2017 Women’s March: Black Female Perspective

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Following Trump’s inauguration a series of Women’s Marches occurred throughout North America. The protests erupted to preserve the female liberties seemingly threatened by a “conservative” president who boasted of sexually assaulting women. As a female, I empathize and even support the initiatives that foment this March. However, although a woman, I know that I am inevitably black first. Thus, I can’t help but feel that by supporting the women’s march is to support the very means of my oppression.

On my a tri-weekly journey to a previous job, I recall seeing a number of protestors outside of Planned Parenthood at the wee hours of the morning seeking to shame female patrons. One protestor stood out from the others—an elderly white man surely north of seventy-five. He stood hunched over, holding an oaktag with a message written in ballpoint pen. I did not bother to read the poster, but judging by the stoic expression on his face, he was there to cast the stones of white male privilege onto the female body. Standing at the intersectionality of race and gender, the black woman knows this gaze all to well. While the literal gaze casts itself onto the black female body countless places throughout North America, the figurative gaze consumes black femininity in its entirety. The women’s march solely speaks to the “woman” component of this gaze, eliminating the most defining characteristic of black female identity.

Reproductive rights in general proves controversial to  the black female trajectory. A quick glance at history reveals that the black female endured sheer deprivation in terms of reproductive rights—her body used as means for mayoral economic franchisement. White women too encompassed an existence that also regarded them as property, however their fair skin warranted privileges denied to the black female body. These exclusive liberties afforded to white women illustrate the concept of “woman” as a privilege solely applicable to non-male whites. Consider the phrasing “black” woman. The label “Black woman” illustrates that black female intersectionality separates black females from the term’s initial meaning. For any “woman” of another marginalized faction, their race or ethnicity always precedes the term woman—proving their genitals deem them female but their race and ethnicity is first and foremost. Femininity is also a privilege extended exclusively to non-male whites. This exclusivity persists as the black female body only earns femininity when adopting western aesthetics and behavior.

Given the exclusivity of the term “woman,” I find it quite disturbing that white women ( and other oppressed groups) call on the black women for support in their times of distress, yet alienate the black female body when their children, brothers and fathers lay slain on the streets or untagged in the morgue. How many white women “said her name” after Sandra Bland was murdered? How many white women were overtly outraged after the Trayvon Martin verdict was rendered?

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To take a trip down memory lane, how many white female feminists supported Tawana Brawley in her 1988 trial? If autonomy over the female body is right every woman deserves- why was their no feminist congregation when this young, black girl was sexually assaulted by a number of white men? The answer is simple.  Issues that engage both blackness and femininity become “black” issues instantaneously. This fact reveals that feminism is simply not built to encompass intersectional identities and thereby is not equipped to extinguish black female disenfranchisement.

It seems that former President Barack Obama’s victory disgruntled feminists, who supported this victory as long as it was a symbol of the feminist victory to follow.  It seems feminists felt that history would repeat itself. Namely, black male voting privilege preceded white female voting liberties.  Thus, feminists deemed Clinton’s victory inevitable following Obama’s 2008 victory. Dr. Angela Davis expressed a similar sentiment in the following excerpt from her book Women, Race and Class,

“The representative women of the nation have done their uttermost for the last thirty years to secure freedom for the negro; and as long as he was lowest in the scale of being, we were willing to press his claims, but now, as the celestial gate to civil rights is sIowly moving on its hinges, it becomes a serious question whether we had better stand aside and see ‘Sambo’ walk into the kingdom first.” (Davis 70)

Now that it seems that the black collective has something that the white female collective does not, the bells of white privilege right loudly under the veil of feminism.

Feminism functions to afford white women the same liberties as white men. The main component of these liberties is racism—deeming black female participation in any feminist activity injurious. Thus, to participate in a woman’s march as a black woman is to   march along to the stagnant beat of white supremacy. For the black woman is a queen, but to the western world she will never truly be  a woman.

Article written by C.C. Saunders

Whitewashing of the Black Woman’s Image

fSPerfect Match..

The film The Perfect Match comes out today. I saw the  trailer for this  so-called “black romantic comedy” last week. It stars Terrence J,Cassie Ventura,Lauren London,Paula Patton,Dascha Polanco and Donald Faison. It looks like your typical romantic comedy Hollywood usually gives us.  The acting is not very good and we’ve seen this storyline countless times before. But that’s not my problem with the film.

What’s very disturbing is this film is being pushed in the urban(black)markets.  It’s been all over BET,TV One and many black radio stations.  I found this disturbing because all the main women in the film are biracial women.  All the women that are supposed to be desirable are mixed/biracial women.  The main love interest is played by actress/singer Cassie Ventura.  She’s most known for being  music producer Sean Combs on again/off again girlfriend. She’s not that great of a singer to begin with so I guess she wants to take a chance at acting.  Apparently  she’s not that great of an actress either. But Cassie is not even a black woman.  Her father is Filipino. And her mother is Black and Mexican.  Then there’s actress Lauren London.  Who is most know from the film ATL(2006). She also is know for having a baby with wannabe gangster rapper Lil Wayne.  Does that make her baby mama number 5 or 6?  Who knows?  Any Lauren’s father is a Jewish man and her mother is black. And actress Dascho Polanco is a mixed race Dominican woman.  This is the same old promotion of the “exotic mixed race” woman.  Once again we see the elimination of the dark-skinned African looking woman.  They do this over and over again. How can you have a “black film” with no women that LOOK black?  This is another slap in the face to black women!  And another example of whitewashing the black woman’s image. I’ve covered this topic before a few months ago.

https://kushiteprince.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/biracial-women-are-the-most-beautifuland-other-myths/

And this issue of pushing biracial woman as a better alternative to black woman is disgusting.  It’s an insult to all the beautiful dark skinned sistas out there. But this promotion of biracial/whitewashing of black women has been on an upswing the last few years.

Nina Simone1..

But nothing is more insulting than the upcoming Nina Simone biopic.  The director of the film cast Zoe Saldana as Nina.  This was an insult right from the start. Zoe Saldana has a Dominican father and Puerto rican mother.  Her biography says she also has Hatian and Lebanese roots.  But Nina Simone was unapologetically black.  She was a dark skinned woman with full lips and African textured hair.  All her life Nina was called ugly and unattractive because she looked African.  Saldana can’t relate to that.  She may be of African descent but her life is not a reflection of what Nina endured. The way Nina was treated was part of her music. It was the embodiment of who she was as a black woman. Also the family of Simone has denounced the film and were not involved. If Saldana had any integrity she would’ve turned this film down.  The put dark makeup on her and gave her a fake nose.  What the hell??I know she wanted a paycheck but this role is horrible for her.  She is not right for this role.  Why not just hire a dark skinned actress who can also sing?  Why not Lauryn Hill or India Arie?  Either one of them  would’ve  been better choices in my opinion. And I’m sure Simone would not approve of this.  This is nothing but a modern day blackface minstrel!

This is an interesting video.  It’s a few black actresses in Hollywood giving their opinion on Zoe Saldana playing Nina Simone.  Most of them gave politically correct answers.  You can tell that they were very uncomfortable not wanting to admit that a more black looking woman should’ve gotten the role.  Although actress Sheryl Lee Ralph was probably the most honest.

Coretta Scott King..

This casting of biracial/mixed has been going on for quite awhile.  Biracial actress Carmen Ejogo was cast as Coretta Scott King twice. Once in the film Boycott(2001) and the film Selma(2014).

Harriet Tubman...

In the film Abraham Lincoln:Vampire Hunter(2012)biracial actress Jacqueline Fleming played black hero Harriet Tubman.  Fleming looks nothing like Tubman at ALL!! This was an insult to our great abolitionist hero!  This is an attack on the African looking woman and the destruction of her image.  Some may think this is a small issue. But I disagree totally.  The media is blatantly whitewashing the image of black women on purpose.

Lupita...1

And in may cases they will lighten the skin of an actress on a magazine cover. As in the case of Lupita Nyong’o on the cover of Dazed & Confused…among others.

Precious...

Kerry W...

8 Cases Where A Black Celebrity Was Whitewashed For A Magazine Cover or Ad Campaign

https://raceandtechnology.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/whitewashing-in-mass-media-exploring-colorism-and-the-damaging-effects-of-beauty-hierarchies/

Proud Black Woman

African Woman

This whitewashing has to STOP!  This is a disgrace to all African women. And I want sistas to know that there are millions of brothers that love and support you.  I have talked to black men who have told me that they reject this whitewashing of Hollywood.  They love their sistas and reject this false image the media throws at us. So sistas stand tall and proud! You do not have to be mixed and biracial to be beautiful. You are beautiful just the way you are.  Much love to you…and stay strong. ❤

 

Tribute to Frances Cress Welsing

“Melanin is the black pigment which permits skins to appear other than white (black, brown, red and yellow). Melanin pigment coloration is the norm for the hue-man family. If there are non-white readers who disagree with this presentation of white rejection of the white-skinned self, may I refer you to the literature on the currently developing sun-tanning parlors.”

“Most important, Black males must help one another to understand that they are being led by the dynamic of white supremacy to inflict extreme damage upon themselves, one another and ultimately the Black race. Black males must understand that, contrary to what is said, the war being conducted in urban centers is not against drugs but against Black males- for the purpose of white genetic survival.”

“(It must be realized that no Black males manufacture the chemicals for drug use, nor do any Black males manufacture guns.)”

“The destruction of Black males for the purpose of white genetic survival is the reason behind the ever-increasing disparity between the \ number of Black females entering and graduating from high schools and institutions of higher education compared to the far lesser number of Black males.”

Frances

However, it must be understood that high levels of self-respect, will
and determination, without an adequate understanding, analysis and
definition of racism as the oppressing power system, will not be sufficient
to bring the long-sought goal of neutralizing that injustice and establishing
justice and peace for all people. Therefore, it is critical to have a
comprehensive analysis and definition of the opposing force. As a Black
behavioral scientist and practicing general and child psychiatrist, my
current functional definition of racism (white supremacy) is as follows: ,.,
the local and global power system  by persons
who classify themselves as white, whether consciously or subconsciously
determined; this system consists of patterns of perception, logic. symbol
formation. thought, speech, action and emotional response. as conducted
simultaneously in all areas of people activity (economics. education,
entertainment,labor, law, politics, religion, sex and war). The ultimate
purpose of the system is to prevent white genetic annihilation on Earth –
a planet in which the overwhelming majority of people are classified as
non-white (black, brown, red and yellow) by white-skinned people. All of
the non-white people are genetically dominant (in terms of skin coloration)
compared to the genetically recessive white-skinned people.