My Skin is My Sin- Is it time to go underground?(Part 2 of 2)

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I’ve been on social media for over a decade. I have been in contact with black people on WordPress,Youtube and Twitter.  And I’ve had subscribers share my posts on Twitter,Tumblr and Facebook.  I have had some great conversations with black people here in the United States as well as Africa,Canada,London,Brazil and Jamaica.  We have talked about many subjects.  On my blog I have covered black power,black love,black families,African culture,black leaders,black business,survival skills,police brutality,politics,prison population,African history,racism,slavery,interracial marriage,biracial people,conspiracies and of courseEuropean global power. Through my years of research I realize that the government is spying on everyone.  The can track your whereabouts with your cellphone.  The FBI and CIA are also recording all your phone conversations.  And all your text messages are sent to a central database.  They also can hear your conversation at home with Smart TV’s.  They are constantly spying on us everywhere.

Ninja2...

All this unnecessary surveillance has gotten out of control. All of our information is being consumed by the government. We must keep in mind that most of the social media is owned by white people.  YouTube,Instagram,Twitter,Tumblr,Wordpress,Google,Snapchat and Facebook are all owned and controlled by Europeans.  With so much surveillance you can’t really make any moves without them watching you.  Not to mention they can find most people using their email.  At times it feels like you can’t go anywhere without a closed caption camera in your face. There are cameras in banks,schools,hotels,airports,hospitals,restaurants and bars.  We are really living in a prison planet.

And if all this surveillance wasn’t enough people you still have people willingly giving up their personal information.  They have trained us to give up our information voluntarily and can use that information to create a personal database about the person.  The video(above) is an Apple advertisement for the new iPhone X.  It shows that that you can unlock it with facial recognition.  Sounds pretty neat right?  I think it’s a bad idea.  The first iPhones could be unlocked with a password.  Then they had the iPhones that could be unlocked only with a person’s thumbprint.  Now they come out with phones with facial recognition.  It seems to me they are slowly collecting data on everyone.  I also would tell people to beware of these DNA tests that have become popular in the last few years.  Companies like MyHeritage,23andMe,AncestryDNA and Living DNA are not always accurate.  Just be mindful when using them.  I have a funny feeling they are collecting the DNA of people and studying their genes.  Who knows?  They could use your DNA to create a disease that only attacks people with certain DNA strands.

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So I just want to know your thoughts.  Do you think we need to go underground?  How can you have a movement without racist government agencies(FBI,CIA) watching your every move?  I know some people who have left Youtube because of all the restrictions.  Then there are others who have stopped blogging at WordPress due to frustration.  Some of our people feel so beat down and they’ve decided to give up.  I get frustrated just like anyone else.  I’ve thought about leaving WordPress and Youtube at times. Trying to wake people up can get very tiring and it starts to wear on you. It’s not that I want to give up it’s just I want some practical solutions. I want our people to be free mentally and physically.  And it seems black people don’t want to change.  Not all…..but too many of us.

Bloggers..

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Do we need our own social media?  I have heard black people mention sites like Blaqspot.com.  And the conscious black dating site Kemet Klique.  I don’t know if they are totally 100% Black operated.  If someone knows please tell me.  I still need to do research on these black social media sites.  But I’m asking all my fellow bloggers.  I know I have a lot of intelligent subscribers.  I know some of you have some great ideas.  So I’m asking Onitaset,Land of Kam,Hung Like Jesus,Negress,Cree,Shelby Courtland,Trojan Pam,Kelley,CC Saunders,Amos Magazine,OriginalBlackWoman,TruthAngel,BlackMyStory,Melanin Man,Lumumba Afrika,Sparks,1TawnyStranger,King Lo the Rastar,Kween Jasira,Malaika Mutere,Sunny Delyte,Clifford Green,M’Bwebe Ishangi,Roshumba Monique,FourthAngelsBowl,Moorbey,Nidotopian Warrior,Universal Jones and Tired Sista for your thoughts.  I’m open to any suggestions.  Should we leave YouTube and WordPress?  If we do,how do we communicate with each other?  Should we do it through email?  I ask because we need our own private spaces to communicate without outside interference. We are all being watched at every turn.   maybe we need to move in silence like ninjas. Any black person on social media that is trying liberate the minds of our people are seen as a threat. They don’t seem to care if you’re a Moor,Pan African,Hebrew Israelite or into Kemetic spirituality. All that matters is you’re trying to inform the black collective and open minds. They draw strength from our confusion.  Confusion is the enemy to revolution. We need some real solutions.  I’m open to hear anything at this point.  I’d love to hear your suggestions.

 

Oshun-Sango

No pressure, you don’t have to love me
Just give me some time, just make me feel lucky
When you lay with me night
And when the sun comes up to meet the light
You say that you don’t care
I’m big enough to handle it
Just play in my hair and kiss me while the candles lit
Your secrets safe with me and I won’t tell
I don’t mind if you hurt me it’s my own fault that I fell
And I tell myself I need you, but you don’t feel the same
And double standards taught me I should let you play the game
But I’m not ashamed of playing the fool
Just call me beautiful
You tell me things like you’ll leave her when we both know that’s not true
And make promises of the things we both know you won’t do
Boy it’s cool, I’ll crumble alone
And you gone live your life and only fuck when in the zone
And yeah you make me moan
I put you on a throne; you won’t pick up your phone
But baby you make me feel grown
So I persist to give you everything you want
Even though you kept it real with me and you been blunt
Saying that we won’t be together and this is only lust
And never equals never
I’m on the same page as you
There’s nothing that I can explain to you
To show you why

Oshun...

I just keep on giving
I cannot keep living for you
Got my mind spinning round
You gon’ let me drown
But I’m sick of falling
I wanna rise to love
Rise to love
Rise

(Verse 2)
A weak woman goes where she is smiled at
But I’ve never seen a smile quite like yours
Said he loves me, he loves me not
Well he’s not sure but he knows he wants me
Yeah he said I’m making him hot hot hot
And so I let him take my top off
I don’t know thinking maybe things will pop off
Or sparks from the physical signals to his mental for a certain type of spiritual relationship
But, he just want the rhythm of my hips
Placing seldom kisses upon my lips
You know that quick fix satisfaction
Bridging to nowhere, a fatal attraction
Like whoa there, why did we go there so fast?
We knew that purely matter never ever last
Now morning glass outside looking in
While your bragging bout my ass to your friends
And I know this all begins with my issues with men
That’s why

(Chorus 2)
I keep on defending
The fact that I’m depending on you
I know it’s true that
A weak woman goes where she is smiled at
But I’ve never seen a smile quite like yours
Whether you love me or love me not
I’ll adore you forever more

(Chorus 1)
And I’ll just keep on giving
I cannot keep living for you
Got my mind spinning round
You gon’ let me drown
But I’m sick of falling
I wanna rise to love
Rise to love
Rise

Terrorism on Black children: Do we need our own Black Militia?

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Did you hear about this?  A fifteen year old black girl was raped on Facebook live!  And people watched this and did nothing!  This is disgusting!  This is heartbreaking to say the least.  Then when you think of the multiple black girls missing in Washington D.C. it makes matters much worse. I know a lot of are frustrated right now.  We have to protect our children at all costs.  They are being kidnapped for organ harvesting or being sex slaves.  The possibilities are endless.  We can’t let our babies be taken like this.  It got me thinking if we need our own black militia groups.  Maybe we need some type of black neighborhood watch across the country.  We actually need it worldwide to be honest.  But we need some type of organization from the grassroots level. And we need to expose any black person helping our enemies hurt our children.  We need a code of conduct of in the black community.  If you harm black children…you deserve DEATH!  Whether you are a black man or woman for that matter.  You are a traitor and must be dealt with harshly.  We need the black warriors to stand up now.  We can’t always rely on the police.  We can give information to authorities if we have it.  But we all know the police come after the fact.  They show up after the incident is over.  Which is we have to do some things on our own.  We need to be properly trained on firearms.  On how to use guns,knives and self defense tactics.  We need our entire families trained in survival.

Cure Racism....

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Warrior Anthem...

Do you think it’s important that black people know self defense?  Should it be taught to our children?  Do we need our own black neighborhood watch?  Something needs to be done?  We can’t just stand by and watch our children be raped and killed and do nothing.  We have to protect them no matter what.  Even at the cost of our own lives.  I’m open to any ideas and suggestions.  I would love to hear your thoughts on this urgent issues.

Marchelle Tigner

Marchelle Tigner...

Marchelle Tigner is beautiful but deadly.  This beautiful sista is not to be messed with!  Tigner is a certified firearms instructor. She lives in Savannah,Georgia.  She trains black women on how to shoot guns and rifles correctly. She is doing a great service in teaching self defense to the community.   Her business is called Trigger Happy Firearm Instruction. So I salute Marchelle!  For helping our community step up our self defense game!  Much respect from me!

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Ana Nzinga Mbande-Queen of Angola

NPG D34632; Ann Zingha by Achille DevÈria, printed by  FranÁois Le Villain, published by  Edward Bull, published by  Edward Churton, after  Unknown artist

In the 16th century, Portuguese slave traders turned to the Congo and southwest Africa, after their stake in the slave trade was threatened by England and France in the northern part of the continent. Their most stubborn opposition came from an unexpected source: an Angolan queen who ruthlessly maneuvered her way into power, fought off the slavers for decades, and, rumor has it, immolated her lovers.

Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba, also known as Nzinga Mbandi, Anna Nzinga, and Rainha Ginga, was born in 1583 to the king of Ndongo, a kingdom of the Mbundu people in modern-day Angola. The story goes that Nzinga was so named because she was born with her mother’s umbilical cord wrapped around her neck, and the Mbundu word for “to twist” is kujinga (an alternate spelling of Nzinga is “Njinga”). This circumstance was believed to indicate that the child would grow to be proud and haughty.

The king, Ngola Kiluanji, allowed Nzinga and his son, Ngola Mbandi, to witness his governance of the kingdom, which included numerous guerrilla raids against Portuguese invaders who were trying to infiltrate the territory. His children, as a result, grew up with a sharp understanding of the horrific implications of Portuguese colonization, which depended on slavery to expand its reach and riches.

According to Joseph C. Miller’s Nzinga of Matamba in a New Perspective, Nzinga first appears in the historical record in 1622, when she arrived in Luanda as the emissary for her brother, the ruler at the time. He had been dedicating all of his efforts and forces to keeping the Portuguese out of the highlands east of Luanda. During her visit, Nzinga converted to Christianity, and was baptized as Ana de Souza, a fact that would help her in her later negotiations with the Portuguese. Within two years of his sister’s visit to Luanda, Ngola Mbandi had died under unknown circumstances, and Nzinga had staked her claim as ruler of the kingdom.

Though Nzinga was about to revolutionize diplomatic relations between the Portuguese and the Mbundu state, she seized her title with great opposition from the internal political factions in the kingdom. The 17th-century Mbundu kingdom was made up of a hierarchy of linked political titleholders each with their own followings. After Ngola Mbandi’s death, the king’s title would normally have gone to the leader with a combination of the most number of followers and the most deft political maneuvering.

“The scant evidence available on Nzinga’s place in this general structure indicates that her claim to the royal title of the ngola a kiluanje violated established Mbundu norms,” writes Miller. “The Mbundu harbored strong feelings against females assuming any political title and explicitly prohibited any woman from assuming the position of the ngola a kiluanje.”

Initially, the Portuguese did not recognize Nzinga as the rightful ruler of the Mbundu people, either; they suspected that she was somehow implicated in her brother’s death and refused to honor her right to succeed him. They instead assumed that the heir apparent to the Mbundu throne was Ngola Mbandi’s son.

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As a result, Nzinga was forced to turn to support from outside the state: from a band of Imbangala warriors who inhabited the borders of the Mbundu kingdom and had expressed hostility against both Mbundu and Portuguese armies in the past. She also offered asylum to slaves escaping from Portuguese territories, eventually recruiting them as manpower.

The Imbangala in particular were crucial to increasing Nzinga’s position in domestic politics. Not only were they notorious for their fierce ways and highly effective war strategies, they did not have the same hierarchical structure as the Mbundu and frequently recognized women under the title of tembanza: a leader in both war and politics. Nzinga manipulated the Imbangala’s readiness to accept a kinless woman as their leader by assuming the tembanza position in a group of Imbangala lead by the kaza, one of the most powerful warlords in the region.

The Mbundu recognized Nzinga’s situation with the kaza as a marriage of sorts, and so did the Portuguese. According to Miller, Nzinga then used the kaza to help her kill her brother’s son, the heir apparent, in an effort to secure her position as the leader of the Mbundu. However, eventually the Imbangala left Nzinga and defected to the Portuguese due to her lack of Imbangala ancestry. By 1629, Nzinga was left without allies, with the Portuguese army in hot pursuit.

She fled to the old Mbundu kingdom of Matamba, a safeground that had in recent years been ravaged by Portuguese and Imbangala raids. In the 16th century, Matamba had flourished under the rule of several queens, although they had long since ceded rule to Nzinga’s father, Ngola Kiluanji, and later her brother. The disarray after his death and the various raids had created a political vacuum which Nzinga was quick to fill, using their willingness to accept female rulers to buttress her position as leader of the Mbundu.

Nzinga increased her wealth, her armies and her power by blocking Portuguese access to slave trade routes and diverting the slaves into Matamba. She continued to resist Portuguese troops well into her 60s, and it is said that she would wear male dress and lead her armies into battle herself.

Legends of Nzinga extend outside of her brilliant military tactics and political strategy. In Philosophy in the Boudoir, the Marquis de Sade wrote that Nzinga “immolated her lovers,” obtaining a large, all-male harem after she became queen and having each man she slept with killed after their carnal encounter. Though there is no way of knowing if there is truth to these rumors, there is no denying Nzinga was a ruthless ruler, unafraid of sacrificing men who came in her way.

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In 1657, at the age of 74, Nzinga entered peace treaty talks with the Portuguese, after having fought and been worn down by colonial and slave raiding attacks for decades. After conceding much of her power, Nzinga devoted her efforts to rebuilding her war-torn nation. Following her death in 1663, the Portuguese lost their most valiant opposition and were able to accelerate their colonial occupation.

As Donald Burness points out in “Nzinga Mbandi” and Angolan Independence, up until the 20th century, not much had been written by African writers on historical African revolutionaries. But during Angola’s fight for independence from the Portuguese in the 1970s, an MPLA leader named Manual Pacavira wrote a novel about Nzinga called Nzinga Mbandi while imprisoned by the Portuguese, drawing many parallels between her fight and the ongoing civil war.

“The spirit of Rainha Ginga is not dead; it serves as a source of inspiration and pride to a people and its leaders who face new challenges and new opportunities,” writes Burness. Angola is now independent, and a statue dedicated to Nzinga in Luanda serves as a tribute to one of the first people to have fought for its freedom.

Article written by Urvija Banjeri