Ama K. Abebrese

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Ama K. Abebrese was born May 3, 1980. She  is an award-winning British Ghanaian actress, television presenter and producer. She was born in Ghana and raised in West London in the United Kingdom. She won the 2011 Best Actress in a Leading Role at the AMAA Awards for her stellar performance in Sinking Sands. Her film credits includes the Netflix movie Beasts of No Nation directed by Cary Fukunaga and stars Idris Elba. She plays the mother to lead young actor Abraham Attah who plays Agu. Abebrese is listed among Africa’s Top 20 Actors and Actresses by FilmContacts.com. She was named among C Hub magazine’s 100 most influential  African Women Influencers’ of the era 2014/15. She was ranked the Number 1 Most Influential TV and Radio Host 2015 on the Ghana Social Media Rankings List.

She is an accomplished television presenter, having started hosting TV shows in her teens on YCTV in London, she has presented on BBC2, OBE TV, Viasat 1, TV3, Ebonylife TV and many more.

Abebrese started her training at YCTV (Youth Culture Television) in London, an organization started by Sabrina Guinness on the TV show Challenge Anneka. She was a presenter on BBC2 youth show Pass da Mic and a guest presenter on the English File educational series. She developed a love for acting after joining the Lyric Theatre (Hammersmith) Summer Company as a youth. Abebrese was a regular TV presenter on the now defunct OBE TV in London, hosting and producing on a number of shows including One Touch, and the entertainment chat show On The Sofa, where guests she has interviewed range from Akon to Ziggy Marley. She has interviewed the likes of Harrison Ford, Ne-Yo, Rihanna, and Star Wars director George Lucas among notable others.

Her film credits include the international multiple award-winning film Sinking Sands, directed by 2011 BAFTA LA and Pan African Film Festival prize winner Leila Djansi. The film received 12 nominations at the 2010 Ghana Movie Awards, including “Best Actress in a Leading Role”, the film won four awards, including “Best Film”. Others film credits are Revele film’s Elmina and London Get Problem. She starred and co-produced the movie Double-Cross, which won two awards for “Best Cinematography” and “Best Hair and Make Up” at the 2015 Ghana Movie Awards.

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She is the former Head of Own Productions at Viasat 1 television station in Ghana.She was the host of A Day in the Life TV show which aired on Viasat 1; she co hosted New Day on TV3 weekday mornings.In 2013, Abebrese alongside Nollywood actress Dakore and comedian Ayo Makun hosted the 2013 edition of the AMAA Awards.

 

Yetide Badiki

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A Nigerian Princess navigating the ins and outs of Hollywood. Born in Nigeria, raised in England, Nigeria and the United States. 

 
A graduate of McGill University in Montreal Canada with a major in English Literature (theater) and a minor in Environmental Science. Recipient of an MFA in theater from Illinois State University and nominated for a Joseph Jefferson Award in Chicago for  the role of Juliette in “I Have Before Me a Remarkable Document Given to Me by a Young Lady from Rwanda.” 
 
The name Yetide means “mother is back,” looking to do that name proud.

A lot of brothers say they like foreign women. Well just keep this in mind…..

Foreign Women..

Kia Kinks

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This stunning beauty is Kia Kinks.  She is a great definition of natural beauty. She is a natural hair vlogger.  She has a YouTube channel and Instagram account.

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Chloe Kitempo

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This beautiful sista is  Chloe Kitempo. She is slaying the game at only 21 years old. Born and raised in Brussels, Belgium with heavy roots in the DR Congo, Africa, she’s taken her popularity from YouTube and is using it to make a business for herself. She is a fashion and beauty vlogger.  She has a YouTube channel and can be found on Twitter and Instagram. Here’s a short interview she gave:

What tips do you have for women looking to grow their personal brand?

Staying true to yourself is major key! People will admire you the most because you are yourself. Be consistent in whatever it is that you’re trying to bring out there. Very important! And last but not least, people like pretty things, keep an on eye on how you’re bringing your stuff to the public.

How has your social media popularity aided in you becoming an entrepreneur?

At first I had no idea social media was actually a business. I was posting my stuff out there just for fun until I started getting business offers. SHOOK! Step by step I learned how to manage the enquiries, I’m still working on it because it’s not easy but I’m getting there.

What made you start a YouTube channel and what is your favorite content to put out?

The real reason I started YouTube was out of boredom (lmao). In 2012, I temporarily moved to this city in Belgium where I had zero friends to hang out with and zero activities to keep me busy. I had this Canon camera and I had a editing software and I said to myself let’s try and make a mini make up tutorial and that’s exactly what I did. I’ve always been a type of creative person so to me editing was actually very entertaining. That video did not pop at all. I waited a long time before uploading more stuff to my channel.

What are some personal and business goals you set for yourself?

I don’t really like to talk about my goals because I feel like it’s something personal. It’s actually awkward to me lol. Is that weird ?

What tips do you have for young women looking to grow their social media following?

Like I said earlier, keep it moving. Be yourself, post eye-catching content and stay consistent! ❤

What was a huge challenge for you to overcome as you grew successfully?

Reacting to negativity was a big challenge! I never understood why people would randomly come under my video/picture to write something mean. Me as a person if I don’t like a post I would ignore it and voilà. Then again, when somebody takes it that far I feel like it tells more about themselves than about the person they’re “bullying”.

What do you want your supporters to take from this interview?

If you’re reading this I want to boost you in whatever it is that you’re doing. Be the best you can be! xoxo

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Menticide: Conversations in Black Self Hatred

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“The controllers of this society have made use of psychological warfare to erode and destroy the will and mind of Black people. This is menticide pure and simple. Once the victims discover the truth, we are forced to change our lives. But, the victim fears change because the victim doesn’t know where that change will take him or her. Indeed we fear the unknown. The victim seeks to deny but denial of this reality is problematic because the victim is reminded everyday. The victim is caught in an internal double bind, damned if they don’t, damned if they do.”- Olomenji, From an essay entitled Mentacide, Genocide and National Vision: The Crossroads for the Blacks of America.

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A few weeks ago I was talking with a friend of mine about self hatred. She told me that she has heard anti-black comments from family and friends.  I  have also heard comments from family as well as co-workers that reek of self hatred.  So I decided I would share some cooments I’ve heard over the last ten years.   I’ve heard some really ignorant comments from black co-workers. These are just a few short conversations I’ve had.

Example #1

I was eating lunch in the break room with  a black male co-worker. There’s no one else in the room but us two.

Co-worker:  Hey man,you ever screw a white girl?

Kushite:  No I haven’t.  I don’t really like them.

Co-worker: What??  That’s crazy man! You got to try a white girl at least once. I get tired of black women. Change it up a bit. It feels good giving  it to these white girls! (laughing)

Kushite:  No I’m good.  They’re not my thing.  I’m more attracted to black women. White girls do nothing for me. But you do what you want.( He just looked at me and shook his head in disbelief)

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Example #2

During a break I was talking with an African(Nigerian) co-worker.  I noticed a magazine on the desk.  As I flip through the magazine I see a picture of actress Lupita Nyongo.

Kushite: Now this is a beautiful woman!  She is truly stunning…don’t you think?

African woman:  Yes she’s kind of cute…not bad.  But you know where there are beautiful woman?  Have you heard of the Hausa tribe?

Kushite:  Yes I believe so.  Aren’t they a tribe in West Africa?

African woman:  Yes they are.  Many of them are so beautiful.  Many are very light skinned with thin lips.

Kushite:  So you’re saying they look white? Come on now!

African woman:  (very defensive)  No No!  Not what I meant.  I just mean they are very beautiful.  Light skinned with pointy noses and thin lips,you know?  That is all I meant.

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Example #3

Two  co-workers (black men) were by a cubicle and talking.  I was a few feet away behind them.  They couldn’t see me. An African woman co-worker walked by them.  She was a very dark skinned woman.

Black man #1- Did you see how dark she was?

Black man #2- Good Lord! She was dark as night! (laughing)

Black man #1- Yeah she was left in the toaster oven too long! That’s too black!(laughing)

Black man #2-  Burnt to a crisp! (both men laughing)

As a side note,Black man #1 has a biracial daughter with a white woman. And is currently dating a Mexican woman.  He doesn’t even look at black women.  Black man #2 as a daughter with a black woman although they have since broken up.  He told me he is currently engaged to a mixed woman.  Mixed with what??  He told me she mixed with white and Mexican.  He even showed me a picture of this below average looking woman.  She looks pretty white to me.  Both of these “men” are pathetic examples of the black race.

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These are just a few examples that come to mind.  Can you name an instance of black self hatred?  Or maybe a comment that someone may have made that sounds anti-black? Something insulting about nappy hair?  Or something degrading about skin color?  I’m sure you’ve heard these comments before.   I’d love to read your examples.