NCAA March Madness: Exploiting Black Athletes?

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Every March, people in The US create brackets, place bets on winning teams, picking teams, and winning money while watching March Madness.

But The NCAA on the other hand is making millions and billions from ad revenue for a 30 second ads and in fact, they extract over a billion dollars each year from the black community that is going in the bank accounts of mostly white coaches, commentators, athletic directors, and other high ranking white officials.

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The athletes that play in March Madness every year are the biggest losers in the tournament because the big universities they play for like Kentucky or North Carolina systemically keep them distracted by showing them with the fans, girls, draconian practice schedules, etc while they are behind the scenes counting the money they make off the exploitation of unpaid athletic labor.

These universities also systemically keep black athletes away from black students so that the black students wouldn’t fill their heads with “radical” ideas, especially during March Madness.

One example of this was a March 1997 black student protest at The University Of Kentucky that took place after a black woman named Tanya Clay was attacked by white male students telling her “If you don’t like your life here, we’ll end it for you” after she spoke about the racial issues that were happening on campus.

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The Kentucky Basketball Team was heading to The Final Four that year and the black students had asked the athletes to speak out about the issue and the athletes had zero interest in doing anything on behalf of their community and one of the basketball players had pulled a black male writer to the side and told him, “The coaches didn’t want them reading his articles because he was explaining why college athletes should be getting paid and the coaches didn’t even want them to know about that“.

One of the most eggregious forms of the exploitation of black college athletes by The NCAA happened a few years ago when Kevin Ware, a former Louisville Cardinals basketball player who won a national title with them had broke his leg in a nationally televised March Madness game against The Duke Blue Devils and there was an outpouring of support from NBA players, commentators, and fans.

But The NCAA decided to despicably exploit his injury by selling a shirt for $25 that had quickly sold out. While The NCAA, Louisville, and Adidas got their fair share from the shirt sales, Kevin Ware and his family didn’t even get a fraction of the money from the shirt sales because The NCAA doesn’t allow these athletes to profit off their own autograph, image, labor, and likeness.

The athletes are brainwashed by these big universities to believe that they are playing in March Madness to win and winning a national championship, but they are the biggest losers in March Madness and the universities only use these athletes up for a few years and dump them right back in the hood with a mediocre education. And like the rapper E-40 said many years ago, “They’ll find a new guy next year” and the title of the song he said that true statement in is called “To Whom It May Concern” and you can check it out on YouTube.

The Conclusion – Many former athletes that had the experience of playing in March Madness and The Final Four that got dumped back in the hood with a mediocre education need to speak up against this sick exploitation of our athletes, so the current athletes can also take a stand against the injustices of The NCAA.

Article written by Joe Davis

 

Have you ever heard of Sarah Baartman?

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Sarah Baartman is a name that every black person should know. You wont hear about her too much in the mainstream media. And with good reason. Mainly because Sarah’s body was exploited,much like black women today in rap videos. It is really sick to watch at times. It’s hard to see my sisters looked upon as a piece of meat. And I don’t even want to mention what they do with black women in the porn industry. To call it degrading what be a vast understatement. A little history about Sarah:Sarah Baartman was born to a Khoisan family in the vicinity of the Gamtoos River in what is now the Eastern Cape of South Africa.She was orphaned in a commando raid. Saartjie, pronounced “Sahr-kee”, is the diminutive form of her name; in Afrikaans the use of the diminutive form commonly indicates familiarity, endearment or contempt. Her birth name is unknown.
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Baartman was a slave of Dutch farmer named Peter Cezar near Cape Town, which had recently come under British control. Alexander Dunlop, a military surgeon with a sideline in supplying showmen in Britain with animal specimens, suggested she travel to England for exhibition. Lord Caledon, governor of the Cape, gave permission for the trip, but later regretted it after he fully learned the purpose of the trip. She left for London in 1810. Sarah was likewise uninformed of the true purpose of her trip. She was unaware that she would become an icon of racial inferiority and black female sexuality for the next 100 years. The above video is very well done and educational.