R. Kelly: Sexual Predator or Scapegoat?

Kelly2...

I anticipate that this post will be unpopular. I acknowledge the contention that my assertions will certainly prompt and welcome the scathing comments in the section below. With that being said, I still very must feel that my perspective is worthy of articulation and exposure to those that care to listen.

Singer and R&B legend R.Kelly made headlines this week for allegedly assembling a sex cult consisting of underaged girls. These allegations bear a disturbing connection to R. Kelly’s previous trouble with the law, portraying Kelly as a an OJ-like figure–a haughty  recidivist who finagled through the loopholes of the American legal system.
I feel obliged to state that I have no respect for R. Kelly as a man. I do however, respect his talent. I perceive the ‘Pied Piper’ as an enslaved black who used America’s need to hyper sexualize the black man as a means to foment his career. While Kelly defiantly made family friendly songs like “Step in The Name of Love” and inspirational songs like “I Believe I Can Fly” and “The World’s Greatest” most of Kelly’s hits are sexualized slow jams to which I’m sure proved background music to the conception of many post millennials. His sexualized image fueled a career spanning over two decades with a plethora of adoring black female fans.

These fans remained loyal to Kelly even after a video surfaced of the singer issuing a golden shower to a then-fifteen year old girl. The charges were eventually dropped and buried in the past of a musician who was still able to maintain his mogul stature despite dramatic changes in the music industry.
While my argument is not to pardon R. Kelly from blame, it is that he is not the primary cause of the hyper-sexualized black female body that faces violation without consequence. R. Kelly was relieved of any legal responsibility in previous allegations of sexually violating a black female teen simply because the black female body bears no significance to the Western world outside of monetary gain. Consider how quickly the western world kills and incarcerates the black body.  The reason why Kelly was not susceptible to these consequences is not because of his riches, but because his “crimes” served an integral purpose in maintaining white supremacy. Moreover, the world was and is more interested in portraying Kelly and his victim as sexual beasts than to upholding the integrity of those they do not see as a human let alone bearing the presumed innocence of femininity or childhood.
To the western gaze, the hyper sexuality of the young black female body violently seduces Kelly. To this same gaze, Kelly is a sexualized being unable to resist the callings of his bestial urges. Together, these caricatured images of black sexuality function assemble the historical narrative of blacks as primitive and underdeveloped beings worthy of the death and incarceration that befalls them.

Kelly3...

Kelly, a melanated individual who believes his conventional success consummates his transition to whiteness, feels as entitled to young bodies as the white man did and does to young black females. Kelly, is a symbol of what happens when a morally impoverished black youth offsets a journey to acquire physical wealth and not a collective consciousness. As members of an oppressed collective, it is essential that we proceed with consciousness. To proceed without it, is to inevitably mirror our oppressors in thought and action.

There is also a large possibility that this ordeal is entirely fictional, and yet another means to lynch a black man by the rope of hyper sexuality. But the verity of these accusations does little to supersede its societal function. The scenario depicts how the black man and women are commonly pitted against one another and how the black male is villanized for implementing what he was nurtured to idolize—white male ideology.

The teachings of white supremacy are second nature to anyone not possessing a conscious gaze. I read The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, a few years back and was mortified at what Pecola’s father does to her on the kitchen floor. I resented Morrison for years, holding her in contempt for depicting the black man as indifferently robbing his child of her innocence.

It took me several strides into consciousness to realize that the father was a man systemized and nurtured to become an animal, a subjugate human who performs the dirty work of his master in his oppressed state. This is not an excuse, as his actions are detestable and hard to read, yet even more difficult to process as a factual fate rendered to so many blacks throughout the diaspora silent in the shame of their systemic violation.

Kelley1...

Kelly symbolically stands in the same image of this fictional black man who encompasses the factual narrative of so many other black males castrated by earthly demons who program the black body to inflict white evil onto their own people.

Kelly’s actions function to lure black women from blackness into the arms of feminism–yet example of society’s dedication to turning racist issues into sexist issues to further the cyclical disenfranchisement of blacks by hurling our struggle into oblivion. A second offense by a black praised for his prodigious talent, serves another blow to our collective identity alongside similar allegations afforded to other black greats like the late Michael Jackson, Bill Cosby, Kobe Bryant, amongst others. These allegations function to fuel white esteem and denigrate black collective worth in staining the black psyche with portraits of themselves that seemingly lack a moral compass.

So, to those quick to compartmentalize a black man as a sexual villain— I would like to redirect your attention to the words of the late and great Malcolm X:

“If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.”

To what contempt will you hold a system that upholds the systemic soiling of black female bodies?

To reiterate I am in no way excusing Kelly, but evoking a sense of nationalism to assert that we as a collective have been wronged by a system that lures us to incessantly blame ourselves but seldom confront the  true villain and sole benefactor of global racism.

In closing, the power of blackness lies largely in realizing if and when we are being played. So while we may not be playing chess, our systemized state as blacks bears a close resemblance to a king being used to seize the most powerful piece of the game–his queen.

Article by CC Saunders

Suzann Christine- Fly

I love this new song by Suzann Christine.  She is one of my favorite singer/songwriters at the moment. I like the video and she has her own unique fashion style.  Here’s her short biography:

Suzann Christine...

Class, creativity, and raw talent is what the 2012 Philly Hip Hop Award winner for “Best Female R&B Artist“ Suzann Christine offers her many fans and followers with the fun yet relatable R&B/Pop music she is known for. Within the past year, this singer/songwriter has been introduced to the airwaves and social networks, winning the hearts and ears of thousands within her hometown of Philadelphia and throughout the country. Opening for artists such as Keyshia Cole, Raheem Devaughn, Ryan Leslie, and Philly’s own Musiq Soulchild, being chosen as one of the top 10 artist to make it in the Andre Harrell “2010 Superstar Soul Search” for Philly, launching the Philadelphia Phillies Official Playoff Anthem with Philly’s hit station Wired 96.5, being the Grand Prize winner of Citi Trends “The Big Break Talent Search” with her single Closed Casket, performing as a featured artist for BB Kings R&B spotlight, opening for Melanie Fiona, Wale, TI, Waka Flocka Flame and other notable artists at the popular RadioOne Fest; consistently releasing new music and gaining features on multiple websites/blogs and spins on popular radio stations such as Philly’s Hot 107.9. Suzann Christine has proven to her fans that she will provide nothing shy of greatness. Suzann Christine has built her following through collabs with local artists, YouTube covers with 30,000+ views and performances throughout Philadelphia, New York City, Baltimore, Miami and more. When this well-rounded artist is not performing and making new music, she’s giving back to her community through her performing arts nonprofit she founded in 2010, SCH Creative & Performing Arts, volunteer work and participation in charity events. Suzann Christine prides herself on having an “outside of the box” mentality when it comes to music and creativity, but still focusing on positivity while bringing back real music with a new age twist.

Militant Mulattoes: Jesse Williams,Zaza Ali and J. Cole

Jesse Williams...

This past Sunday was the BET Awards.  It’s a celebration of black music,television and film.  I used to watch the award show years ago but it doesn’t hold my interest much anymore.  Mainly because the show promotes music that denigrates black women,colorism,negative images of black people and all around anti-blackness. But yesterday all over the news they were covering a speech given by biracial actor Jesse Williams.  He was given the Humanitarian Award and gave a passionate speech about racism ,oppression,police brutality and cultural appropriation.  That’s a lot to cover under four minutes.  Williams is an actor on the ABC drama Grey’s Anatomy. Some fear he may lose his job for speaking out on these issues.  I highly doubt he will lose his job. If anything he will be praised for speaking on these issues.  Here’s what he said:

This is for the real organizers all over the country, the activist, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do. It’s kinda basic mathematics: the more we learn about who we are and how we got here the more we will mobilize.

“This award is also for the black women in particular who have spent their lives nurturing everyone before themselves – we can and will do better for you.

“Now, what we’ve been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to de-escalate, disarm and not kill white people every day. So what’s going to happen is we’re going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function and ours.

“I got more, y’all. Yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice’s 14th birthday so I don’t want to hear any more about how far we’ve come when paid public servants can pull a drive-by on a 12-year-old playing alone in a park in broad daylight, killing him on television, and then going home to make a sandwich.

“Tell Rekia Boyd how it’s so much better to live in 2012 than 1612 or 1712. Tell that to Eric Garner, Sandra Bland.

“The thing is though, all of us here are getting money, that alone isn’t going to stop this. Dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back to put someone’s brand on our body – when we spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies, and now we pray to get paid for brands on our bodies?

“There has been no war that we have not fought and died on the front lines of. There is no job we haven’t done, there is no tax they haven’t levied against us, and we have paid all of them.

“But freedom is always conditional here. ‘You’re free!’ they keeping telling us. ‘But she would be alive if she hadn’t acted so … free.’ Now, freedom is always coming in the hereafter, but the hereafter is a hustle: We want it now.

“Let’s get a couple of things straight. The burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander – that’s not our job so let’s stop with all that. If you have a critique for our resistance then you’d better have an established record, a critique of our oppression.

“If you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do: sit down.

“We’ve been floating this country on credit for centuries, and we’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil – black gold! – ghettoizing and demeaning our creations and stealing them, gentrifying our genius and then trying us on like costumes before discarding our bodies like rinds of strange fruit.

“Just because we’re magic doesn’t mean we’re not real.

“Thank you.”

It was a decent speech and he touched on a lot of issues.  But I noticed when they showed his parents in the audience I noticed his white mother.  I think this causes a lot of confusion for black people.  Can you be pro-black with a white parent? This is something I’ve noticed over the last few years.  There are many biracial people coming out speaking on the black struggle.  Many biracial people have gotten the spotlight in the entertainment and sports world.

Drake...

Canadian rapper Drake is one of the biggest rappers in the industry right now. This is his white mother,Sandi.

Alicia...

Grammy award winning singer/actress  Alicia Keys has spoken on issues that affect the black community.  Even though her mother Terria is a white woman.

J Cole1..

Rapper J. Cole gets a lot of praise for dropping socially conscious lyrics. This pic is of him and his mother Kay.

Bob Marley..

Some people tend to forget but legendary reggae singer Bob Marley sang about black unity and African people.  Even though he  had a white father.

Zaza...

On the black conscious circuit there is a biracial woman named Zaza Ali.  I first be familiar with her back in 2013.  She was doing a radio show with rapper Professor Griff.  She touched on issues such as black empowerment,religion,feminism,racism and politics.  She became quite popular in a short time.  Since then she and Griff have parted ways.  And she is now doing lectures and selling dvd’s and books.  I got the felling she was using Griff to get to the next level on the lecture circuit.  Also I think she knows that her light skin,white features and “good hair” will attract more attention then the darker skinned black women.  She is using the fact that many black people are self loathing and will fawn over her looks.  And she has become quite successful in the process. Many people believe she was a fraud from the beginning.  I also heard that she dated Griff and the broke up after she was down with him.  I can’t say I’m surprised at all.  Shame on Griff for falling for it.

In this video(above) Zaza is confronted by a caller on a radio show.  The caller asks her can she truly be against white supremacy if she has a white mother.  You will notice in the video that Zaza never answers the question.  I’m not really surprised at her response.  This also goes back to the Jesse Williams speech.  Can you really fight this racist system if your parent is white?  How can you give 100% against white racism if you came from a white vagina?  I don’t think it’s really possible. A mother is the first person a baby learns to love.  Your mother fed you and cared for you as a baby. Now you’re going to fight against the people who look just like her. NO way in Hell is that going to happen.  Black people need major systematic change for the empowerment of how our people.  And I just don’t think most biracial/mixed people are going to go all the way when the time comes. Also  Jesse Williams is working on a documentary about the Black Lives Matters movement. I have already covered how BLM is funded by rich white folks.  Any movement funded by your open enemy will not liberate you.  Always remember that.

https://kushiteprince.wordpress.com/2015/08/05/black-lives-matter-black-power-or-gay-rights-movement/

So while it was nice that Williams spoke out against white racism it is nothing new.  Marcus Garvey spoke about that decades ago.  Williams talked about police brutality.  Kwame Toure did that years ago. So let’s not act like Williams is the next Malcolm X.  He brought up issues that should be brought up but he said nothing new. It’s just that he was given a large platform to say it to millions of people so it’s getting a lot of hype.  You must also keep in mind that BET is owned by Viacom. The president is a white man named Philippe Dauman. This speech was planned in advance.  They already knew what he was going to say.  This was no surprise. They used this opportunity to stir up some controversy and get people talking.  And it worked.  Black people get excited when we hear some truth don’t we?  But I believe that hearing pro-black rhetoric is more palatable when coming from biracial people.  It’s more acceptable by whites when they hear it from them because they know they have a white parent.  So they don’t take it that seriously.  And many black people suffer from low self esteem so we like hearing this language from someone with light skin,straight hair and light colored eyes.  And Jesse knew what he was doing when he shouted out the black women.  Many black women in the audience were standing up clapping.  I’m sure many of them were fawning over his light skinned ambiguous looks. Much the same way Zaza Ali many times will come down hard on black women.  And she will talk about black men in a positive light.  And of course many black men in the conscious community fawn over her and call her a “real Black queen”.  Do you see the pattern?  I’m telling you,these biracial people know exactly what they’re doing.  I understand they can’t help their parent is a white person. They have no control over that.  But I just wonder why they are given a platform to speak so often on black issues.  They are not of majority African descent.  They maybe non-whte but that doesn’t automatically make them black either. So what do you think? Should they be given a platform to speak for us?  And also can they be genuine in the struggle…if they have a white parent?

https://blackmystory.wordpress.com/2016/06/29/what-the-jessie-williams-speech-at-the-bet-awards-tells-me/#comment-35102

 

 

Do you have a Black Liberation Mindset?


1. Study-Oriented: reads, evaluates and debates books, newspapers, magazines and scholarly journals. Accepts the challenge of education.

2. Worker: looks for ways in which to actively work for self; may hold a job outside in order to sustain self and family. Self-Reliant.

3. Organized and Systematic – efficient and diligent.

4. Progressively Collective; conscious of others; Cooperative.

5. Family Oriented: regards mate as partner in struggle; loves children. Values trust in relationships.

6. Land Conscious: realizes that the only thing that nobody is making any more of is land.

7. Disciplined: strong, unyielding and energetic.

8. Serious. Practices fair play, order and punctuality. Honest and dependable.

9. Analytical and critical.

10. Frugal: buys mainly on need basis; saves.

11. Social life is developmental and involves children.

12. Creatively Aggressive: will dare the impossible if it is possible.

13. Respects Elders.

14. Dislikes incompetence and mediocrity.

15. Fights against Black on Black crime and understands that its root is white on Black crime.

16. Loves Black art, music and literature.

17. Can give and follow instructions. Encourages experimentation and criticism.

18. Committed to Black Liberation – local, national and international.

19. Does not use drugs.

20. Politically Active. Not crisis-oriented; acts on information rather than reacts. Plans ahead for the long term; alert; prepared for change.

21. Self-Confident. Respects others regardless of race or culture.

22. Understands the economic forces that control our lives on a local, national and international level.

23. Rational in decisions and actions.

24. Rewards merit and achievement.

How did Major Record Companies take control of Black Music?(Part 3)



Groups and artists such as the Original Dixieland Jazz
Band; Paul Whiteman labeled the
King Of Jazz; Tommy Dorsey called the King Of Swing;
Elvis Presley promoted as the King
Of Rock n Roll; along with Pat Boone, The Rolling Stones,
The Beatles, The Osmonds,
Kenny G, Herb Alpert, David Sanborn, Jeff Lorber, Teena
Marie, Michael McDonald, are
only some of the White artists and groups, who in the past
or present, play(ed) black
music.
White artists have been copying black music since the
Spirituals, during the time of
slavery. It was not until the 1970s that music by black
artists was accepted as a stable
financial endeavor. Evolving beyond the race records of the
1920s, and Rhythm & Blues
recordings of the 1950s, which were distributed mainly in
black communities. It was
around the time of the study that the record industry began
to make heavy financial
investments into black music: making more album
commitments, rather than singles,
promoting it to pop stations, investing more marketing
dollars and making stronger
efforts in international distribution.
Mr. Barnes concludes: So he said their key then, If we
cannot make black music without
black people, then we must have a way of controlling the
black music industry. One way
of doing this, with the use of the study, was to expose the
techniques in which a successful
black business, such as Stax Records, was operating. For
example, when Al Bell, owner of
Stax Records read the study, he revealed this about his
companys business operatives:

…the Harvard report was an excellent study of our
approach at Stax on operating a black
phonograph record company, in total…Prior to that study,
our business methodology was
unknown. So as a result of that, we had very little
competition. No one knew what we were
doing. We were able to build a business at our own pace.
Subsequent to revelations in that
study, the competition became much more intense.
Not only did the competition proliferate, CBS sued Stax in
order to stop the business
agreement between Al Bell and Clive Davis (who was later
fired from CBS). In effect, the
suit served to legally exhaust Stax, a common corporate
tactic used in battling an
opponent in court. As a result, Stax was not financially able
to compete with CBS in court,
and ultimately ceased doing business.
Bell tried to fight back: We filed an anti-trust suit against
CBS for $67,000,000, alleging
violation of the Sherman-Patton Anti-Trust Act. Bell said,
We alleged clandestine activities
on their part to try to stop it (the agreement). That’s a part of
the court records. So I
suppose that its fair to say, and I want to be really clear on
this, I suppose its fair to say
that some of the people, the executives in CBS, and
employed by CBS at the time, played a
very significant role in the demise of Stax.
Larkin Arnold, former Senior Vice President of Artist and
Repertoire Black Music – CBS
Records, and a long time veteran in the music business,
disagrees: I doubt anyone, any
corporation or any group of corporations made a concerted
effort to extinguish black
companies, black record companies. Its like any other
aspect of business life. If a major
corporation decides to enter into a market place, its only a
very, very strong smaller
company that can survive. Whether were talking about
mom and pop grocery stores, or
little gasoline stations. If Gulf comes in there, they’re going
for the market aggressively, in
which they should do. If you cant compete, you are going to
go by the wayside.
We may never know the full effect the demise of Stax
Records, the suit against Solar
Records, compounded with the purchase of Motown
Records, had on the development
of black music, or the desire to develop a full service black owned
record company. Some
things are evident, there still is not one black-owned full
service record company in
America (production, manufacturing, distribution). This
would take us from being
consumers to owners/investors, the root of financial power,
leading to political power.
The deeper effect may not be just the control of black
music, but control of the black
intellect and black culture. Since major record companies
captured control of black
music, especially the huge explosion of black youth music
(rap/hip hop) the proliferation
of profanity and sexism against black women has
enormously expanded. So-called
conscious or meaningful black music seems to have faded
in the background or garners
very little radio airplay. If there were no blues, jazz, reggae,
and a very small hand full of
conscious commercial black music artists in America, there
would be no substance or
uniqueness in black music at all.
If ever there is another research effort like the Harvard
study, let the black record labels
and radio station entrepreneurs get together with some
black colleges and develop not
only sound business practices and self defense in
business, but explore how the ancient
Afrikans in the Nile Valley built those great empires, and
use that as a template to do the
same. Strong black-owned institutions are needed for the
music the world is dancing to.
If not, good, solid, meaningful black music may sorrowfully
become a thing of the past.
Some feel that has already happened. The generations to
come may be left with the same
discussion many debate today, what happened to that
really good black music of the 60s
and 70s, or even the conscious rap of the 80s?
This is an excerpt from the book “Star Holocaust”.