Dedication to all my subscribers: I appreciate the love and support!

I wanted to make a video to show some appreciation to all the people I’ve met in cyberspace.  Like most people I’ve had ups and downs in life.  But even when I was feeling down a lot of you helped uplift my spirits.  And I’ve learned so much from many of you. Many of you have shared information with me that I never knew.  And hopefully I’ve done the same for you. That’s all I ever wanted to do.  I never started blogging to be Mr. Popular. I don’t do this to be some kind of conscious celebrity. I have strong opinions and I’ve actually lost subscribers because of my views. But at least I’m honest about my feelings.  I love my people and I just want them to realize we are in a real war at the moment.  I just try to bring them information that will elevate their consciousness and see through the lies. So this video is long overdue. To all the kind brothers and sisters I’ve chatted with on WordPress,Youtube and Twitter.  I also want to thank all the people who reblogged and shared my posts on Instagram and Facebook.  All your hard work is not going unnoticed. I appreciate all the love.  I just wanted to say thank you!

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Who is an African/Black person?- Black Genetics(Part 1 of 4)

Who is black?  What is an African?  This is a question I have been thinking about the last few years.  Mainly because I have seen many debates on YouTube,Twitter and Facebook on who is a black person.  It’s  a hot topic that just wont seem to go away.  I think the fact that people are debating it must mean many of us are still very confused.  Why is that?  Why is the black collective so confused about our own identity?  The video(above) is really good.  I know for some it might seem offensive.  But you can tell that the speaker has really analyzed this issue.  It’s a very touchy subject that most black people want to run away from.

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This picture(above) shows different African women around the world. And of course there are people of African descent in America,Canada and the United Kingdom.  Some people say many of us are mixed raced people.  Some say we come in different shades because of years of race mixing.  I will address race mixing in part two of this series.  I personally don’t think race mixing is good for the black collective.  It seems to cause more confusion more than anything else. But I guess the real question is how is a black person defined? What do Africans look like?  How are Africans classified?

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Fellow blogger C.C. Saunders stated this about blackness:

“Blackness is not limited to a skin color, but it is a state of being, an incomparable experience prompted by skin color, facial features, body type and hair texture. Omitting any identifying attribute allots a significant privilege absent from the lifetime of any black person possessing these attributes in entirety. However, melanin, while a chief component of blackness, does not encompass the totality of blackness. To distinguish between black and melanated is essential to understanding blackness as a collective identity.”

Blogger Amos Magazine said this about African people:

“Prior to the enslavement of West and Central Africans, Africans had certain traits and certain biological markers that made them a separate distinct group. Africans prior to 1500 and prior to the infamous fictitious Willie Lynch Letter had traitsAfricans prior to the invasion of Arabs, Berbers and other West Asian people had skin color from brown to dark brown. This is an African trait. Africans had one common hair texture. Yes, Europeans upon arriving  in what today is called Rwanda did notice that many Africans were a lighter shade of Brown from other Africans. But they were not yellow or near white. They were simply a pecan brown color as compared to the dark chocolate color of the other group. They used these slight differences in order to pit one group against on another. Today, DNA* test (* because there are holes in this science) show that the Hutu and Tutsi were actually the same people and that Hutu and Tutsi were actually social status. Now Negros will use to in order to say mulattoes are Africans. ***(3star concepts mean this is something to pay special attention to) ***The Tutsi who were divided into people of a lighter hue of brown were not products of mixed raced sexual relationships. My opponents will purposely leave this out in order to compare a mulatto vs. an authentic African or an authentic disasporic Africans.”

Blogger Bhekizitha breaks it down from a biological standpoint:

“An African / Black person is clearly visually a “close” descendant of people from East Africa, a region comprised of countries now known as Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Their color variation ranges from bronze, dark reddish-brown, dark or nut brown, dark-chocolate color plus “peppercorn” hair.”

This video(above) is very interesting.  I first saw this video about four years ago.  It’s the author Supreme Understanding. He has authored books such as How to Hustle and Win,Knowledge of Self and Black God.  I’ve read a few of his books.  I must admit that he knows quite a bit about black history and African culture.  But he’s not African…he’s an Indian man.  Years ago I remember seeing him in a picture with his black wife.  In this video he says that being black is color,culture and consciousness. So he’s saying it’s not just physical traits that make you black.  So if a Mexican,Indian or Asian man listens to rap music,studies African culture and has a black wife…..that makes him black? So it’s just about having a black consciousness? This can create a problem in the long run.

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This picture(above) is from Supreme Understanding’s website.  It’s titled What is Black? Looking at the pictures you can see all these dark skinned people from India,China,Pacific Islands,Malaysia and Australia. But are these people really Africans? Or do they have racial admixture? Were the original inhabitants of Australia or India really Africans? And if so,what does it mean for black people today?  I think black people really like to be all inclusive.  We like hearing that our ancestors were all over the world and created civilizations.  That’s very true to a large extent.  And to many of us we have a dream of creating some type of racial utopia.  A world in which all people who have some melanin are brothers and sisters.  But this is not reality.  There will always be racial and cultural divisions.   Just because you have dark skinned people in India and Malaysia doesn’t mean they can relate to a black person in America.  The culture of a dark skinned Aborigine in Australia is totally different than a black person living in Jamaica.  I always promote black unity,black love and black power on this blog.  But you can’t have any type of unity if you can’t even decide who is black and who is not black.  How can you have any type of cohesiveness when there are no clear cut definitions on your identity? And this is why the video by Supreme is problematic.  He believes that all “people of color” are fighting against a white power structure. Therefore we are all in this fight together.  But my thinking is that why can’t we fight a racist society and still maintain our own unique racial identity. Why does everyone with a little bit of color have to be considered black?  By making everyone black…no one is really black.  Our unique blackness gets lost in the process.  Chinese people don’t have this problem.  They don’t accept just anyone who might have their physical traits.  I’ve seen Hispanics with a yellowish skin tone but they are not seen as Chinese.  I’ve seen people that were biracial(Black/Chinese) with slanted eyes.  But just because they had slanted eyes,Chinese people still don’t see them as one of them. By doing this it helps them stay homogeneous.  They are able to maintain their racial identity.  And this is something black/African people must keep in mind when want to distinguish ourselves from other groups.  By letting anyone claim “blackness” it devalues those that are black in the process.

2017 Women’s March: Black Female Perspective

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Following Trump’s inauguration a series of Women’s Marches occurred throughout North America. The protests erupted to preserve the female liberties seemingly threatened by a “conservative” president who boasted of sexually assaulting women. As a female, I empathize and even support the initiatives that foment this March. However, although a woman, I know that I am inevitably black first. Thus, I can’t help but feel that by supporting the women’s march is to support the very means of my oppression.

On my a tri-weekly journey to a previous job, I recall seeing a number of protestors outside of Planned Parenthood at the wee hours of the morning seeking to shame female patrons. One protestor stood out from the others—an elderly white man surely north of seventy-five. He stood hunched over, holding an oaktag with a message written in ballpoint pen. I did not bother to read the poster, but judging by the stoic expression on his face, he was there to cast the stones of white male privilege onto the female body. Standing at the intersectionality of race and gender, the black woman knows this gaze all to well. While the literal gaze casts itself onto the black female body countless places throughout North America, the figurative gaze consumes black femininity in its entirety. The women’s march solely speaks to the “woman” component of this gaze, eliminating the most defining characteristic of black female identity.

Reproductive rights in general proves controversial to  the black female trajectory. A quick glance at history reveals that the black female endured sheer deprivation in terms of reproductive rights—her body used as means for mayoral economic franchisement. White women too encompassed an existence that also regarded them as property, however their fair skin warranted privileges denied to the black female body. These exclusive liberties afforded to white women illustrate the concept of “woman” as a privilege solely applicable to non-male whites. Consider the phrasing “black” woman. The label “Black woman” illustrates that black female intersectionality separates black females from the term’s initial meaning. For any “woman” of another marginalized faction, their race or ethnicity always precedes the term woman—proving their genitals deem them female but their race and ethnicity is first and foremost. Femininity is also a privilege extended exclusively to non-male whites. This exclusivity persists as the black female body only earns femininity when adopting western aesthetics and behavior.

Given the exclusivity of the term “woman,” I find it quite disturbing that white women ( and other oppressed groups) call on the black women for support in their times of distress, yet alienate the black female body when their children, brothers and fathers lay slain on the streets or untagged in the morgue. How many white women “said her name” after Sandra Bland was murdered? How many white women were overtly outraged after the Trayvon Martin verdict was rendered?

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To take a trip down memory lane, how many white female feminists supported Tawana Brawley in her 1988 trial? If autonomy over the female body is right every woman deserves- why was their no feminist congregation when this young, black girl was sexually assaulted by a number of white men? The answer is simple.  Issues that engage both blackness and femininity become “black” issues instantaneously. This fact reveals that feminism is simply not built to encompass intersectional identities and thereby is not equipped to extinguish black female disenfranchisement.

It seems that former President Barack Obama’s victory disgruntled feminists, who supported this victory as long as it was a symbol of the feminist victory to follow.  It seems feminists felt that history would repeat itself. Namely, black male voting privilege preceded white female voting liberties.  Thus, feminists deemed Clinton’s victory inevitable following Obama’s 2008 victory. Dr. Angela Davis expressed a similar sentiment in the following excerpt from her book Women, Race and Class,

“The representative women of the nation have done their uttermost for the last thirty years to secure freedom for the negro; and as long as he was lowest in the scale of being, we were willing to press his claims, but now, as the celestial gate to civil rights is sIowly moving on its hinges, it becomes a serious question whether we had better stand aside and see ‘Sambo’ walk into the kingdom first.” (Davis 70)

Now that it seems that the black collective has something that the white female collective does not, the bells of white privilege right loudly under the veil of feminism.

Feminism functions to afford white women the same liberties as white men. The main component of these liberties is racism—deeming black female participation in any feminist activity injurious. Thus, to participate in a woman’s march as a black woman is to   march along to the stagnant beat of white supremacy. For the black woman is a queen, but to the western world she will never truly be  a woman.

Article written by C.C. Saunders