10 Signs to look for in Black Consciousness

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Over the years I’ve seen black people who were full of self hatred make a big change.  Some gain black consciousness through books or films.  But one thing  I’ve noticed is that black people who really change their consciousness is that their lifestyle changes as well.  As well as their opinions and world view.  Here’s a short list of some of the things I went through during the elevation of my own consciousness.  And things I’ve seen in others.  Feel free to list any things that come to your mind in the comment section.

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1.Many begin to have a stronger cultural pride. They may even change the way they dress or learn an African dialect.   They start to talk about black power and black unity a lot more.

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2. Many times their eating habits will change.  As they gather more information on a holistic health they will stop eating at fast food restaurants and eat more fruits and vegetables. They eat organic food over GMO poison.

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3.They will start to develop a thirst for knowledge.  They will want to learn as much as possible about black history,black heroes and all the great African civilizations.  Knowledge of self becomes very important.

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4.  After learning their true history they may become upset from the lies they were told by the “public fool system”.  They realize(real eyes) they have been manipulated. After doing extensive research they have become “awaken” and can see through the lies and propaganda from the racist media and Hollywood.

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5.  After much studying they learn to appreciate the beauty and power of their melanin.  They realized they are blessed to have sun-kissed skin and black genetics run through their veins.

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6.They no longer hate their natural African textured hair.  They now know their hair acts as an antenna.  They know they have 9 Ether cosmic hair while other races have fur.

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7.  Interracial marriage(swirling) begins to look strange to their eyes.  After realizing black power and unity are crucial….interracial couples look foreign to them.  They see that many of their people suffer from mentacide and don’t realize they are destroying themselves by mating with other races.

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8.  As their consciousness grows so does their maturity level.  They stop acting like little boys and girls and act like responsible men and women.  They desire to have meaningful loving connections with black people. No more one night stands and casual flings. Whores(male or female) are not truly conscious beings.

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9.  They begin to study herbal medicine.  They realize that hospitals aren’t in the business of curing people.  They now know that herbal immunity is better than deadly vaccines. And that hospitals are disease management.

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10.  They know that Black Love,black unity and self respect is of utmost importance. They also realize that black people are the true standard of beauty and we are the original people of the planet.  And the black man and woman need each other in this physical,spiritual and psychological war!

ACBN: A Primer by Kwesi Anan Ababio

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Afrikan Centered Biological Nationalism (ACBN): A Primer, seeks to examine what the author posits is the central problem in achieving Afrikan sovereign power. Namely, in answering the question, “Who is Afrikan?” More specifically, the book asks, “Whom exactly are we trying to liberate and/or empower?” This book hypothesizes that what is missing is a definition of who is Afrikan and using that definition as a basis for a viable and practicable social theory which all Afrikans, regardless of their location and political consciousness, can use to organize their behavior in the context of a politically and economically hyper-competitive world—a world which always has and continues to use culture and identity as the basis for social organization and group power. Afrikan Centered Biological Nationalism (ACBN) offers one such social-political theory for consideration. ACBN seeks to revitalize the discussion of Afrikan liberation and Black Power in a way which can achieve real political power for Afrikan people.

Elementary Genocide 3: Academic Holocaust

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This is part three to the Elementary Genocide Documentary series.  It’s a great film by producer Rahiem Shabazz.  I have part one and two.  They were both very educational. And this film looks just as good as the others. The film seeks to explore how the “Murder In The Streets, Same As Intellectual Murder In The Classroom”. The documentary features notables such as Prof. James Small, Kaba Keme, David Banner, Shahrazad Ali, Michael Imhotep and many more. Be sure to purchase it when it comes out.

http://elementarygenocide.com/

Once Upon a time in Afrika…

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Yes I know it’s hard to believe.  But we did have a history before we encountered Europeans or Arabs.  They don’t want you to remember that though.

Ana Nzinga Mbande-Queen of Angola

NPG D34632; Ann Zingha by Achille DevÈria, printed by  FranÁois Le Villain, published by  Edward Bull, published by  Edward Churton, after  Unknown artist

In the 16th century, Portuguese slave traders turned to the Congo and southwest Africa, after their stake in the slave trade was threatened by England and France in the northern part of the continent. Their most stubborn opposition came from an unexpected source: an Angolan queen who ruthlessly maneuvered her way into power, fought off the slavers for decades, and, rumor has it, immolated her lovers.

Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba, also known as Nzinga Mbandi, Anna Nzinga, and Rainha Ginga, was born in 1583 to the king of Ndongo, a kingdom of the Mbundu people in modern-day Angola. The story goes that Nzinga was so named because she was born with her mother’s umbilical cord wrapped around her neck, and the Mbundu word for “to twist” is kujinga (an alternate spelling of Nzinga is “Njinga”). This circumstance was believed to indicate that the child would grow to be proud and haughty.

The king, Ngola Kiluanji, allowed Nzinga and his son, Ngola Mbandi, to witness his governance of the kingdom, which included numerous guerrilla raids against Portuguese invaders who were trying to infiltrate the territory. His children, as a result, grew up with a sharp understanding of the horrific implications of Portuguese colonization, which depended on slavery to expand its reach and riches.

According to Joseph C. Miller’s Nzinga of Matamba in a New Perspective, Nzinga first appears in the historical record in 1622, when she arrived in Luanda as the emissary for her brother, the ruler at the time. He had been dedicating all of his efforts and forces to keeping the Portuguese out of the highlands east of Luanda. During her visit, Nzinga converted to Christianity, and was baptized as Ana de Souza, a fact that would help her in her later negotiations with the Portuguese. Within two years of his sister’s visit to Luanda, Ngola Mbandi had died under unknown circumstances, and Nzinga had staked her claim as ruler of the kingdom.

Though Nzinga was about to revolutionize diplomatic relations between the Portuguese and the Mbundu state, she seized her title with great opposition from the internal political factions in the kingdom. The 17th-century Mbundu kingdom was made up of a hierarchy of linked political titleholders each with their own followings. After Ngola Mbandi’s death, the king’s title would normally have gone to the leader with a combination of the most number of followers and the most deft political maneuvering.

“The scant evidence available on Nzinga’s place in this general structure indicates that her claim to the royal title of the ngola a kiluanje violated established Mbundu norms,” writes Miller. “The Mbundu harbored strong feelings against females assuming any political title and explicitly prohibited any woman from assuming the position of the ngola a kiluanje.”

Initially, the Portuguese did not recognize Nzinga as the rightful ruler of the Mbundu people, either; they suspected that she was somehow implicated in her brother’s death and refused to honor her right to succeed him. They instead assumed that the heir apparent to the Mbundu throne was Ngola Mbandi’s son.

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As a result, Nzinga was forced to turn to support from outside the state: from a band of Imbangala warriors who inhabited the borders of the Mbundu kingdom and had expressed hostility against both Mbundu and Portuguese armies in the past. She also offered asylum to slaves escaping from Portuguese territories, eventually recruiting them as manpower.

The Imbangala in particular were crucial to increasing Nzinga’s position in domestic politics. Not only were they notorious for their fierce ways and highly effective war strategies, they did not have the same hierarchical structure as the Mbundu and frequently recognized women under the title of tembanza: a leader in both war and politics. Nzinga manipulated the Imbangala’s readiness to accept a kinless woman as their leader by assuming the tembanza position in a group of Imbangala lead by the kaza, one of the most powerful warlords in the region.

The Mbundu recognized Nzinga’s situation with the kaza as a marriage of sorts, and so did the Portuguese. According to Miller, Nzinga then used the kaza to help her kill her brother’s son, the heir apparent, in an effort to secure her position as the leader of the Mbundu. However, eventually the Imbangala left Nzinga and defected to the Portuguese due to her lack of Imbangala ancestry. By 1629, Nzinga was left without allies, with the Portuguese army in hot pursuit.

She fled to the old Mbundu kingdom of Matamba, a safeground that had in recent years been ravaged by Portuguese and Imbangala raids. In the 16th century, Matamba had flourished under the rule of several queens, although they had long since ceded rule to Nzinga’s father, Ngola Kiluanji, and later her brother. The disarray after his death and the various raids had created a political vacuum which Nzinga was quick to fill, using their willingness to accept female rulers to buttress her position as leader of the Mbundu.

Nzinga increased her wealth, her armies and her power by blocking Portuguese access to slave trade routes and diverting the slaves into Matamba. She continued to resist Portuguese troops well into her 60s, and it is said that she would wear male dress and lead her armies into battle herself.

Legends of Nzinga extend outside of her brilliant military tactics and political strategy. In Philosophy in the Boudoir, the Marquis de Sade wrote that Nzinga “immolated her lovers,” obtaining a large, all-male harem after she became queen and having each man she slept with killed after their carnal encounter. Though there is no way of knowing if there is truth to these rumors, there is no denying Nzinga was a ruthless ruler, unafraid of sacrificing men who came in her way.

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In 1657, at the age of 74, Nzinga entered peace treaty talks with the Portuguese, after having fought and been worn down by colonial and slave raiding attacks for decades. After conceding much of her power, Nzinga devoted her efforts to rebuilding her war-torn nation. Following her death in 1663, the Portuguese lost their most valiant opposition and were able to accelerate their colonial occupation.

As Donald Burness points out in “Nzinga Mbandi” and Angolan Independence, up until the 20th century, not much had been written by African writers on historical African revolutionaries. But during Angola’s fight for independence from the Portuguese in the 1970s, an MPLA leader named Manual Pacavira wrote a novel about Nzinga called Nzinga Mbandi while imprisoned by the Portuguese, drawing many parallels between her fight and the ongoing civil war.

“The spirit of Rainha Ginga is not dead; it serves as a source of inspiration and pride to a people and its leaders who face new challenges and new opportunities,” writes Burness. Angola is now independent, and a statue dedicated to Nzinga in Luanda serves as a tribute to one of the first people to have fought for its freedom.

Article written by Urvija Banjeri