Black Panther: Pan African Superhero?

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One of the problems with Black superheroes in Marvel and DC comics is that they may look Black, but very rarely do they reflect the experiences and struggles of Black people. This was a point that was made Kenneth Ghee who explained in Black Comics: Politics of Race and Representation that: “Historically in comic books and movies, the Black superhero operates in a totally Eurocentric (White) context; no Black family, no Black lover, no connection to community or culture…For him (and for us and our children) there is no Black consciousness or Black cause, only a generalized ‘humanitarian’ supportive role from a Eurocentric worldview and perspective.” Given that the Black Panther movie is set to be released next month, I would like to point out that one of the unique things about the Black Panther is that he is one Black superhero who has to confront many of the problems that Black people confront daily. The Black Panther doesn’t just live in Africa, he also lives many of the real problems that Africa has faced and continues to face. Black Panther comics are filled with themes of Western imperialism, colonialism, and neo-colonialism in Africa. These themes are especially prominent in the six episode cartoon series which was an adoption of Reginald Hudlin’s run of the comics.
In the comics Wakanda is the most technologically advanced country in the world because the people of Wakanda are able to utilize their country’s resources for their own benefit. Wakanda was the only African country never to be colonized or conquered, so it did not suffer through the ravages of the slave trade and colonialism which disrupted Africa’s development and, as Walter Rodney explained, underdeveloped Africa. Some have defended colonialism by arguing that colonization was a benefit to Africa because it introduced European technology, but this was not entirely the case. The technology that was introduced was utilized in the service of European domination in Africa. The vast majority of colonized Africans were exploited and impoverished, and they did not benefit from European technology in any significant way.

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Ethiopia was able to fend off the Italian invasion and under Menelik II’s rule Ethiopia made many technological advances, including establishing a railway, a postal service, and the country’s first hospital. This was because without European domination Ethiopia was free to adopt European technology and apply it in ways that were beneficial to their country, but the other colonized African nations did not have this benefit. Whereas Menelik was able to establish a hospital, in many colonies Africans were malnourished and given inadequate medical care. In Mozambique the Portuguese failed to train a single African doctor and Guinea-Bissau was even more neglected by the Portuguese colonialists than Mozambique was. Julius Nyerere, the first president of Tanzania, once explained that by the time Tanzania gained its independence the country only had 12 doctors. Wakanda presents us with a glimpse of where Africa could have been had it not been for colonialism, as well as a glimpse of where Africa could very well be with the proper leadership.
Comic book superheroes are typically people who decide to become superheroes due to personal tragedy or by obtaining superheroes, but the Black Panther is unique in that he has inherited his role as a superhero. T’Challa comes from a long dynasty of Black Panthers that have protected Wakanda for thousands of years. The Black Panther does fight the typical super villains that are found in comics, but what makes this character unique for people of African descent is that the Black Panther also fights a threat that Africans had to fight in real life, which is European colonization. For example, one story in Hudlin’s run depicts one of T’Challa’s ancestors defending his nation against an assault led by a European settler known as Klaue. In the story Klaue is a soldier who fought military campaigns in South Africa and has nothing but contempt for Africans, whom he views as uncivilized savages.

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T’Challa’s own story is rooted in Africa’s struggle against neo-colonial forces. T’Challa’s father, T’Chaka, was murdered for refusing to give up Wakanda’s most valuable resource, which is a fictional metal known as vibranium. In Hudlin’s retelling of the story, T’Chaka’s assassination was part of a plot that was carried out by various Western countries that were unable to talk T’Chaka into giving them his country’s resources. When they realized that T’Chaka could not be bought off, their next option was to simply kill him. This brings to mind the assassinations of Patrice Lumumba, Thomas Sankara, and other African leaders who were killed or overthrown by Western countries for refusing to serve the interests of those countries. T’Challa ascends to the throne and has to remain cautious about the fact that the very governments that assassinated his father would be plotting to do the same to him.
Aside from the Western governments that seek to undermine Wakanda to exploit its wealth, the Black Panther also has to confront African dictators such as M’Butu, who is one of the antagonists in the cartoon series. M’Butu is the dictator of a nation that borders Wakanda and he is depicted as being the opposite of T’Challa. M’Butu is greedy, self-serving, and is easily paid off like many of the dictators that continue to rule Africa today. M’Butu is also a close American ally and even agrees to participate in a plot to overthrow the Black Panther. Black Panther not only fights to protect his nation against European invaders, but against African traitors as well.
I am not sure how deeply the movie will delve into these themes. The anti-colonialist message found in the cartoon series and some of the comics was toned down when the Black Panther was introduced in Captain American: Civil War. In that movie T’Chaka’s assassination was part of a plot to frame the Winter Soldier rather than being an assassination that was carried out because T’Chaka refused to give up his country’s resources. Even if the anti-colonialist message is toned down, I still think the significance of the Black Panther movie is that it’s a movie that will challenge some of the ways Africa and African people are typically depicted in the mainstream media. It is also significant in that it has a message that is relevant to all people of African descent. For African Americans and others in the diaspora it is a reminder that there is more to our history that slavery, and for those on the African continent it is a reminder of the great potential that Africa has.

Article by Dwayne Omowale

Nat Turner, Solar Eclipse on August 21:Pay homage to the Great Ancestor

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This coming Monday will be a solar eclipse.  They don’t happen too often in the western part of the world.  But this is a special one in particular.  It will be on August 21 which is the day of the slave revolt by the great prophet Nat Turner.  This would be the 186 year anniversary of the revolt. With all the racial tension created by the mainstream media I can feel the tension around me. And our racist President is not helping the matter.  There are a lot of racial films out right now as well.  As well as the boxing match between Mayweather and McGregor which will fan more racial flames.  Watching the news can get you angry and upset.  Especially  when watching protests and marches by white supremacists.  But this is how the media controls you through your emotions.  Many black people are being manipulated emotionally.   It’s time to calm down,relax for a moment and think clearly. I think during this eclipse we should do some type of ritual in honor of the Black God Nat Turner.  Maybe pour libation or whatever you feel like doing.  But we need to harvest our energy and use the power given to us by our African ancestors.  We must always give the utmost respect to those that fought and gave the ultimate sacrifice against this wicked,racist and corrupt system.  Ashe’

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Pan African Proclamation of 2016

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Hotep family! It’s your brother KP.  I hope everyone is doing well.  I enjoyed my little break from posting. I thought this would be a good post for my return. Here at Kushite Kingdom I have always promoted  the idea of being Pan African. As well as covering topics like Black consciousness,economics,African culture and Black liberation. In exposing the lies that we are told about our history, I’ve tried my best to wake up my people. Many of us get so much disinformation in the media we are very confused.  That’s why I do my best to get out important information to my people. Even if I offend other races in the process. Offending people is not my concern.   If I was scared to offend others I would’ve stop blogging a long time ago.The survival of my people is my main concern.  I have always believed  that black consciousness was a spiritual path based on health,wellness amd knowledge of self. Black consciousness is appreciation for our African heritage,our people and families. And real  power is about determination and self control.  You can call this a proclamation,manifesto,mission statement or public declaration.  But I just wanted to list some ideas and things we as black people should be doing if we want to survive as well as change our mindset.  We have a lot of work ahead of us.  But together we can do this.  I’m sure some of you will like some of it…and others will disagree.  But that’s okay. I’m open to any suggestions anyone may have.

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  1. Promote Black Love
  2. Reject ideologies that have European origins
  3. Do not celebrate European holidays(White Gods)
  4. Learn a trade or skill to empower your people
  5. Teach African culture and Black History to your children. And how it can be used as an instrument of Power
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6. Study biology and genetics. Learn about your African bloodline.
7.Accept the harsh reality that biracial people are not black
8.Realize that you must sacrifice so that others can be free
9. To live with honor and integrity
10. Must understand that healing means we no longer allow trauma to control our lives
11. Do not engage in sexual activity with non-blacks
12. Stand for justice and equality
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13. Learn about great African heroes such as Marcus Garvey,Nat Turner,Queen Nzinga,Shaka Zulu,Thomas Sankara,Steve Biko,Harriet Tubman,Dutty Boukman,Patrice Lumumba,Martin Delany,Edward Blyden,Alexander Crummel,Assata Shakur,Mansa Musa,Malcolm X and Jean Jacques Dessalines. Appreciate their greatness but also learn from their mistakes.
14. Read The Blueprint for Black Power by Amos Wilson(then get all his books)
15. Read The Destruction of Black Civilizations by Chancellor Williams(then get all his books)
16. Read books by black scholars such as John Henrik Clarke,Queen Afua, Kwame Ture,Marimba Ani,Jewel Pookrum,Dr Sebi,Umar Johnson,Llaila Afrika,Bobby E.Wright …among others.
17. Reject European standards of beauty and uplift African Beauty
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18.Trust your ancestors and your instincts
19. Support Black businesses
20.Learn how to fish and hunt
21.Grow your own food
22.Learn to speak and write an African language
23.Learn how to read a map and use a compass
24.  Don’t be violent towards black homosexuals,transgenders and lesbians. Live and let live.  But realize that it is not conducive behavior for African people.
25.Understand that homosexuality,bestiality,lesbianism and pedophilia is sexual perversion.
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26. Do not be slut or whore.  It is very self destructive  and shows your immaturity. This applies to women….and men.
27. Assume that all non-blacks do not have your best interest in mind.
28. Brothers: Do not display a misogynistic mindset. Hating and despising black women shows ignorance and no growth as a man.  You must learn to respect your woman. Let sistas express themselves although it is okay to disagree at times. But give sistas their space.
29. Sistas: Do not be a man hating feminist.  Do not put down or degrade your man. Use words of encouragement to uplift your man.  And realize that men want to be leaders. Every gender has their role and should compliment the other gender.  A relationship is a partnership that both can benefit from.
30.  You must realize that the masculine principle  and feminine principle compliment one another. And that black men and women must work together to strengthen the family unit.