Bill Cosby convicted! What about the others?

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SO BILL COSBY IS CONVICTED.  THESE WOMEN SAY HE DRUGGED THEM THEN RAPED THEM.  SOME OF THE CASES ARE OVER TWENTY YEARS OLD. THERE’S NO PHYSICAL EVIDENCE OF RAPE. NO DNA AT ALL. AND MANY OF THE WOMEN LIED ABOUT THEIR STORIES.  YET HE WAS STILL CONVICTED.  DOES ANYONE ELSE FIND THAT STRANGE?  IS THIS JUSTICE? IS COSBY GUILTY? YOU COME TO YOUR OWN CONSCLUSION.  BUT WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF THESE FAMOUS WHITE MEN ACCUSED OF SEX ALLEGATIONS. CHARLIE SHEEN? MATT LAUER? HARVEY WEINSTEIN? WILL THEY SEE DAY IN COURT?  WILL THEY BE CONVICTED? IT’S HIGHLY UNLIKELY. WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Kanye West Decoded: Sellout Coon or Mind Control victim?

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What the hell is going on with rapper/producer Kanye West? He really has changed.I remember after Hurricane Katrina he said President Bush didn’t care about black people.  He got a lot of props from people  for speaking the truth.  Now he’s walking around with a “Make America Great Again” hat and supporting President Donald Trump.  He has completely turned into a different person.  I know people can evolve and change viewpoints.  This is what happens when people elevate their conscious and receive new information.  But this is a BIG change in my opinion.  On a recent live TMZ interview he said that “slavery was a choice”.  That comment has made West a hot topic all over social media.  What made his transform so drastically?  Is it because the fame and fortune is getting to him?  Does too much white vagina make you lose your mind? maybe just being around the demonic Kardashian family is to much for his mental state.  Some believe he might be under mind control.  I have heard about mind control being in Hollywood for decades. He has mad crazy rants before.  So this is not the first time.  But sometimes he speaks the truth about the industry. Here’s some interesting videos breaking down this crazy Kanye situation.  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Bill Cosby found guilty: When will White sexual deviants pay for their crimes?(Selective Justice)

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Black Panther: The Revolution will never be televised(Spoiler review)

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Black Panther, the most recent entry into the Marvel cinematic universe, has been greeted with the breathless anticipation that its arrival will Change Things. The movie features the leader of a fictional African country who has enough wealth to make Warren Buffet feel like a financial piker and enough technological capacity to rival advanced alien races. The change that the movie supposedly heralds is black empowerment to effectively challenge racist narratives. This is a tall order, especially in the time of Trump, who insists that blacks live in hell and wishes that (black) sons of bitches would get fired for protesting police violence. Which makes it a real shame that Black Panther, a movie unique for its black star power and its many thoughtful portrayals of strong black women, depends on a shocking devaluation of black American men.

To explain my complaint, I need to reveal some key plot turns: spoiler alert.

Wakanda is a fictional nation in Africa, a marvel beyond all marvels. Its stupendous wealth and technological advancement reaches beyond anything the folks in MIT’s labs could dream of. The source of all this wonder is vibranium, a substance miraculous in ways that the movie does not bother to explain. But so far as we understand, it is a potent energy source as well as an unmatched raw material. A meteor rich in vibranium, which crashed ages ago into the land that would become Wakanda, made Wakanda so powerful that the terrors of colonialism and imperialism passed it by. Using technology to hide its good fortune, the country plays the part of a poor, third-world African nation. In reality, it thrives, and its isolationist policies protect it from anti-black racism. The Wakandans understand events in the outside world and know that they are spared. This triumphant lore—the vibranium and the Wakandans’ secret history and superiority—are more than imaginative window-dressing. They go to the heart of the mistaken perception that Black Panther is a movie about black liberation.

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In Black Panther, T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) has risen to the throne of Wakanda. We know that his father, T’Chaka, the previous king, died in a bomb attack. T’Challa worships his father for being wise and good and wants to walk in his footsteps. But a heartbreaking revelation will sorely challenge T’Challa’s idealized image of his father.
The movie’s initial action sequences focus on a criminal partnership between arms dealer Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis) and Eric Killmonger (Michael P. Jordan). They both seek vibranium but for different reasons: Klaue is trying to profit from Wakanda’s wonder-material; Killmonger is trying to make his way to Wakanda to make a bid for the throne. He believes he is the rightful king.
Killmonger, it turns out, is T’Challa’s cousin, orphaned by T’Chaka’s murder of Killmonger’s father and T’Chaka’s younger brother, N’Jobu (Sterling Brown). Why did T’Chaka kill his brother? N’Jobu was found with stolen vibranium. The motive for the theft is where the tale begins—and where the story of black wonderment starts to degrade.
We learn that N’Jobu was sent to the United States as one of Wakanda’s War Dogs, a division of spies that the reclusive nation dispatches to keep tabs on a world it refuses to engage. This is precisely N’Jobu’s problem. In the United States, he learns of the racism black Americans face, including mass incarceration and police brutality. He soon understands that his people have the power to help all black people, and he plots to develop weapons using vibranium to even the odds for black Americans. This is radical stuff; the Black Panthers (the political party, that is) taken to a level of potentially revolutionary efficacy. T’Chaka, however, insists N’Jobu has betrayed the people of Wakanda. He has no intention of helping any black people anywhere; for him and most Wakandans, it is Wakanda First. N’Jobu threatens an aide to T’Chaka, who then kills N’Jobu. The murder leaves Killmonger orphaned. However, Killmonger has learned of Wakanda  from his father, N’Jobu. Living in poverty in Los Angeles, he grows to become a deadly soldier to make good on his father’s radical aim to use Wakanda’s power to liberate black people everywhere, by force if necessary.
By now viewers have two radical imaginings in front of them: an immensely rich and flourishing advanced African nation that is sealed off from white colonialism and supremacy; and a few black Wakandans with a vision of global black solidarity who are determined to use Wakanda’s privilege to emancipate all black people.
These imaginings could be made to reconcile, but the movie’s director and writer (with Joe Cole), Ryan Coogler, makes viewers choose. Killmonger makes his way to Wakanda and challenges T’Challa’s claim to the throne through traditional rites of combat. Killmonger decisively defeats T’Challa and moves to ship weapons globally to start the revolution. In the course of Killmonger’s swift rise to power, however, Coogler muddies his motivation. Killmonger is the revolutionary willing to take what he wants by any means necessary, but he lacks any coherent political philosophy. Rather than the enlightened radical, he comes across as the black thug from Los Angeles hell bent on killing for killing’s sake—indeed, his body is marked with a scar for every kill he has made. The abundant evidence of his efficacy does not establish Killmonger as a hero or villain so much as a receptacle for tropes of inner-city gangsterism.
In the end, all comes down to a contest between T’Challa and Killmonger that can only be read one way: in a world marked by racism, a man of African nobility must fight his own blood relative whose goal is the global liberation of blacks. In a fight that takes a shocking turn, T’Challa lands a fatal blow to Killmonger, lodging a spear in his chest. As the movie uplifts the African noble at the expense of the black American man, every crass principle of modern black respectability politics is upheld.
In 2018, a world home to both the Movement for Black Lives and a president who identifies white supremacists as fine people, we are given a movie about black empowerment where the only redeemed blacks are African nobles. They safeguard virtue and goodness against the threat not of white Americans or Europeans, but a black American man, the most dangerous person in the world.
Even in a comic-book movie, black American men are relegated to the lowest rung of political regard. So low that the sole white leading character in the movie, the CIA operative Everett Ross (Martin Freeman), gets to be a hero who helps save Wakanda. A white man who trades in secrets and deception is given a better turn than a black man whose father was murdered by his own family and who is left by family and nation to languish in poverty. That’s racist.

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Who could hope that this age of black heroes represents thoughtful commentary on U.S. racism rather than the continuation of it? Black Panther is not the first prominent attempt to diversify the cinematic white superheroics and thus not the first to disappoint. After Netflix’s Daredevil affirmed the strong television market for heroes, the media company moved to develop shows for other characters that populate the comic. Jessica Jones, about a white heroine, was a critical success. It handled its tough female protagonist intelligently. That show introduced the character of Luke Cage (Michael Colter), an indestructible black man. When Netflix announced that Cage would have his own show, the anticipation was intense: a bulletproof black man in the age of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown? And he would wear a hoodie and fight police? Instead we got a tepid depiction Harlem poverty, partly the consequence of institutional racism but more closely tied to the greed expressed by two of its big bad black baddies, Black Mariah (Alfre Woodard) and Cottonmouth (Mahershala Ali). But that was not the worst of it. The ultimate evil in the show’s first and only season is Willis Stryker (Eric Laray Harvey), another black man whom Luke Cage must defeat. Stryker is not only a black villain, but Cage’s adopted brother. Cage must beat his brother to a pulp, just as Panther must kill his cousin.

The offenses don’t end, though. If one surveys the Marvel cinematic universe, one finds that the main villains—even those far more destructive than Killmonger—die infrequently. They are formidable enemies who live to challenge the hero again and again. A particularly poignant example is Loki, brother to Thor, the God of Thunder. Across the Thor and Avengers movies that feature him, Loki is single-handedly responsible for incalculable misery and damage; his power play leads to an alien invasion that nearly levels all of Manhattan. Yet Thor cannot seem to manage any more violence against Loki than slapping him around a bit and allowing other heroes to do the same—even as Loki tries to kill Thor. Loki even gets his turn to be a good guy in the recent Thor: Ragnarok. Loki gets multiple, unearned chances to redeem himself no matter what damage he has done. Killmonger, however, will not appear in another movie. He does not get a second chance. His black life did not matter even in a world of flying cars and miracle medicine. Why? Perhaps Killmonger’s main dream to free black people everywhere decisively earns him the fate of death. We know from previous Marvel movies that Killmonger’s desire for revenge is not the necessary condition to eliminate him; Loki’s seeming permanence is proof.

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My claim that Killmonger’s black life does not matter is not hyperbole. In a macabre scene meant to be touching, Black Panther carries Killmonger to a plateau so that he might see the sun set on Wakanda before dying. With a spear stuck in his chest, he fulfills his wish to appreciate the splendor his father described, when Wakanda seemed a fairy tale. T’Challa offers Wakanda’s technology to save Killmonger’s life—it has saved the white CIA agent earlier in the film. But Killmonger recalls his slave heritage and tells Panther he’d rather die than live in bondage. He knows the score. He knows that Panther will incarcerate him (as is disproportionately common for black American men). The silence that follows seems to last an eternity. Here is the chance for the movie to undo its racist sins: T’Challa can be the good person he desires to be. He can understand that Killmonger is in part the product of American racism and T’Chaka’s cruelty. T’Challa can realize that Wakanda has been hoarding resources and come to an understanding with Killmonger that justice may require violence, if as a last resort. After all, what else do comic-book heroes do but dispense justice with their armored fists and laser rifles? Black Panther does not flinch. There is no reconciliation. Killmonger yanks the spear out of his chest and dies. The sun sets on his body as it did on Michael Brown’s.

It is fair to wonder whether the movie merely reflects the racial politics of the comic books that serve as its inspiration. Yes and no. In the movie, Killmonger’s relationship to T’Challa is as the comic-book canon portrays it. Killmonger is a deadly killer in the comics as in the movie, but he is also extremely intelligent, studying at MIT to understand the technology he goes on to deploy. In the movie, Killmonger’s only skill is killing; if Coogler intended to make Killmonger a hood-born genius, he has failed badly.
In the comics, Killmonger also dies at Black Panther’s hands. But KIllmonger dies long after he has come to live in Wakanda, albeit under a veil of deceit, before attempting a coup. The comic thus opens (but ultimately rejects) an opportunity to save Killmonger to fight for another day, just as Loki is repeatedly saved. The movie completely forecloses this possibility, which is odd since we can all be fairly certain that there will be a sequel.

What alternative story-lines might have satisfied?
I couldn’t help think of Ulysses Klaue, a mainline villain in the comics who lives a long, infamous life. He would have been a perfectly good villain to motivate the movie’s attempt at wokeness. In the comics, there is bad blood between the Klaue clan and Wakanda’s royal lineage (Klaue’s Nazi grandfather died by the hands of Chanda, an earlier Wakandan king and Panther). In Klaue, we had a white villain whose bloodline is imbued with the sins of racism. Ramonda, played by the ever-regal Angela Bassett, is temporally misplaced in the movie. In the comics canon, T’Challa takes the mantle of the Panther while Ramonda, T’Challa’s stepmother, is being held captive by a white magistrate in apartheid South Africa. If Coogler had at all been interested in making Panther a symbol of racial reparation he could have easily placed Klaue in South Africa, even post-apartheid, and the rescue of Ramonda—with Klaue in the way—could have driven the narrative. Ramonda is prominent in the movie, but she does not animate the movie’s central drama.  Instead, Black Panther is set on a course to kill off his cousin in his first outing, suggesting yet another racist trope, the fractured black family as a microcosm of the black community’s inability to get it together.

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You will have noticed I have not said much about the movie’s women. They are the film’s brightest spot: the black women of Wakandan descent are uniformly independent, strong, courageous, brilliant, inventive, resourceful, and ethically determined. I take it that a good deal of this is owed to Ta-Nehisi Coates’s success at elevating the series’ women to central characters with influence and power that turns more on their minds and integrity than their bodies. T’Challa’s sister, Shuri (Letitia Wright), is sufficiently brilliant to make the Q character from James Bond films seem a clever child with some interesting ideas, while Nakia (Lupita N’yongo) is the ethical center of the film, thoughtful and lacking any stereotypical hysterics or emotional cloudiness that so many movies use to savage the intellect of leading women. Thus the movie deserves praise for its gender politics—save in relation to the only black American woman. The character, Tilda Johnson, a.k.a. the villain Nightshade, has, by my count, less than fifteen words to say in the movie, and is unceremoniously murdered by Killmonger because Klaue is using her as a shield and Killmonger just ain’t got time for that. The lone American black woman is disposed of by black-on-black violence. She is also invisible and nearly silent. In the comic books her character is both a genius and alive and well.

Black Panther presents itself as the most radical black experience of the year. We are meant to feel emboldened by the images of T’Challa, a black man clad in a powerful combat suit tearing up the bad guys that threaten good people. But the lessons I learned were these: the bad guy is the black American who has rightly identified white supremacy as the reigning threat to black well-being; the bad guy is the one who thinks Wakanda is being selfish in its secret liberation; the bad guy is the one who will no longer stand for patience and moderation—he thinks liberation is many, many decades overdue. And the black hero snuffs him out.

When T’Challa makes his way to Los Angeles at the movie’s end, he gestures at all the buildings he has bought and promises to bring to the distressed youths the preferred solution of mega-rich neoliberals: educational programming. Don’t get me wrong, education is a powerful and liberatory tool, as Paulo Freire taught us, but is that the best we can do? Why not take the case to the United Nations and charge the United States with crimes against humanity, as some nations tried to do in the early moments of the Movement for Black Lives?

Black Panther is not the movie we deserve. My president already despises me. Why should I accept the idea of black American disposability from a man in a suit, whose name is synonymous with radical uplift but whose actions question the very notion that black lives matter?

Article by Christopher Lebron

Martin Luther King Jr.(Forgotten Quotes)

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They say you can tell what a nation stands for by looking at who they see as heroes.  I always think about that when Martin Luther King’s birthday comes around.  Does America truly cherish his ideals?  I don’t really think so. Martin Luther King was a very complex individual.  They say he stood up against injustice and racism…but he had numerous sexual affairs as well.  Can a man be socially moral and still cheat on his wife?  I guess it’s somewhat possible.  But after doing years of research on MLK I found out that he had an idealistic worldview but he wasn’t perfect.  But we all know there are many famous men who cheated on their wives(John F Kennedy,Bill Clinton,Donald Trump).  But this post isn’t about that.  In this post I wanted to put up some quotes that often get overlooked.  King’s views changed from when he made the “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963.  As the Vietnam War waged on and all the racial strife continued…his idealistic views started to diminish over time.  He started to view the racist European society a little bit more realistically. I think Malcolm X understood the European mentality a little better.  But King was getting there before he was killed in 1968. Here’s a nice list of forgotten quotes.  Shout out to Abagond  for pulling up some of thee quotes.

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“The white man does not abide by the law… His police forces are the ultimate mockery of law.”
“There aren’t enough white persons in our country who are willing to cherish democratic principles over privilege.”
“Three hundred years of humiliation, abuse and deprivation cannot be expected to find voice in a whisper.”
“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar.”
“We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality.”
“We must see now that the evils of racism, economic exploitation and militarism are all tied together.”

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society.”
“A riot is the language of the unheard,”
“A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring contrast of poverty and wealth.”
“All of us are on trial in this troubled hour.”
“America is going to hell if we don’t use her vast resources to end poverty and make it possible for all God’s children to have the basic necessities of life.”

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“I am sorry to have to say that the vast majority of white Americans are racists, either consciously or unconsciously.”
“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly.”
“It is cruel jest to tell a bootless man that he ought to lift himself up by his own bootstraps”
“No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.”
“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.”

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Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”
“Poverty is one of the most urgent items on the agenda of modern life.”
“The curse of poverty has no justification in our age. It is socially as cruel and blind as the practice of cannibalism.”
“The evils of capitalism are as real as the evils of militarism and evils of racism.”

Watson Mere(Black Business series)

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When did you get your start with Art?

I have been creating art since I was 2 and never really stopped. Through the years my style has changed multiple times but after my parents purchased a desktop computer when I was in middle school I began to experiment with creating art utilizing Microsoft Paint with a mouse and I’ve been using this technique of creation ever since.

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How would you describe your artistic style?

Since I am of Haitian descent my art is naturally colorful. Big hair and African features are seen in mostly all of my pieces. I also try to purposefully instill some form of content to get the viewers imagination going as to what the image means or says to them.

Where do you draw inspiration for your work?

The African diaspora. I take my inspiration from the love, struggles, happiness and pain of people of African descent. Most of my painting are of Black Women and I try my best to display her in her complete beauty, strength, resilience, passion, pride, and sometimes even vulnerable states. I’m also inspired to create an image of people of color that is usually not depicted within mainstream media.

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What was the first art piece you sold?

The first art piece that I ever sold was to a local musician. The piece was of him playing his trumpet and although I didn’t sell it for much it felt gratifying to know that something that I created from a mere thought in my head was worthy of someone spending their hard earned cash on.

What has been your most notable collections?

One of my most notable pieces would be “Something Beautiful”. The piece depicts the side profile of a black woman the locs smelling lilies. Hanging from the woman’s hair is a Klan’s man. The piece has many meaning but one is that truly being at peace and loving your natural self over powers any form of hate. “care Free” is another notable piece. It shows a black couple walking undismayed through a crowd holding signs. The crowd and the signs are somewhat of a time lapse displaying the oppressive words against people of color including modern versions of these signs shown in the front. This piece holds many meaning as well but one of the main is “Same signs different time.” Even the cruelest of these signs were seen as just and normal during their time of existence.

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https://artofmere.com/