Black Mentacide: Accepting Degenerate Ghetto culture

Hip Hop Culture1.

Last week a friend of mine asked  me what I thought about the ” Do it for The D” challenge.   I wasn’t sure what he was talking about.  He said it’s a rap challenge that had went viral all over social media. It is where you do a rap and talk what you what do to get penis from a man.  There are also an alternative version in which men rap about what they would do get vagina from a woman. I find this pretty sick and disgusting!  Look how far we’ve sunk as a people.  You have rappers and black actors doing this stupid ass challenge.  Hip hop used to be about educating our people with knowledge.  The golden era(1980-90) of hip hop had artists like Public Enemy,X Clan,KRS ONE,Brand Nubian,The Jungle Brothers,A Tribe Called Quest and Queen Latifah.  At least they were either Afrocentric,pro-black and had conscious lyrics.  But ever since the mid-nineties it has hit an all time low.  I remember a few years back Nas dropped a Cd called Hip Hop is Dead.  I think he may be right. Now the culture is just operating on the lowest frequency.  Now they have children talking about shooting each other,acting like gangsters and being promiscuous.  This is nothing but mentacide.  It is the destruction of the black mind.  And it’s being done intentionally.

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And the video(above) shows celebrities like Issa Rae,Regina Hall,Keke Palmer,rapper Tyga,T-Boz, Gabrielle Union and Sanaa Lathan doing the challenge.  It was really disappointing to see Union and Lathan stooping to this garbage.  I have always thought they were beautiful and talented actresses.  They should know better than to do such a degenrate sexual challenge like this.  But the worst had to be Erykah Badu.  She and comedian Michael Blackson did the challenge.  I understand that Blackson is a silly ass comedian that you can’t take seriously.  But Erykah??  I thought she was supposed to be this deeply spiritual,conscious,holistic Afrocentric woman.  This woman is 46 years old with three children.  Is this what she wants her children to see??  Do they want to see their mother doing a “dick challenge”?  This is a new low for Erykah.  She makes good music but she’s not truly conscious in my opinion.  And these other celebrities should know better as well.  They should lead by example.  But the truth is they believe that ghetto ass hoodrat culture is authentic black culture.  They think they’re “keeping it real”.  In a sense they are…keeping it REAL ignorant! These celebrities are paid puppets. They go along whatever their rich white masters tell them to do.  As long as they’re getting paid they don’t care if they’re putting out negative stereotypes or contributing to black mentacide.  Are we niggas and hoodrats?  Do we want our black boys to  view manhood as how many women you can sleep with?  Do we want black girls to see themselves as ghetto hoodrats?  I would think not.  And videos like this show that celebs have no social responsibility.  And we have to protect our children from this madness.  It’s up to us to show a positive examples to our young ones.  This so-called challenge is deplorable in my opinion.

I love this video(above) by Goalden Chyld.  This rapper flipped this disgusting challenge on it’s head.  He did a positive and uplifting video entitled ” For the People Challenge”.  Now others are doing positive videos as well.  I salute this brother!  I hope this type of thing catches on.  But deep down I know it wont be as popular as the “do it for The D” videos.  This proves to me that black people have a serious mental illness.  We have been taught accept disgusting and over the top sexual themes as “authentic blackness”.   This type of mentality needs to change.  We got to do better.

Jamila Woods- VRY BLK

Happy New Year family!  I hope everyone has a prosperous 2017.  I thought some good music would be a great way to start off the new year.  I like this new artist Jamila Woods.  She’s been creating a lot of buzz since last year.  I love this song VRY BLK.  It’s very catchy and a great theme for this blog.  Here’s a little back story on Jamila.

Poet and vocalist Jamila Woods was raised in Chicago, IL and graduated from Brown University, where she earned a BA in Africana Studies and Theatre & Performance Studies. Influenced by Lucille Clifton and Gwendolyn Brooks, much of her writing explores blackness, womanhood & the city of Chicago. Her first chapbook, The Truth About Dolls (2012), was inspired by a Toni Morisson quote & features a Pushcart-nominated poem about Frida Kahlo. Her poetry is included in the anthologies The Breakbeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop (2015), Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls (2014), and The UnCommon Core: Contemporary Poems for Learning & Living (2013).

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Jamila is also a vocalist & songwriter, focusing primarily on soul/hip-hop centered music. Her musical lineage includes Erykah Badu, Imogen Heap, Kirk Franklin, and Kendrick Lamar. Raised in her church choir, Jamila’s musical aesthetic involves choral layering in addition to the hip-hop tradition of sampling & allusions. Her work with her band, M&O (fka Milo & Otis) has been featured by Okayplayer, Spin, JET and Ebony Magazine.

Jamila is currently the Associate Artistic Director of non-profit youth organization Young Chicago Authors, where she helps organize Louder Than A Bomb (the largest poetry festival in the world), designs curriculum for Chicago Public Schools, and teaches poetry to young people throughout the city.

Dynasty

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Queens-bred hip-hop/soul artist, Dynasty, has the soul of a dreamer and the fearless determination to follow that dream wherever it might lead. DY has lit up stages alongside some of your favorite artists including Erykah Badu, The Wu-Tang Clan, Talib Kweli and KRS One who proclaimed “THIS is a real emcee!” after catching her set.

Her performance on records and on the stage truly sets her apart. Dynasty writes from the heart yet at the same time, remains a beast on the mic. She has collaborated with legendary, world renowned artists such as Talib Kweli and DJ Premier who labeled her a “spit queen” based on her lyrical prowess. Influenced by gritty northern sounds and life’s adventures, she brings us a perfectly balanced raw and real experience through her music. She has toured internationally from Germany to Romania and beyond, performing and connecting with people of all ages and backgrounds.

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After spending a little more than a year working on other artistic endeavors (she is an actress and also runs an arts-based empowerment program, The PUSH Project) she is back to her first love, her music, which she refers to as hip hop/ soul. There is no “set demographic” for D.Y., no gimmick, no crafted agenda aside from making beautifully raw music. Her authentic mass appeal transcends all boundaries.

Rightfully so, soul music touches the world.

Clarification Needed:Real Conscious Sistas vs Fake Bohemian Women(Part 1)

This is a video by Tariq Nasheed. Tariq is a film producer/author/pick up artist.  In this video he talks about the fake Bohemian chicks.   I’ve heard this  term before.   Sometimes they are called fake conscious women,Hotep Hos and wannabe deep mystical women.  Tariq even calls them Herbal Tea chicks.  Yes he likes to be funny at times.  I guess he sees himself as a comedian.  Well he believes that most of them are freaks in bed and they all smoke weed.  He says whether they are black or white women.  Most of the white women I’ve seen who dress up like Rastafarians and wear their hair in “gold locks”  are just trying to sleep with black men.  White people look so silly trying to wear braids and locks in their hair.  But that’s another subject.  One thing I hate is broad generalizations.  Most of the sistas I meet who are Afrocentric  are not freaky whores.  I don’t think that’s an accurate description at all.  I will admit that many of them do wear their hair natural,many are vegan(not all),shop at farmers markets,into holistic health and like different oils and shea butter.  But so what?  There’s nothing wrong with wanting a healthier lifestyle  and wearing natural hair.

I love this natural hair video.  It showcases some lovely sistas.  I think this whole natural hair movement is a great thing.  I think it shows that black women don’t want to conform to European standards of beauty.  And this hair revolution has really caught on in the black conscious community.  I think we need to get rid of sick terms like “good hair”.  They are self destructive terms that instill anti-blackness.  Good hair is healthy hair. And I think we as black men should see this as a good thing that more black women are embracing their natural African-textured hair.  Most of the conscious women I’ve met have been down to earth decent sistas.  Most are not judgmental or mean spirited.  Most I’ve met have been very friendly and happy to meet a brother that has knowledge of self.  I’ve had great discussions with sistas about racism,feminism,misogyny,healthy diet,unemployment and the prison system. I don’t think we should make blanket statements about people like that.  I don’t think we should be poking fun at people gaining knowledge of self. They should be given props for putting forth the effort.

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I’ve had conscious sistas tell me they admire women like Marimba Ani,Frances Cress Welsing,Sister Souljah,Harriet Tubman,Betty Shabazz and Assata Shakur.  I think it’s a beautiful thing when black women can look up to sistas who tried to uplift our people.   I don’t think brothers should feel intimidated by the achievements of black women.   It doesn’t mean they are anti-men at all.  There’s no need to say they hate men or that they’re lesbians.   I realize that there are some black feminists that do honestly hate men.  I know because I have chatted with many of them on social media. But most sistas  I meet are not that way.  Also I think many of them have just been hurt by men in the past.  And it’s really sadness that they feel and it eventually turns into anger. Black women have a right to discuss their pain and suffering.  It’s okay for a sista to have an opinion. And we as black men should be open to hearing their voice.  The pain that many black women feel comes from the fact that many feel no one cares about them.  There are many memes on the internet that make fun of them.   By ignorant black men no less. Many calling their hair ugly and nappy.  And I’ve seen memes that poke fun at dark skinned women. I will be addressing this hatred of dark skin in an upcoming post. This is really anti-blackness at it’s core.  So I don’t think it’s funny to make fun of my conscious sistas. At least they’re putting forth the effort to learn about African culture,history and the greatness that is in our bloodline.  If anything we should be saluting these black women.  Not calling them fake Bohemian chicks.  It’s the same thing when they generalize conscious brothers as “fake hoteps” That will be addressed in part two.

Natural Hair

I just want all my conscious pro-black sistas to know that I love you.  Keep reading your African history books, eating vegan,burning incense,shopping at farmers markets,wearing headwraps and listening to Lauryn Hill  and Erykah Badu music.  Keep doing your thing!  Embrace your inner beauty as well as your outer beauty.  And know that you truly are the physical manifestation of God.  I applaud my sistas trying to better themselves and showing young black girls a better past.  Many conscious sistas were on the wrong path themselves and don’t want to see the younger generation make the same mistakes.  As we all know in African culture the mother is the first teacher. It’s really shame that we make fun of those who are trying to seek higher knowledge.  That shows how deep this anti-blackness goes.  We are  a damaged people and in need of healing.  So I leave you with this great video by Queen Afua. She speaks about the need for healing.  Which we really need right now. And no she is not some fake wannabe conscious woman.  She is the REAL deal.  Peace to all my sistas.  I love you. ❤

Erykah Badu- Hotline Bling(Remix)

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Soul songstress Erykah Badu is back!  This is the remix to Drake’s song Hotline Bling.  I must say I like it better than Drake’s version.

You used to call me on my cellular device at night
You used to call me on my cellular device at night
And I know when that hotline bling, that could only mean one thing
I know when that hotline bling, that could only mean one thing

(Verse 1)
Ever since I left the city you
Got a reputation for yourself now
Everybody knows and I feel left out
Boy, you got me down, and got me stressed out
Cause ever since I left the city, you
Started getting dressing, going out more
Glasses of champagne out on the dance floor
Hanging with some dudes I’ve never seen before

(Repeat Chorus)

(Verse 2)
Them people just said let it go
And on and on and such and such
But they don’t ride around with us
No, no, no
Ain’t that too bad we love to hang
And for a while, it stays the same
But now you tryna change the game
No, no, no

(Repeat Chorus)

(Bridge)
Late night when you need my love
Late night when you need my love
Late night when you need my love
Late night when you need my love

Oshun-Stuck

This is my new favorite music duo. Femme fatale tandem OSHUN lift their heads above the (not just) knee deep pool of modern r&b to introduce a sound that draws less on the melancholy, often gothic tones we associate with future soul, feeling much closer to dawning of a new Daisy Age. Comprising NYU students Niambi Sala and Thandiwe, the duo has taken to heart the soulful, sampladelic and socially aware artistry of OKP champions like Erykah Badu, the mighty Roots crew and Lauryn Hiland synthesized them into a new and true sound that blends the strongest of all of their respective suits in lyricism, composition and melodics.

Nowhere is this more clear than their freshly-pressed clip for the dulcet, Rhodes-soaked and vibe-heavy joint “Stuck”. It finds the duo of supple altos delivering tender and affectionate lines about life, love and culture, revealing the makings of a whole new wave of SoulquariansWell-versed in Yoruba folklore, spirituality and their broad spectrum of music.I love these young ladies. I think they have a great future ahead of them. They’re really talented.They give me hope for the next generation of music makers.This is the type of image our young girls need to see. Give it a listen and let me know of you like it.