Halos and Horns- Paul Ifayomi Grant

Angel1...jpg
I have been thinking about how to conceptualise an idea that I think most of you will be aware of, either consciously or subconsciously, but which I sense that a large proportion of the younger generations have not grasped. Now, I should make it clear that I think this lack of awareness is not the fault of the under 30s but is attributable to my generation’s failure to adequately teach them about how racism works, as well as the very skilled way in which Europeans continuously adapt and refine the way they express and operationalise the ideology of white supremacy.

I have previously written about why the idea of ‘Black Firsts’ seems to be so important to Afrikan people and long ago came to conclusion that it is because of the heartfelt, deepseated, aching desire of so many Afrikans to be/feel accepted by Europeans as their ‘equals’. The underlying thinking is that each ‘Black First’ proves to Europeans that we are capable of performing some task; or performing in some arena of life, as competently as Europeans and hence they should abandon their ideology of racial superiority. Of course this theory has been tested to destruction and proven to be utterly without merit, as the ultimate Black First, the election (twice) of Barack Obama proved.

The reason that Black Firsts don’t change they way Afrikans are viewed, no matter how talented the ‘Firstee’ is; or how conspicous their achievement, is because it is an idea that runs completely counter to the fundamental nature of racism.  Racism is an irrational philosophy/ideology/religion, hence its operation is not impacted by evidence or rational arguments. Paradoxically, as well as being irrational racism is also  rational in the sense that it is instrumental, which is to say that it helps Europeans to achieve their primary group goal; which is to exercise power and domination over groups they classify as nonwhite.  Put these two things together and you can understand why Black Firsts never stood a chance as a tactic or strategy to defeat racism.

Angel2...
The above image, from an infamous Benetton advert, almost perfectly depicts the idea I am seeking to convey.
The easiest way to conceptualise halos and horns is to understand that viewed through the lens of the religion/philosophy/ideology called white supremacy; every Afrikan child is metaphorically born with a pair of horns and every European child is born with a halo above their head. In other words all Afrikans are born guilty until proven innocent and all Europeans are born innocent until proven guilty. The practical ramifications of this are that an Afrikan can make one slip in an otherwise blameless life and be condemned to unforgiveable, irredeemable guilt, whereas as European can live a life of exploitative abuse, and except in the most extreme cases, always have the possibility of redemption.

What this means is that the positive things you do can only help yourself whilst the negative things you do will damage other Afrikans. That is to say that your positive deeds and achievements are never generalised to the wider group by Europeans – except in areas of stereotypical Afrikan achievement such as sport and music – however your negative deeds or failures can be; and are, attributed to being part of a group that is designated as inferior.

I will illustrate the above with a real life story. I have changed some of the details to protect people’s identities.
Once upon a time there was an intelligent young Afrikan woman named Adeola who wanted to be a solicitor. She grew up in humble financial circumstances and went to a very poor school, however she overcame these barriers as well as the ubiquitous racism and graduated well from University. She then had the task of securing a contract with a firm of solicitors to undertake her articles and after a relatively short period she was successful in this task. As was her wont she worked hard and qualified as a solicitor. She had been made aware by her boss that she was the first Afrikan trainee solicitor that the firm had ever recruited and thus felt a bit of added pressure in the sense that she did not want to ‘let the side down’. Anyway her boss was very pleased with her performance and two years after she was recruited, and just as she was qualifying, the firm recruited Femi, another hard working young Afrikan. Adeola gave Femi the ‘don’t let the side down’ pep talk and sure enough Femi prospered and qualified without any hiccups. Adeola’s line manager was pleased with both her and Femi and the following year recruited Tunde, who was not quite so focused and methodical as his predecessors. Tunde was not terrible but he was definitely not good and one day, after he had made a bit of a cock up, Adeola’s line manager turned to her in exasperation and said “If I had recruited Tunde first I would never have recruited another black trainee solicitor”. She thought it was a compliment to Adeola, however Adeola had an epiphany; and started to understand the subtleties of how racism works. She saw that whilst the halo is not transferable the horns definitely are!

The above story took place some years ago and of course in 2017 no white manager would be as honest as the manager in the above scenario. However just because someone does not say something does not mean they are not thinking it or acting upon it.

The moral of this story; and this article, is that our achievements should be motivated by the desire to help ourselves, our families and our community. Trying to get Europeans, as  a collective, to respect our humanity, intelligence etc. is a waste of time and psychological energy. The first respect is self-respect as an Afrikan and the ironic thing is that even those people who don’t like you will respect you if you have commitment and integrity. Remember, people can like you without respecting you whilst they can respect you without liking you and the latter is always preferable to the former, although in an ideal world most of us would choose to be both liked and respected. These are the things we need to teach our young people to prepare them for an anti-Afrikan world.

Article by Paul Ifayomi Grant

Why I will not be seeing Wonder Woman

Black Wonder Woman....jpg

I almost did it. I selected a theatre and even looked up showtimes. As I began to mentally assemble my outfit and rework my schedule to accommodate viewing the film, I realized that I was all too familiar with this story.

Wonder Woman is yet another page in the consistent white female narrative designed to portray white beauty intertwined with an earthly anglicism. I need not see this film to know that it will portray the white Woman as the catalyst for all things good in a “bad” world.

Contrary to the ideally nurtured in the western world, the bad is seldom blatant. Both the individual and the collective have a fair chance at combatting that which they can see. The true “bad” in the world lies in Wonder Woman-like figures, whose embedded message seeks to uplift through depicting the very exclusivity that dominates the western hemisphere.

Wonder Women debuts in a climate that veils this exclusivity with the implication of “change.” Seemingly every film and television series has adopted the feminist agenda, avidly if not aggressively, feeding this fictive utopia to the masses. The film exists to promote feminism as the cure to all worldly evils, omitting of course that feminism is a worldly evil. Clad in a form-fitting costume with long and silky dark hair, Wonder Woman encompasses the conventional sexiness of a blonde with the rarity of a red head to project feminism as the height of femininity. Wonder Woman is a dark haired, dark- eyed white Woman–the pseudo “every woman” in seeming to encompass lightness and darkness simultaneously. What the casual gaze may fail to see, is that Wonder Woman resembles her target audience, and encompasses all her acquired audience wishes to become.  Her dark hair provides a strategic contrast to her fair skin, painting the “Wonder” of wonder woman as encompassing the figurative light to societal conflict or darkness.

The wonder in Wonder Woman is that she embodies the antidote to all the world’s problems. She’s Helen of Troy mixed with Hilary Clinton–a savior to white women but a mortal enemy to the woman of a darker hue.

Cinderella.....

Western childhood functions similar to this film, painting the white Woman as Wonder Woman in far less attractive variants. From the abundant white female school teachers, to the tooth fairy, Mrs. Claus, every princess from Cinderella to Snow White, the white female body is a consistent figure of humanity to the western gaze.  These figures function to embed into the black female psyche what “Superman” and “Batman” seek to implement into the general western psyche–that if you are white, anything is possible.

But as the young girl who reads these stories, attends these schools and watches these figures on television grows up, the fantasy of Wonder Woman vanishes into reality.  Instead the harsh world eventually prompts the once naive black body to wonder what was ever wonderful about these pristine figures of their childhood. Although portrayed as the hero in fictive and real scenarios, the white woman is gradually unveiled as an inevitable villain to the black female body.

So, as a black woman, I know this film functions as erasure. I know this film functions to seduce me into a amnesiac state where I falsely separate white female action and intention from white male supremacists. From the white women who chase our black men than scream rape when it goes sour, or objectify our wealthy black men as cash registers, or reduce the quotidian black man to his genitals, to the white women who abrasively target black women at work, back to the very white women who tormented the black female slaves—this movie functions to force the black psyche to accept a white hero, despite centuries of white female villainy.

White heroes, whether male, female, trans, or what have you, are never capable of saving anyone but themselves. For healing is incompatible to the autocrat, who decorates their lives with the blood of the oppressed.

Wonder Woman

Therefore, the true wonder woman will never occupy a leading role in mainstream film. She probably will never make six figures and is unlikely to rouse a shallow gaze on the street.

The true wonder woman has probably yet to arrive home from her twelve-hour work-day, her twenty-four hour job as a mother, or full- time victim of white supremacy. The true Wonder Woman sleeps at night with a six-figure debt heavy on her conscious from daring to dream outside of the confines of systemic oppression. She walks through a neighborhood of businesses owned by any and everyone but those who look like her. She faces ridicule for her skin tone, her nose, and curvy body and faces countless queries if her beauty or attributes are deemed outside the scope of blackness.  The true wonder woman is literally and figuratively raped, never respected, or rewarded. She is frozen in time, pieces of her flesh still floating throughout the Atlantic Ocean, or concealed in an unmarked grave beneath a skyscraper. She is dismembered by a system who uses her limbs to assemble their privilege and writes their laws in her blood.

She is the unspoken gospel of this poached land—the original statue of liberty—the feminine mold to which every race, ethnicity, and creed stealthy covets.

The Wonder Woman film exists to place the “wonder” into the woman concept. As a being excluded from this concept, I replace wonder with “black.” For the black woman does not need wonder, she is wonder. Furthermore, members of the black female collective need not go to the movies to view this fictive wonder woman—they must simply look in the mirror.

Article by CC Saunders

N*ggerizing the Contemporary Black Body,Bill Maher uses the N word

Bill Maher1...

It happened for the first time when I was seventeen.

I was interning for a local politician in Fresh Meadows, Queens. The environment was a predominately white office perched in an affluent neighborhood. My parents were over-protective and would not let me go onto the street and hand out literature, so most of my time was spent handling office duties—and as I would learn, engaging office politics.

One day while inserting data, a young white man rehashed an event that happened at Howard Beach. Rather than give an overview of the event, he decided to recite a racially charged graffiti act verbatim. The epithet read “f*ck all you n*ggers.” After reciting these words, he looked straight into my face, seemingly searching for something that I refused to acknowledge by returning his piercing gaze.

A similar event would occur years later in an interaction with a racial psychopath I mistook for a friend. Similar to my first experience, my pseudo friend expressed outrage in the use of a racial epithet, yet took it upon herself to repeat her uncle’s use of the word n*gger.  Like the previous incident, she too stared in my face as she uttered the term, a gaze I saw in my peripheral because I had refused her longing gaze. This same friend would go on to show me her white boyfriend dressed in blackface for Halloween. We have since lost touch, her face dissipated into a grudging appreciation for presenting a necessary evil to awaken my consciousness.

These particular incidents illustrate the antiracist efforts implemented by whites uncomfortable with black presence, working to transfer their discomfort onto the oppressed black body. This transfer is never painless. Rather it reflects the evil deemed necessary to maintain a fictive whiteness. The black body has historically been used a canvass for western anxiety, making the n word a common painting drawn on the black body to appease the demands of a white supremacist hierarchy.

Despite having the opposite effect, these incidents overtly functioned to distance the individual white body from their racist collective– an impossible, and disingenuous feat given the racial climate that defines America. It is this racial climate that predisposes any antiracist effort to inevitably help not hinder white supremacy.

Flash forward to this past semester. The setting is a writing course at a private university in New York City. To introduce a unit on critical queries I play Jadakiss’s “Why?” I am sure to play the clean version because as a black female on a journey to conscious, I have no place for expletives in my life let alone my classroom. Yet despite my efforts, when prompted to respond to a question in the song, a white female student stated “Why N*ggas can’t get no job?” despite the version played in class that stated “Why brothers can’t get no job?”

To which I responded “what did you say?”
She then proceeded to repeat the sentence and epithet. Every student in the class looked down. But, the worst is yet to come. When confronted about her word use she became combative and argumentative. This is the issue with the n word.

Is it an issue that white people use the n word? Yes. But this is not racism. It seems an essential component of oppression to preoccupy the oppressed with branches of racism and not the roots. Take for example the often unpleasant white and foreign businessmen that dominate black communities throughout America. Is it a problem that they are often unpleasant? Yes. Is this racist? No.

It is racist that the white and non-black foreigner monopolizes black economy—taking our money out of our communities. It is racist that the American system is designed to prevent black business ownership. Racism is the systemic action and language seen in the Constitution and Declaration of Independence. It is the societal hierarchy white people observe in every aspect of western culture. Using the n word is yet another means for white people to assume their acquired hierarchy over black bodies. This student used the n word in the classroom of a black female instructor and fought for the right to use a racially offensive term–that’s racism. Bill Maher illustrated a similar dynamic in his use of the n-word Friday evening.

Bill Maher welcomed guest Senator Ben Sasse on his HBO show “Real Time” in which the pair joked about the fields of Nebraska. When invited to “work the fields” by Sasse, Maher responded “I’m a house n*gger” to a reserved laughter from his audience, to which he expressed his gratitude.

Was Maher wrong for using the n word? Yes. But this was far from the first racist comment Maher has made and won’t be the last. It seems his sexual fetish for black Women serves as a means to validate his racial insensitivity to those foolish enough to believe that having sex with blacks makes forgives their racist tendencies. The very house slaves that he references were both products and victims of the white slave masters, and it is this ignored context that composes the core issue here.

The historical trajectory of black bodies in this country is not funny. The means for initial western wealth, who received cyclical disenfranchisement in exchange for centuries of labor, is hardly a laughing matter, at least for those robbed. In using the n word, the white person induces a collective amnesia that when retrieved portrays the retriever as “living in the past” or “playing the race card.”

Blacks have yet to receive reparations or even inclusion into canonical history for providing the greatest sacrifice for this country, so it seems a fractional effort for the western world to retire an epithet used to verbally subjugate the black body.

So why can’t the word be laid to rest?

The answer is simple, it bears too much power.

Many will say that “n*gger” is “just a word” and blacks put “too much emphasis” on this word. But it was never blacks who put too much emphasis on a term foreign to their indigenous tongue. This was never our word, rather the word is conjured from white creation solely to conceptualize black denigration. Yes, it’s an issue that blacks use the word. But until the black collective maintains power in economics, media, employment and housing , they lack the ability to be racist. Furthermore, it is not the black collective who have issues getting over themselves, it is the white collective that expresses difficulty “getting over” their fictive placement on a stolen land.

The abducted African remains the foundation for western wealth, and their significance much like the emaciated and overworked bodies have dissolved into the stolen American soil. Yet instead of sprouting seeds of progress, this soil breeds a continued oppression of black bodies. This oppression is perhaps most evident in the western words implication that colloquial or comedic use of the term “n*gger” symbolizes racial progress.

Thus, in waiting for the term’s retirement, the black collective anticipates the impossible–for the white world to take a small step to relinquish their systemic power. The term was implemented as a means to maintain a position above the black body, and whites continue to use the term publicly for the same reasons. Maher, could have easily, and I’m sure he and the majority of whites do, used the n word off camera. The decision to do so publicly was because he could. Similarly, in my provided examples, each white individual used this racial epithet in a public place, drunk off a systemic white power that conceives every public space as subject to white domination.

The sadistic white mind— historically inebriated off power—assumes the height of racial psychopathy in staring into the black collective and calling them what every stolen opportunity, every stolen dollar, and every drowned, whipped, lynched, burned and raped ancestor symbolizes in past and present America.

Interestingly, this gaze into the black eye, is a central component of my two earlier examples. Notably, both acts seemed centered on not just saying the word to a black person, but staring them in the eye as they did so. I align said behavior with the traditional racial psychopath who looked blacks in the eye as they raped them, who looked as black flesh was chewed by dogs, who watched the life leave a black body during public lynchings. Namely, my mind thinks of the late Claude Neal and the white eyes that watched his flesh be torn from his body and jammed down his throat in a torture murder that lasted several hours. Let us not forget the white gazes that purchased the mutilated portraits of black bodies, and those who purchased black limbs ripped from their bodies in mob attacks.

White desire to induce and see pain illustrates white assemblage as contingent on black dismemberment—substantiating the white collective as what Dr. Bobby Wright labeled a racial psychopath who performs evil with no conscious.

Maher does a similar act in staring down the contemporary pain of the black collective, and mocking the very institution that proved a platform for his lucrative whiteness and conventional success. His ability to stare into the collective gaze of the black collective and use a term that  jests the narrative of the abducted African violates the black body in the same manner as a lynching or rape.

Using the n-word is a socially accepted means to verbally assault the black body. The word does not function with the simplicity of an article, or the certainty of a noun. For the “n*gger” is no person, place or thing, it is an action. In a 2007 essay for The Atlantic entitle N*ggerization, Cornel West defines “n*ggerization” as the following:

N*ggerization is neither simply the dishonoring and devaluing of black people nor solely the economic exploitation and political disenfranchisement of them. It is also the wholesale attempt to impede democratization—to turn potential citizens into intimidated, fearful, and helpless subjects.

To use the word “nIgger” is an attempt to “n*ggerize,” to subject the black body to a verbal bludgeoning that ties the contemporary black body to a tree beside the ghosts of their ancestors, bare-backed and anticipating the physical wrath of white supremacy designed to force the black mind to mentally acquiesce to inferiority.

Therefore, it goes without saying that Maher’s apology is as insufficient as it is insincere. It also goes without saying that Maher should lose his job. Although it is doubtful that he was every deserving of such visibility anyhow.  Nevertheless, whether fired or not, Maher’s fate will not stop racism. Who knows, Maher may have a clause in his contract that promises a huge payout if fired. He is also at the end of his career, and in addition to being a white man in America, it is guaranteed that Maher will not suffer, because earth is not hell for whites. Thus, it is not his job that the conscious community desires Maher to lose, it is his privilege.

Will the heat of hell change the setting? No, just as firing Maher will not end black suffering. If Maher does get fired the firing will function to imply that the world has “come a long way,” despite occurring in a world where Bill O’Reilly can get fired for “sexual misconduct” but cops are not fired for murdering black men, women or children.

It will also serve as the foregrounds for firing blacks who saying things like “white people,” “pass the crackers” or even “white privilege.” As an oppressed group, we must be sure not to misconstrue what appears to be an opportunity for progress for what it is—an opportunity. Nothing in America has been said or done for the sole purpose of helping blacks, and America proceeds cyclically not linear.

Welfare, affirmative action, diversity initiatives, financial aid, etc all function to aid whites, despite seeming to provide opportunities to the disenfranchised. Moreover, in accordance with the historical trajectory of a country established on the spilled blood of those labeled “other,” the white world will find a way to turn n-word, a source of collective black pain, into a gain for whites.

Article by CC Saunders

Lisa Bonet & Biracial Women-Black Genetics(Part 4 of 4)

ca. 1988 --- Lisa Bonet --- Image by © Lance Staedler/CORBIS OUTLINE

The first time I saw actress Lisa Bonet was on The Cosby Show.  The main stars on the show were Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad.  The other daughters were played by actresses Tempestt Bledsoe,Keisha  Knight Pulliam and Sabrina Le Beauf. But Lisa was clearly the most popular daughter. Lisa  played Denise  Huxtable.The show came on back in 1984.  I remember a lot of black boys in my neighborhood had a crush on her.  I wont lie,I thought she was pretty too.  I remember a classmate telling me that she was biracial and had a Jewish mother.  I did think it was a bit strange that she looked biracial but had two black parents.   I remember on the Cosby Show there were all different shades of black people.  I also remember she did a spinoff show called A Different World.

jasmine-guy

I remember that the character Dwayne Wayne,played by Kadeem Hardison had a huge crush on Denise Huxtable.  Eventually Lisa Bonet left the show to start a film career.  After she left Dwayne fell in love with Whitley Gilbert played by Jasmine Guy(pictured above).  The thing I noticed about these women is they are both biracial.  Why is the mixed woman the object of affection so often? I didn’t think about it much as a child.  But I started to think about it more as I got older. This is something that has been going on for quite some time.  I’ve covered this subject before and it needs repeating.  It’s not really about just Lisa Bonet. She’s just one of the first examples I remember where the mixed woman gets all the attention.  I’ve seen this pattern over thirty years.  And it’s steadily increasing.  But it’s mostly about the fact that Hollywood still uses biracial women has the standard for beautiful black women.  And also we as black people have a problem liking any group of people that look “less black”. This is a learned behavior. I’ve seen it in film,music and television. It’s really nothing new. I’ve seen it throughout my whole childhood.   You may find some of these women attractive.  But the issue is not their attractiveness. The issue is the over abundance of mixed women being in the forefront representing black beauty. There’s so many I could never list them all.  But here’s just a small sample of  some of the more popular ones.  And even some biracial women you may not be that familiar with.

sade

Long before Mariah Carey or Alicia Keys….Sade was the biracial songbird that took the music world by storm.  She was  a huge star in the 80’s.  I admit I like her music.  She really has a lovely voice.  I remember guys in my neighborhood would always say she was so beautiful. Her being biracial probably didn’t hurt too much either. They said she was wife material.  It’s funny because rarely did I hear them say that about Anita Baker,Patti LaBelle or Jody Watley very much.

rae-dawn-chong

In the 80’s biracial actress Rae Dawn Chong was the “black” actress in many Hollywood films.  Although she was mostly paired with white men.

jennifer-beals

Actress Jennifer Beals became a huge star when starred in the film Flashdance(1983).  She played an exotic dancer in the film.  Her mother is white and father is a black man.

vanity

In the action film Action Jackson(1988) the late pop singer Vanity played the love interest to Carl Weathers.  The biracial singer whose real name was Denise Matthews also dated pop/rock  icon Prince.

karyn-parsons

On the sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air(1990-1996)  biracial actress Karyn Parsons played Hilary Banks.  She played the cousin of Will Smith.

MSDJUFE EC012

In the interracial drama Jungle Fever(1991) biracial actress Lonette McKee played the wife of Wesley Snipes.  He cheated on his biracial wife for an Italian woman.  I guess his wife wasn’t white enough for him.

mo-money

In the film Mo Money(1992)  Damon Wayans starred with biracial actress Stacey Dash.

halle-berry

In Boomerang(1992) Eddie Murphy was paired with biracial actress Halle Berry.  Robin Givens was also in the film but Halle was the women every guy wanted. Of course Halle was the go-to mulatto throughout the nineties. And even won an Oscar award in the process.  She became the “pretty black woman” in Hollywood.

mariah-carey

Sade ruled the 80’s but in the 90’s Mariah Carey became the mulatto singer the media feel in love with.  I remember on music channels they would say she was a beautiful black woman. Mariah used to always insist that she was biracial though. Lately she has been getting more in touch with her black side.  Maybe it was because she married black actor/rapper Nick Cannon.  They have since divorced after having two children.

sister-sister

The sitcom Sister Sister(1994-1999) was a big hit among teenage girls.  It starred biracial sisters Tia and Tamera Mowry.

mya

R&B pop singer/dancer Mya was biracial as well.  She first came on the scene back in 1998. She did a little acting in a few films.  Some thought she would be the next Janet Jackson.  I haven’t heard much from her lately.  Not sure what she’s been up to.

kristen-wilson

In the 90’s biracial actress Kristen Wilson was paired with black actors like Eddie Murphy and Damon Wayans.

Gloria Reuben....

Biracial actress Gloria Reuben was on the hit drama ER(1994-2009)  Her character always had troubling finding love.

Michael Michele.....

I also remember actress Michael Michele(above) was  on the drama ER the same time as Gloria Reuben.  She was a nice addition since there wasn’t much “color” on that show.  Of course she’s biracial as well.

carmen-ejogo

What’s the Worst That could Happen(2001) Starred Martin Lawrence and biracial actress Carmen Ejogo.  She usually plays a black woman or a racially ambiguous role.

This is a great video(above) by Youtuber Chrissie.  She perfectly explains the double standard when it comes to biracial beauty.  There’s  a lot of dishonesty when people talk about colorism and the advantage of being biracial.

kandyse-mcclure

Biracial actress Kandyse McClure is from South Africa.  She has starred in films like Children of the Corn and Broken Kingdom.  She’s most known for the sci-fi television show Battlestar Galactica(2004-2009).

Amerie...

R&B singer Amerie debuted in 2002. There was a lot of buzz about her in the beginning.  Her “exotic looks” come from her black father and Korean mother.  Her only hit single was “One Thing”.  Some thought she would dethrone Beyoncé as the next big thing.  Didn’t quite happen though.

Cassie

R&B/pop singer Cassie Ventura(knows as Cassie) on the scene in 2006.  Her father is Filipino and mother is  black/Mexican.  She has done some acting as well.  She obviously wants to be a bigger star. Although she is most known for dating music producer Puff Daddy. She has been his on/off again side piece for the last few years.

In the black drama ATL(2006) biracial actress Lauren London was the love interest to rapper/actor T.I. This film was supposed to make London the role model for all the  biracial ghetto hood chicks.  I guess she’s living up to it.  She already has two children by two gangster rappers.  One with Lil Wayne and Nipsey Hussle.

paula-patton

In the film Idlewild(2006) biracial actress Paula Patton played the love interest to rapper/actor Andre Benjamin.  Over the years she has starred alongside Denzel Washington and Tom Cruise. At one point she was dubbed the “next Halle Berry”.

thandie-newton

In the comedy film Norbit(2007) biracial actress Thandie Newton was paired with Eddie Murphy.  Norbit was a horrible film.  A total waste of film!

Leona Lewis....

I remember when pop singer Leona Lewis dropped her debut cd Spirit in 2007. The British born singer has a black father and white mother.  She made a big splash in her debut.  She has the light skin,light eyes and long hair….and could actually sing. It’s no wonder music critics called her the “new Mariah”.

noemie-lenoir

In the comedy action film Rush Hour 3(2007) mixed-raced actress Noemie Lenoir was the love interest for Chris Tucker.

jordin-sparks

Singer Jordin Sparks won the show American Idol back in 2007.  The biracial singer was seventeen at the time.  I think that show is rigged anyway…I’m just saying.  She has become quite a big star over the last several years.

tracee-ellis-ross

Biracial actress Tracee Ellis Ross stars on the silly sitcom show Black-ish(2014-).  She plays the wife of Anthony Anderson.  Her mother is music icon Diana Ross.  Her father is a Jewish businessman.

CULT

On the Fox show Gotham(2014-)  biracial actress Jessica Lucas plays Tabitha Galavan. She is not only a vicious villain buy also plays a lesbian.  You know Hollywood always has to throw in that sexual confusion.

Sage Steele....

There are even more biracial women in news media as well.  This picture(above) is ESPN sports reporter Sage Steele with her white husband.  Steele is most known for being a white racist apologist. She never misses an opportunity to insult black people and the black struggle. Does that make her a mulatto coon?

Soledad OBrien....

This is biracial news anchor Soledad O’Brien.  She’s a news anchor on CNN. Just like Sage Steele she also married a white man. Look at those children. You can see the African features are just about gone!  Kiss those black genes goodbye!  But I guess that’s purpose of marrying white anyway.

Melissa Harris Perry...

This picture(above) is of biracial news anchor Melissa Harris-Perry.  She is pictured with her mother and father.  She is an author and political commentator. She had her own show for four years(2012-2016) on MSNBC. Unlike Sage Steele and Soledad O’Brien she decided to marry a black man.

Kylie Bunbury...

On the Fox show Pitch(2016-) biracial actress Kylie Bunbury plays Ginny Baker.  It’s a show about the first woman to play major league baseball.  So…they couldn’t find a woman that was just black??  Nope!  They have to cast the biracial woman as the center of attention.

Kara Royster....

This picture was very interesting to me.  I found it very eye opening.  This is part of the cast of the Disney show K.C. Undercover(2015-present). From left to right the actresses are Zendaya Coleman,Jasmine Guy,Kara Royster and Tammy Townsend. The first three women all have white mothers.  Townsend has a white father and a black mother.  That’s right..all of these women are biracial. How is that possible that ALL of them are biracial? They casted all biracial women.  Could this be an accident? I’ll let you decide.

BTS Miss Mulatto "No More Talking" photos by Thaddaeus McAdams for SoSoDef

This young lady is rapper Miss Mulatto.  That’s not a misprint,you read it right.  Her actual rape name is Miss Mulatto.  Her real name is Alyssa Stephens.  The 18- year old rapper is most known for being on the reality show The Rap Game.  I just find it interesting that she is capitalizing off of the popularity of being racially ambiguous. And using that as a way of being seen as unique in the rap world.

Tinashe...

Then we have pop singer Tinashe. She is biracial as well with a black father and white mother. She’s an okay dancer but not the best singer.  But you don’t have to be able to sing in the music industry anymore.  You just have to have the right “look”.  Maybe Tinashe will be the next Zendaya. Or the next Jordin Sparks? On the next Mya?  Who knows! I ‘m starting to get them all mixed up.

cynthia-robinson

Biracial actress Cynthia Addai-Robinson is getting a lot of roles lately.  She has appeared in films like Colombiana and The Accountant.  And shows like Texas Rising,Arrow and Shooter.

jamie-lee-kirchner

Actress Jamie Lee Kirchner(pictured above) was born in Germany.  She has a black mother and white father. She has been in shows like  CSI,Dollhouse and Bull.  Although she has brown skin she is still biracial.  Some people get fooled by this. Not all biracial women have really light skin and light colored eyes.  Some of a bit more melanin but they don’t always have African-textured hair.  Many of them have lanky hair with a bit of a curl to it. This is just a small sample of biracial actresses and singers.  I could’ve listed a lot more.

black-women

But the main point is that many of these white Hollywood casting agents don’t think that deep brown skinned and dark chocolate-colored(not biracial) women are good enough. They don’t have the “exotic look” they’re looking for. They don’t want African(Original)looking women with black features representing the black race.  And they purposely promote biracial women in films and music as the standard.  Otherwise why do they keep doing this?  People say “well black people  come in many different shades”.  Okay then why do the biracial women get so much of the attention.  We all know why. The truth is white people(other races and some blacks) believe that  mixed race women are more  attractive than black women.  They don’t think that black women that are 85% black or more should be the standard.  But this colorism madness needs to STOP!  There are plenty of darker skinned actresses and singers that don’t get the shine they deserve.  I want all my sisters to get the limelight.  She can have  full lips,thick thighs,african textured hair and dark skin.  This is not about bashing biracial woman. Like I have said before,I have biracial people in my family.  I have cousins that have married whites and Mexicans(Hispanic whites). I But I don’t consider them black..they are mixed.  This one-drop rule has gotten out of control. I don’t have any hatred towards them. I have nothing against them. But it’s time to stop putting black beauty on the back burner. Black/African women have their own unique beauty that should be celebrated. I just don’t think it’s “fair” to give them most of the shine while black women are an afterthought. Lisa Bonet is a pretty woman.  But a black woman shouldn’t have to look like Lisa to get some credit for her beauty.

Liberating the minds of Black Children-Bobby E. Wright

Black image....

We must be about the business of liberating the minds of Black
children. In order for that to occur, the minds of all Blacks who
interact with them must also be liberated. There is no other way.
It is relatively easy to educate Black children, even about their
Africanity. But, it is extremely difficult to reinforce the
education. Therefore, even sitting in the same classroom, white
children will be ‘educated’ and Black children will be ‘trained.’
The white child will be taught how to rule and the Black child
trained to be ruled. ‘Training’ is defined as teaching a group what
to think rather than how to think, making them dependent rather than
assisting in developing skills which could be used for independent
activity, rewarding behavior that operates against their group’s
interest, promoting individual rather than group achievement, and
instilling negative self-concepts and low self-esteem. The opposite
of the above mentacidal process (training) is education in which the
learning process becomes a liberating force.
Black independent schools are important not only for how they
teach but for what is taught. Their purpose of instilling within
Black children an ‘Afrikan Worldview’ is the most important activity
those children will ever experience. Black parents whose children
are not in independent schools should at a minimum expose them to a
well-structured supplemental Black educational program. Some of the
most dangerous Blacks in the world are many of those brothers and
sisters who finished graduate school ‘with honors’ and yet operate
against the interest of Blacks because of their eurocentric
orientation. The writer does not mean to imply that Blacks should
not attempt to achieve high levels of ‘training’ in white
institutions, but should be aware that it is not ‘education’ they
are receiving.”

Black Transgender Women/Men: Redefining Womanhood?

Janet Mock...

Take a real good look at this person.  This is a black man. Or is it? Well I guess it depends on who you ask.  This person on the cover of Metro Weekly is Janet Mock.  The tagline on the magazine says “mighty real”.  Which is very misleading since there is not much real when looking at this cover.  You see Janet Mock  was born a man.  Which means he has a penis.   As far as I know he hasn’t had his penis removed so he’s still a man. But that’s my definition.  But according to this deranged European culture I’m living in I’m supposed to call him a woman. But isn’t Janet just a man in a dress? If I put on an astronaut suit does it make me an astronaut? If I paint myself white does it make me a white man?  I wouldn’t think so.  But the fact they we have to call these people a certain gender because it’s what they “feel” like shows you we are way off course.  We have really lost our minds.

Laverne1...

And what’s really scary is that more and more black people are accepting this false reality.  One of the most popular men  in this transgender movement  is Laverne Cox(pic above).  Cox has been on numerous mainstream magazine covers. He’s been on so many I’ve lost count.  Covers that many authentic black women have never been on.  Why is that?  Is the racist white media trying to redefine black womanhood? Are they trying to portray black women as more masculine by having men imitate them? Sure looks like it to me.  I think it’s a way to destroy the divine feminine principle. It seems like a combination of both sexism and racism.  In a way it’s an insult to both black men and women. Are they trying to get rid of black alpha males? This is really sick and twisted!

Laverne Cox1...

Amiyah Scott....

Then we have actor Amiyah Scott. Amiyah is on the drama Star. Star is produced by well known homosexual Lee Daniels.  Much like his other show Empire,Star is full of masculine lesbians,homosexuals,transgenders,violence,crime and interracial sex.  All the things Daniels loves to portray as normal for the black community.  By having more transgenders on network television it normalizes it.  Which is the purpose in my view.

I don’t really follow the transgender/homosexual culture so I never knew about this.  But they actually have transgender contests.  It’s really big in Atlanta.  The video(above) is a contest in which men compete to see who looks the most like a woman.  It’s called the “I AM BALL” contest.  I could tell they were all men so I don’t know how the hell you pick  a winner.

Lesbians...

Not to be left out but they also have a competition for a female to male transition.  This is were females compete to see who looks the most like a man. This is really crazy to watch.  I can’t believe they actually have a contest for this type of thing.  What the hell is going on in Atlanta? I thought it was knows as “Black Mecca”.  Is this what our people are now embracing?

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche is a Nigerian writer of novels and short stories.  In the video(above) she says that you can’t compare the struggles of women that were born women with transwomen.  She says that it’s not the same thing because they have been women since birth.  Just so you know the term being used today is cisgender. You will hear terms like cis male or cis female.  Which means “male assigned male at birth”. Assigned??  I thought that you are whatever you were at birth.  But you see how they’re making up all these terms to confuse us. Well at any rate Adiche was attacked by actor Laverne Cox. Cox disagreed with Adiche’s statement.   Although she didn’t address Adiche directly,here’s the statement by Cox:

“I was talking to my twin brother today about whether he believes I had male privilege growing up. I was a very feminine child though I was assigned male at birth. My gender was constantly policed. I was told I acted like a girl and was bullied and shamed for that. My femininity did not make me feel privileged. I was a good student and was very much encouraged because of that but I saw cis girls who showed academic promise being nurtured in the black community I grew up in in Mobile, Ala. Gender exists on a spectrum & the binary narrative which suggests that all trans women transition from male privilege erases a lot of experiences and isn’t intersectional. Gender is constituted differently based on the culture we live in. There’s no universal experience of gender, of womanhood. To suggest that is essentialist & again not intersectional. Many of our feminist foremothers cautioned against such essentialism & not having an intersectional approach to feminism. Class, race, sexuality, ability, immigration status, education all influence the ways in which we experience privilege so though I was assigned male at birth I would contend that I did not enjoy male privilege prior to my transition. Patriarchy and cissexism punished my femininity and gender nonconformity. The irony of my life is prior to transition I was called a girl and after I am often called a man. Gender policing & the fact that gender binaries can only exist through strict policing complicates the concept of gendered privilege & that’s OK cause it’s complicated. Intersectionality complicates both male and cis privilege. This is why it is paramount that we continue to lift up diverse trans stories. For too many years there’s been far too few trans stories in the media. For over 60 years since Christine Jorgensen stepped off the plane from Europe and became the first internationally known trans woman the narrative about trans folks in the media was one of macho guy becomes a woman. That’s certainly not my story or the stories of many trans folks I know. That narrative often works to reinforce binaries rather than explode them. That explosion is the gender revolution I imagine,one of true gender self determination.”

What was this garbage?  This Cox character has lost his mind! All this talk of gender policing and gender binaries is total nonsense.  He was assigned male at birth because he is a MAN.  It’s just that simple.  All these terms are just going to confuse the younger generation.  They will see homosexuals,lesbians and transgenders as just normal behavior.    This is why men like Cox,Janet Mock and Amiyah Scott are given books and television appearances.

Gender neutral....

This is another reason people are debating gender neutral restrooms.  Why is this even a debate?  A man in a dress should not be able to go into a women’s restroom.  There are little girls in there.  No one wants a man pretending to be a woman in a women’s restrooms.  And I don’t think most men would want a transgender men in a men’s restroom.  This shows you how sick European culture has become.  It is going right down the toilet.  And this is all by design.  And this is a serious issue for black people because we live among them.  It is destroying how we view sexuality and womanhood. As I said before I think it’s a way of redefining black womanhood. And to destroy the divine feminine principle.  I hope black people are paying attention.  We are truly living in Hell.