Empress AK


Some of you may not be familiar with this Jamaican queen. But this gorgeous woman is Empress AK.  She is not only beautiful but also an intelligent,Afrocentric and outspoken black  woman. As well as being a successful businesswoman.  Here is her bio from her website:

EmpressAK is an amalgamation of righteousness, sagacity, recklessness, wit and a dash of spice; the perfect dichotomy. In fact, everyone has a bit of EmpressAK (balance) in them, some not cognizant of it, others afraid to truly express it. The aim of this site is to provide a platform where anyone can weigh in on a plethora of topics from cultural, social, personal. These topics are packaged in different forms; thought provoking to humorous. Let’s build, laugh, learn!

Weh di scene? (what’s up?) I’m Alli “Ak” Slater. I was wondering if I should enumerate all of my accomplishments, credentials, birthplace, and talk in the third person but let’s be real, this isn’t a eulogy or cover letter, I’m alive with a job (praise God). Actually, all of those things doesn’t and shouldn’t matter here. Just know I am unapologetically Afro-Caribbean, I love controversial dialogue, a good laugh, and will always say what is on my mind, and of course if you are dying to know more, ask me. I am constantly learning about myself, culture and those around me. Join thee on this journey! 


I’m Pro-Black but….I date non-blacks??

Black Prince and....What..

Don’t laugh at that picture above.  This so-called proud African man actually married that creature.  I know it’s hard to believe. This is a subject that shouldn’t even  have to be addressed.  But it seems to be a bit of a problem in the conscious community.  It would seem that if a person is pro-black and race conscious that they would want to marry a black person.  So it would seem. But we have these people some refer to as Fake Hoteps,that are making the truly conscious look bad.  I have even seen it with black conscious black women too.  They have on their African clothing,wearing braids or dreadlocks….and holding the hand of a white man!  This is absolutely insane in my mind!

Pro Black but1...

I even had some fool that told me this is not a contradiction.  This is a major contradiction.  If you love your African culture,love your heritage…it would be natural to want to be with a black person.  You would want to pro create with a black person.  Why would you want to dilute your bloodline with another race?  It makes no sense.  If you love yourself and how you look..why would you want children that don’t look like you? This is not about hating another race either.  This is about self love and loving your own people.

This is a good video(above) by Pharaoh Allah. He speaks about all the pitfalls to dating white people.  While he is a bit animated at times I agree with his overall point.  And why it doesn’t help the black community in the long run.  Many of these fake dudes talk about black power but it’s all just an act. If you’re going to talk about it  then  you need to BE about it!  I’m tired of all these contradictions in our community.  And this also goes for people using the excuse of  “people of color” so they can marry Hispanics and Asians.  I’m well aware of this ongoing trend.


This picture(above) looks ridiculous!  What is this white man doing in African clothing?  He looks like a damn fool!  But this is the type of silliness and confusion that happens when we date/marry other races. It doesn’t matter if the person is Mexican,Chinese,Filipino,Cuban or Japanese.  If they are NOT a black person and you claim to be pro-black…you are full of crap!  You’re a walking contradiction.  And you make the rest of us(real conscious) look bad.  And we get lumped in the same group of disingenuous conscious people.  And I’m sick of it.  If you want to date/marry other races then just do it.   Go make some mixed babies and go on with your life.  But no more of this stupid ass fence riding. And please  stop saying you’re conscious,pro black or a Pan Africanist….because it’s obvious you are not.  Peace.

Menticide: Conversations in Black Self Hatred


“The controllers of this society have made use of psychological warfare to erode and destroy the will and mind of Black people. This is menticide pure and simple. Once the victims discover the truth, we are forced to change our lives. But, the victim fears change because the victim doesn’t know where that change will take him or her. Indeed we fear the unknown. The victim seeks to deny but denial of this reality is problematic because the victim is reminded everyday. The victim is caught in an internal double bind, damned if they don’t, damned if they do.”- Olomenji, From an essay entitled Mentacide, Genocide and National Vision: The Crossroads for the Blacks of America.


A few weeks ago I was talking with a friend of mine about self hatred. She told me that she has heard anti-black comments from family and friends.  I  have also heard comments from family as well as co-workers that reek of self hatred.  So I decided I would share some cooments I’ve heard over the last ten years.   I’ve heard some really ignorant comments from black co-workers. These are just a few short conversations I’ve had.

Example #1

I was eating lunch in the break room with  a black male co-worker. There’s no one else in the room but us two.

Co-worker:  Hey man,you ever screw a white girl?

Kushite:  No I haven’t.  I don’t really like them.

Co-worker: What??  That’s crazy man! You got to try a white girl at least once. I get tired of black women. Change it up a bit. It feels good giving  it to these white girls! (laughing)

Kushite:  No I’m good.  They’re not my thing.  I’m more attracted to black women. White girls do nothing for me. But you do what you want.( He just looked at me and shook his head in disbelief)

Self Hatred1..


Example #2

During a break I was talking with an African(Nigerian) co-worker.  I noticed a magazine on the desk.  As I flip through the magazine I see a picture of actress Lupita Nyongo.

Kushite: Now this is a beautiful woman!  She is truly stunning…don’t you think?

African woman:  Yes she’s kind of cute…not bad.  But you know where there are beautiful woman?  Have you heard of the Hausa tribe?

Kushite:  Yes I believe so.  Aren’t they a tribe in West Africa?

African woman:  Yes they are.  Many of them are so beautiful.  Many are very light skinned with thin lips.

Kushite:  So you’re saying they look white? Come on now!

African woman:  (very defensive)  No No!  Not what I meant.  I just mean they are very beautiful.  Light skinned with pointy noses and thin lips,you know?  That is all I meant.

Dark Skin...


Example #3

Two  co-workers (black men) were by a cubicle and talking.  I was a few feet away behind them.  They couldn’t see me. An African woman co-worker walked by them.  She was a very dark skinned woman.

Black man #1- Did you see how dark she was?

Black man #2- Good Lord! She was dark as night! (laughing)

Black man #1- Yeah she was left in the toaster oven too long! That’s too black!(laughing)

Black man #2-  Burnt to a crisp! (both men laughing)

As a side note,Black man #1 has a biracial daughter with a white woman. And is currently dating a Mexican woman.  He doesn’t even look at black women.  Black man #2 as a daughter with a black woman although they have since broken up.  He told me he is currently engaged to a mixed woman.  Mixed with what??  He told me she mixed with white and Mexican.  He even showed me a picture of this below average looking woman.  She looks pretty white to me.  Both of these “men” are pathetic examples of the black race.



These are just a few examples that come to mind.  Can you name an instance of black self hatred?  Or maybe a comment that someone may have made that sounds anti-black? Something insulting about nappy hair?  Or something degrading about skin color?  I’m sure you’ve heard these comments before.   I’d love to read your examples.


Ana Nzinga Mbande-Queen of Angola

NPG D34632; Ann Zingha by Achille DevÈria, printed by  FranÁois Le Villain, published by  Edward Bull, published by  Edward Churton, after  Unknown artist

In the 16th century, Portuguese slave traders turned to the Congo and southwest Africa, after their stake in the slave trade was threatened by England and France in the northern part of the continent. Their most stubborn opposition came from an unexpected source: an Angolan queen who ruthlessly maneuvered her way into power, fought off the slavers for decades, and, rumor has it, immolated her lovers.

Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba, also known as Nzinga Mbandi, Anna Nzinga, and Rainha Ginga, was born in 1583 to the king of Ndongo, a kingdom of the Mbundu people in modern-day Angola. The story goes that Nzinga was so named because she was born with her mother’s umbilical cord wrapped around her neck, and the Mbundu word for “to twist” is kujinga (an alternate spelling of Nzinga is “Njinga”). This circumstance was believed to indicate that the child would grow to be proud and haughty.

The king, Ngola Kiluanji, allowed Nzinga and his son, Ngola Mbandi, to witness his governance of the kingdom, which included numerous guerrilla raids against Portuguese invaders who were trying to infiltrate the territory. His children, as a result, grew up with a sharp understanding of the horrific implications of Portuguese colonization, which depended on slavery to expand its reach and riches.

According to Joseph C. Miller’s Nzinga of Matamba in a New Perspective, Nzinga first appears in the historical record in 1622, when she arrived in Luanda as the emissary for her brother, the ruler at the time. He had been dedicating all of his efforts and forces to keeping the Portuguese out of the highlands east of Luanda. During her visit, Nzinga converted to Christianity, and was baptized as Ana de Souza, a fact that would help her in her later negotiations with the Portuguese. Within two years of his sister’s visit to Luanda, Ngola Mbandi had died under unknown circumstances, and Nzinga had staked her claim as ruler of the kingdom.

Though Nzinga was about to revolutionize diplomatic relations between the Portuguese and the Mbundu state, she seized her title with great opposition from the internal political factions in the kingdom. The 17th-century Mbundu kingdom was made up of a hierarchy of linked political titleholders each with their own followings. After Ngola Mbandi’s death, the king’s title would normally have gone to the leader with a combination of the most number of followers and the most deft political maneuvering.

“The scant evidence available on Nzinga’s place in this general structure indicates that her claim to the royal title of the ngola a kiluanje violated established Mbundu norms,” writes Miller. “The Mbundu harbored strong feelings against females assuming any political title and explicitly prohibited any woman from assuming the position of the ngola a kiluanje.”

Initially, the Portuguese did not recognize Nzinga as the rightful ruler of the Mbundu people, either; they suspected that she was somehow implicated in her brother’s death and refused to honor her right to succeed him. They instead assumed that the heir apparent to the Mbundu throne was Ngola Mbandi’s son.


As a result, Nzinga was forced to turn to support from outside the state: from a band of Imbangala warriors who inhabited the borders of the Mbundu kingdom and had expressed hostility against both Mbundu and Portuguese armies in the past. She also offered asylum to slaves escaping from Portuguese territories, eventually recruiting them as manpower.

The Imbangala in particular were crucial to increasing Nzinga’s position in domestic politics. Not only were they notorious for their fierce ways and highly effective war strategies, they did not have the same hierarchical structure as the Mbundu and frequently recognized women under the title of tembanza: a leader in both war and politics. Nzinga manipulated the Imbangala’s readiness to accept a kinless woman as their leader by assuming the tembanza position in a group of Imbangala lead by the kaza, one of the most powerful warlords in the region.

The Mbundu recognized Nzinga’s situation with the kaza as a marriage of sorts, and so did the Portuguese. According to Miller, Nzinga then used the kaza to help her kill her brother’s son, the heir apparent, in an effort to secure her position as the leader of the Mbundu. However, eventually the Imbangala left Nzinga and defected to the Portuguese due to her lack of Imbangala ancestry. By 1629, Nzinga was left without allies, with the Portuguese army in hot pursuit.

She fled to the old Mbundu kingdom of Matamba, a safeground that had in recent years been ravaged by Portuguese and Imbangala raids. In the 16th century, Matamba had flourished under the rule of several queens, although they had long since ceded rule to Nzinga’s father, Ngola Kiluanji, and later her brother. The disarray after his death and the various raids had created a political vacuum which Nzinga was quick to fill, using their willingness to accept female rulers to buttress her position as leader of the Mbundu.

Nzinga increased her wealth, her armies and her power by blocking Portuguese access to slave trade routes and diverting the slaves into Matamba. She continued to resist Portuguese troops well into her 60s, and it is said that she would wear male dress and lead her armies into battle herself.

Legends of Nzinga extend outside of her brilliant military tactics and political strategy. In Philosophy in the Boudoir, the Marquis de Sade wrote that Nzinga “immolated her lovers,” obtaining a large, all-male harem after she became queen and having each man she slept with killed after their carnal encounter. Though there is no way of knowing if there is truth to these rumors, there is no denying Nzinga was a ruthless ruler, unafraid of sacrificing men who came in her way.


In 1657, at the age of 74, Nzinga entered peace treaty talks with the Portuguese, after having fought and been worn down by colonial and slave raiding attacks for decades. After conceding much of her power, Nzinga devoted her efforts to rebuilding her war-torn nation. Following her death in 1663, the Portuguese lost their most valiant opposition and were able to accelerate their colonial occupation.

As Donald Burness points out in “Nzinga Mbandi” and Angolan Independence, up until the 20th century, not much had been written by African writers on historical African revolutionaries. But during Angola’s fight for independence from the Portuguese in the 1970s, an MPLA leader named Manual Pacavira wrote a novel about Nzinga called Nzinga Mbandi while imprisoned by the Portuguese, drawing many parallels between her fight and the ongoing civil war.

“The spirit of Rainha Ginga is not dead; it serves as a source of inspiration and pride to a people and its leaders who face new challenges and new opportunities,” writes Burness. Angola is now independent, and a statue dedicated to Nzinga in Luanda serves as a tribute to one of the first people to have fought for its freedom.

Article written by Urvija Banjeri

Jodie Turner-Smith

Jodie Smith...

Jodie Turner-Smith is a model/actress from Jamaica.  Here’s an interview she did recently:

How did you get your start in modeling?

JODIE: Interestingly enough, what pushed me to start modeling was an encounter I had in Pittsburgh. I was backstage with some friends of mine who worked with N.E.R.D at one of their shows and was introduced to Pharrell. At the time I was looking to pursue a career in writing and told him as such. He told me that I needed to be in front of a camera, and proceeded to call a friend of his who was in the industry. That moment wasn’t necessarily a “be all end all moment”, what struck me about it was that here was a perfect stranger so excited and insistent upon me pursuing this idea that I knew nothing about and never thought I could before. It inspired me to believe in myself. A month later, I moved to Los Angeles, walked into NEXT Model Management and booked my first job, a Levi’s campaign.

How is acting different from modeling?

JODIE: I think that anyone who models understands that being in front of the camera requires a bit of acting. In so many ways, you’re playing a role, though it is definitely a simplified version of what you do on a stage or screen. With acting, the role you play isn’t about selling a product, and you have the chance to be much more creative. There is so much more preparation that goes into it and into creating your interpretation of the character that has been written. With modeling, you can get away with just being a silent pretty face. When you’re acting, you have to be more than that.


As a writer in addition to being a model, do you feel it gives you a unique perspective on fashion?

JODIE: Writing has been my outlet for as long as I can remember and it precedes my identity as a model–which basically means that before I was told I could make a living by appearing “attractive”, I was just an awkward book-worm crafting stories that came from the world inside my head. Actually, I’m still an awkward book-worm crafting stories that come from the world inside my head! I think that aspect of me gives me a perspective that is equal parts cerebral and creative. It is also gives me a unique ability to commit all of the colorful characters and experiences I’ve encountered to a very humorous story in the book I’ll write when I get older!

What was your experience on True Blood like?

JODIE: I’m still reeling from that fact that my first acting experience was on one of my favorite shows! While getting covered in fake blood from head to toe wasn’t the most comfortable costume, I had such an amazing time working on the show. Stephen Moyer is a great actor and director, and he directed the first episode that I did. He was also the only character throughout the season who could see my character, so the aspect of haunting him in a sense was a really fun role to play! I don’t know how my poor dad is gonna react to me being a naked vampire, but it hasn’t aired yet in the UK, so I’ve got time to break it to him!