Ama K. Abebrese

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Ama K. Abebrese was born May 3, 1980. She  is an award-winning British Ghanaian actress, television presenter and producer. She was born in Ghana and raised in West London in the United Kingdom. She won the 2011 Best Actress in a Leading Role at the AMAA Awards for her stellar performance in Sinking Sands. Her film credits includes the Netflix movie Beasts of No Nation directed by Cary Fukunaga and stars Idris Elba. She plays the mother to lead young actor Abraham Attah who plays Agu. Abebrese is listed among Africa’s Top 20 Actors and Actresses by FilmContacts.com. She was named among C Hub magazine’s 100 most influential  African Women Influencers’ of the era 2014/15. She was ranked the Number 1 Most Influential TV and Radio Host 2015 on the Ghana Social Media Rankings List.

She is an accomplished television presenter, having started hosting TV shows in her teens on YCTV in London, she has presented on BBC2, OBE TV, Viasat 1, TV3, Ebonylife TV and many more.

Abebrese started her training at YCTV (Youth Culture Television) in London, an organization started by Sabrina Guinness on the TV show Challenge Anneka. She was a presenter on BBC2 youth show Pass da Mic and a guest presenter on the English File educational series. She developed a love for acting after joining the Lyric Theatre (Hammersmith) Summer Company as a youth. Abebrese was a regular TV presenter on the now defunct OBE TV in London, hosting and producing on a number of shows including One Touch, and the entertainment chat show On The Sofa, where guests she has interviewed range from Akon to Ziggy Marley. She has interviewed the likes of Harrison Ford, Ne-Yo, Rihanna, and Star Wars director George Lucas among notable others.

Her film credits include the international multiple award-winning film Sinking Sands, directed by 2011 BAFTA LA and Pan African Film Festival prize winner Leila Djansi. The film received 12 nominations at the 2010 Ghana Movie Awards, including “Best Actress in a Leading Role”, the film won four awards, including “Best Film”. Others film credits are Revele film’s Elmina and London Get Problem. She starred and co-produced the movie Double-Cross, which won two awards for “Best Cinematography” and “Best Hair and Make Up” at the 2015 Ghana Movie Awards.

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She is the former Head of Own Productions at Viasat 1 television station in Ghana.She was the host of A Day in the Life TV show which aired on Viasat 1; she co hosted New Day on TV3 weekday mornings.In 2013, Abebrese alongside Nollywood actress Dakore and comedian Ayo Makun hosted the 2013 edition of the AMAA Awards.

 

Sarah Nakintu

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This gorgeous beauty is Sarah Nakintu. She has her own line of luxury handbags.

Here’s an interview she recently did:

Who is Sarah Nakintu?

Sarah Nakintu: I moved to the U.S. in 2005 for higher education and to explore something a little bit outside Kampala, where I’d been born and raised. When you grow up with African parents, it can be a challenge to do what you want. I always loved fashion and I wanted to do fashion from when I was really young, but my parents were all about school. You know, go to school, get an education, and be like a lawyer or something.

I think New York just opened my eyes so much to people doing what they love and people hustling and trying to get things done. With time, I just thought maybe I can really do what I love as opposed to doing something that my parents wanted me to do.

What drew you to fashion?

With fashion, you’re really able to bring out your imagination. I travel so much these days and every time I go to a place, I’m very inspired. I can see what New York looks like and look at cities like Milan. How do people there dress? I’m really interested in seeing how it all trickles down. How can something be a painting today and tomorrow it’s fully interpreted into a dress or a bag?

What was it like growing up in Uganda?

I grew up in boarding school, so I was very sheltered. Uganda is a religious country. You’re kind of expected to be a good person and go to church—do what your parents are telling you to do kind of thing. A lot of judgment as well, so you can’t disgrace your parents.

I remember my aunties and my sisters and my whole family would be like, ‘You know you’re too loud. You really need to tone it down.’ The only person, really, that was appreciative of me and who I was was my dad who encouraged me to be myself.

Yeah, I have definitely always been very interested in fashion. With or without money, it’s always been my thing.

What was the moment like when you told your family that you wanted to pursue fashion full-time?

I didn’t really tell them. With things like this, it’s really better to go and do it and then once you’re successful or you’ve moved the needle a little bit, you can tell them. I think I’ve tried to tell them like, ‘Hey, I’m doing this handbag thing,’ and they’re like, ‘Oh, okay. Sure. Whatever.’ I have a lot of ideas, so I’m sure they were thinking, ‘Oh, that’s one of her crazy ideas.’ I didn’t get their blessing—I just went ahead and did it. That moment was scary for me because I had a full-time job and I was earning really well and in New York it’s hard to just give up a full-time job to go and do something where you have no idea if it’s going to succeed.

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How is Kintu African-inspired?

Often when you tell people that you’re doing something African-inspired, they’re expecting African pattern or African material or something like that—this is not necessarily what I wanted to do. I represent modern Africa and the different types of people that come out of our continent. There are so many ways to do African inspiration.

A lot of brands do African-inspired in a way that’s a bit overwhelming. I wanted to do a bag that you can take from morning to day to night. We wanted to do a luxury line that’s African-inspired. You know, very subtle but still there. The closure is the shape of a cow horn. If you’re East African or know about East African culture, the cow is very central to our subsistence. Animal print is actually completely African-inspired. We worked with African animals and we did it in a very modern manner, which it’s really, really interesting to a lot of buyers. It’s something that they’ve not seen before and they love it.

Why is sustainability important to you?

Our bags are made really well with long-lasting materials. You can pass them on to your children. I think that’s really important. There’s also sustainability in terms of where we make our bags and who we make them with. When we worked in India and Kenya, we’re paying a living wage. We pay artisans what they deserved as opposed to just saying just because you’re based in Kenya, we’re not going to pay you well.

That’s also important to me because remember, I’m African. Just being there and remembering the women in the market working really hard or the farmers that I grew up seeing or the tailor, that’s sewing. They work really hard. They groom and they grow and they hone their craft. We need to start paying them really well and recognizing their talent and taking it global. I feel really passionate about being able to bring those skills and then also create the next generation of artisans.

Degrading the beauty of Black Women-Trojan Pam

Lilian Uwanyuze..

In EVERY culture the mother is sacred; the “civilizer” of her culture, community, children, and society.

The black female is the CREATOR of all authentically black life. She is the FIRST TEACHER and her primary responsibility is to “civilize” the children by passing along the values and traditions of her culture to the next generation. The way the female sees herself will determine the way her offspring ultimately SEES, VALUES, and RESPECTS THEMSELVES.

When the white media degrades the black female’s physical features and moral character, they are DELIBERATELY devastating the self-esteem of the products of her WOMB: little black girls and boys who will one day grow up to be low-self-esteemed black men and women.

If the “Mother” of a nation is a worthless whore how can the products of her womb (her children) have any value?

Once the BLACK MOTHER (the black female) is so degraded and demoralized that she becomes “uncivilized,” she will not be able to civilize anyone else. As a result, her children, her men, her community, and the ENTIRE BLACK NATION will become demoralized, self-hating, self-disrespecting, and UNCIVILIZED. This lays the foundation for a ‘Manufactured Black Inferiority Complex’ that will last a lifetime.

Until blacks collectively understand the importance of protecting the IMAGE of the Black Mother of our Black Nation, we will continue reaping one damaged black generation after another.

Return of The Gods 2018-San Diego,Ca.(World Beat Center)

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Recently I got the chance to attend Return of The Gods.  It was held at the World Beat Center in San Diego,California. It was a fun filled three day event.  Over the course of three days they had a fashion show,yoga,martial arts demonstration and African dancers. They had rappers,singers and guest speakers.  It was really fun to meet a lot of the people in the black conscious community I’ve followed over the years.  Return of The Gods was created by the brilliant Kateria Knows. She wanted to create an event that would bring black people together in love and peace. And also raise the collective consciousness of black people.  We really need that right now. And I respect the fact that she’s putting forth the effort.  Not just talking about it but putting it in action.  I must give her a lot of props for that. The event was hosted by comedian Michael Colyar and Mama Funshine.  Colyar was cracking jokes a lot.  But he did keep it lively and kept the crowd involved. There were performances by rappers such as Sa-Roc,D Ranks,Sole,Herb Alkhemyst and conscious battle rapper BDOT. I also saw Ayanna Gregory,who is the daughter of the late comedian Dick Gregory. And I spoke with entrepreneur/radio host Six Goddis.  Six is a really cool sista. They also had special honorees as well. The renowned healer and author Queen Afua was honored.  I got a chance to chat with the elder.  I told her I had some of her books and have followed her for many years.   It was a pleasure to speak with her and her son.  I also spoke with author/health activist Chef Ahki.  She had a vendor booth selling her books and products. She has a great book called The Fibroid Elimination Recipe Guide.  I suggest any women that want to avoid fibroids purchase that book.  Also Booker T. Coleman was in attendance.  Some of you may remember him from the documentary Hidden Colors. Lecturer Michael Imhotep was also honored. He is the creator of the African History Network. I also saw rapper Lord Jamar from the legendary rap group Brand Nubian. And rapper Rah Digga was in attendance.  It was a really fun event.  I got to meet a lot of really cool and intelligent brothers and sisters.  There was definitely nourishment for the mind,body and soul.  I hope Kateria does it again next year.  I definitely would go!

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Return of The Gods creator Kateria Knows(pictured above) pulled off a great event.  Everyone had a great time.  She’s pictured here with her equally beautiful sister Sherina.

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