Melanin by D’Nessa McDaniel

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From the night in her skin to kink of her hair

The sun in her smile to the stars in those eyes

I know that Melanin is beautiful

The beauty that glows through her

blood like magic

Her melanin drips like honey

Can you imagine a voice so sweet you could taste the diabetes

Can you imagine how the tears of this woman will make rivers

You will find the souls of her sons floating in

Dreams of haunting, of prey, of white of guns of nose,

nose is tight like she is tight like a nose

This kind of melanin

This kind of woman

Makes the worst days worth living for

Makes trying to live some of the worst days

But this type of melanin is strong

Even when the pavement of her heart starts to crack under oppression

She will still bleed love, hope, smiles, and laughter

she will bleed the bloodshed of her father’s death

She will ache the pain of the weight her mother carried on her black

Because of this I know that melanin is beautiful

Is pain, is sorrow, is love, is her

She is love

She is what made melanin so damn beautiful.

Poem by D’Nessa McDaniel

Black Beauty Appreciation(Melanin Heaven)

Kushite Cover...

I have a lot of pictures I’ve collected over the years. I have collected hundreds of beautiful images of black women over a period of time.  Many of them I have never used in a post. So I thought I would post some of the beauties from the 70’s,80’s,90’s…up into the present.  You may recognize some of the faces.  Others you may not. Some of them are beauty contest winners,famous actresses,aspiring models and singers.  This post is open for anyone to put up pictures of black women they think are beautiful or exceptional in some way.  This post is a celebration of all the beautiful women in the African diaspora.  Or as I call it Melanin Heaven! Enjoy!

GL17......

GL7....

GL18......

GL6....

GL19.....

GL20......

Patrice Rushen....

Anita Baker....

Whitney....

Karyn White....Phyllis Hyman....

GL15......

PL8.....

Toni Braxton...

Aaliyah....

GL14.....

PL4.....

Kateria5..

GL12....

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GL8....

 

Ciara....

GL4...

PL4....

Alexys Jay....

GL5....

GL5....

GL3....GL13.....

GL16....Lupita1....GL6....

Black Queen3...

Danielle1....

Yaya DaCosta....

GL8....

Miss Nigeria...

Miss Ghana....

Leila Lopes...

Lanisha2...

GL13...

GL11....

GL17....

Denise Boutte....

GL14....

GL12....

Ebony Obsidian...

PL1....

Pretty Ladies1....

GL15....

Karen O....

 

GL10....

Carnival beauty....

GL2....

Ebonee Davis

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Model Ebonee Davis is one of the biggest rising stars in the fashion industry. She’s starred in massive Calvin Klein campaigns, graced the pages of Sports Illustrated: Swimsuit Edition, walked in countless shows and been featured in countless magazine spreads.

But it wasn’t exactly an easy journey to success, nor does she find her career perfect now. In a powerful, must-watch TED Talk, the 23-year-old model detailed the pervasive racism she’s experienced in the industry, concluding with an uplifting screed on Black Girl Magic.

Davis starts out by describing how she began relaxing her hair at the age of four, convinced by the media and the world at large that what she already had wasn’t beautiful. “To be born Black in America is to be born into a world that makes you feel inferior before you can even take your first step,” she said. “It is to be under constant spiritual and mental attack.”

She detailed moving to New York from Seattle as a teenager to model, where people in the industry frequently asked “where she was from.” She told them she was from Seattle.

“I figured that once I got a contract, the industry would open up for me,” Davis said. “But at every turn, I was met with resistance. I had white agents with no knowledge of Black hair care run their fingers through my hair and tell me things like, ‘We already have a girl with your look.’ Translation: All Black girls look the same.”

She was hurt by agents telling her, “We just don’t know what to do with you.” Her face was “painted grey” by makeup artists, stylists burned and pulled out her hair to the point where she “had to start over,” and she was discouraged from wearing her hair natural (she did it anyway).

“I was told not to work for publications like Essence and Ebony magazines, because if I got labeled an ‘urban model,’ the fashion industry would close its doors to me,” she said. She appeared in the March issue of Essence. Her career is bigger than ever.

Despite everything she’s gone through, Davis continues to rise in the industry, and due to her fame and success, she has a powerful platform to speak out about inclusion (she does not want to be the one Black model, checking some kind of box, but rather see representation across the board).

“Despite the great injustices we face as Black women, we can, and have, and will rise out of the ashes, and become examples of resilience, drive, and excellence,” she said. “I like to call this Black Girl Magic. And with this magic we are creating our own publications, we are creating our own television shows. We are creating our own narrative.”

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Rachel Joy Williams

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Rachel Joy Williams is a beautiful black model.  She is from Britain from of Jamaican/Caribbean descent. She was crowned Miss Black Britain in 2006 and went on to compete in the Miss England pageant. Here’s a short interview she did:

Tell us a little bit about yourself. Why modelling and when did you first begin modeling?

Rachael: I never actually wanted to be a model. It was my cousin who entered me into the beauty pageant.

At that point in my life I had very low self-esteem and [lacked] confidence (due to being bullied in school); I was so shocked I won but to my family, this was just the beginning.

you could meet anyone in the world dead or alive who would it be and what would say to them?
Rachael: I would love to meet Cleopatra and ask her if she really did bathe in milk and honey daily!

How do you prepare for a modeling shoot?
Rachael: It really depends on the shoot. But I’ll always wash and prep my hair, fully wax, eat clean a few days before just so I’m not bloated and to prevent any spots from appearing on my face.

Has your current experience as a model of color been mostly positive or negative?

Overall my main experience as a model has been positive, I’m my own boss, I decide on all the work I do, I get to travel nearly every month, all the jobs are different, I’m always meeting new people, there is no routine and sometimes, I get to keep the clothes!

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On occasions I do experience negativity from clients, agencies and the even general public in regards to my weight, my complexion, my attitude, my style e.t.c but I don’t let any of that bother me as I know where I am going and I do not need to entertain that along the way.

Have you found that there has been an increase of other models of color since you started, or does the modeling industry still have a long way to go in recruiting models of color?

When I started out, what attracted me to the industry was that there was quite a few models of color that actually working within the industry despite all the negativity surrounding it.

Leomie Anderson

Leomie Anderson...

Leomie Anderson is a Bristish model. She was born February 15,1993. First discovered by a Premier scout on her way home from school, Leomie has gone onto work with a host of prolific designers including Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Chloe, Moschino, Loewe, Giles Deacon, Paco Rabanne, Vivienne Westwood and Topshop Unique. She has also shot for Italian Vogue, AnOther, Dazed & Confused, i-D and Teen Vogue. Of recent Leomie has walked in the infamous Victoria’s Secrets runway show.