Lil Wayne (said ne never experienced racism)

4.Mary J. Blige(singing to Hillary Clinton)

5. Stephen A. Smith(always defends white supremacy,attacks black people)

Biggest Interracial Sellout

  1. Tika Sumpter(white baby daddy)
  2. Eddie Murphy(white baby mama)
  3. Alfre Woodard(white husband)
  4. Nate Parker (white wife)
  5. Charles Barkley(white wife)

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Most Honest White Supremacist

1.Tomi Lahren

2. Hillary Clinton

3.Donald Trump

4. Ann Coulter

5. Sean Hannity

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Best Impersonation of a Black Person

  1. Shaun King
  2. Kim Kardashian
  3. Iggy Azalea
  4. Rachel Dolezal
  5. Robin Thicke

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Biggest threat to Black Liberation and Unity

1.Interracial Marriage

2. Feminism

3. Homosexual Agenda

4.Misogyny

5. Negrophobia(Black self hatred)

6. Fake Black Leaders

7. All of the above

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Lifetime Coon Achievement Award: Morgan Freeman (Honorable mention: Charles Barkley,Don Lemon and Jesse Lee Peterson)

 

next-year