Harriet Tubman on the $20 Bill?-Naazir Ra

They want to put black hero Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. What does it mean?  Is this progress?  Does this mean black people are now accepted by the mainstream?  I sure as hell don’t think so.  Naazir Ra breaks down what this realize means.  And what it really symbolizes.  There’s a much deeper meaning behind it.

Harriet Tubman..

Whitewashing of the Black Woman’s Image

fSPerfect Match..

The film The Perfect Match comes out today. I saw the  trailer for this  so-called “black romantic comedy” last week. It stars Terrence J,Cassie Ventura,Lauren London,Paula Patton,Dascha Polanco and Donald Faison. It looks like your typical romantic comedy Hollywood usually gives us.  The acting is not very good and we’ve seen this storyline countless times before. But that’s not my problem with the film.

What’s very disturbing is this film is being pushed in the urban(black)markets.  It’s been all over BET,TV One and many black radio stations.  I found this disturbing because all the main women in the film are biracial women.  All the women that are supposed to be desirable are mixed/biracial women.  The main love interest is played by actress/singer Cassie Ventura.  She’s most known for being  music producer Sean Combs on again/off again girlfriend. She’s not that great of a singer to begin with so I guess she wants to take a chance at acting.  Apparently  she’s not that great of an actress either. But Cassie is not even a black woman.  Her father is Filipino. And her mother is Black and Mexican.  Then there’s actress Lauren London.  Who is most know from the film ATL(2006). She also is know for having a baby with wannabe gangster rapper Lil Wayne.  Does that make her baby mama number 5 or 6?  Who knows?  Any Lauren’s father is a Jewish man and her mother is black. And actress Dascho Polanco is a mixed race Dominican woman.  This is the same old promotion of the “exotic mixed race” woman.  Once again we see the elimination of the dark-skinned African looking woman.  They do this over and over again. How can you have a “black film” with no women that LOOK black?  This is another slap in the face to black women!  And another example of whitewashing the black woman’s image. I’ve covered this topic before a few months ago.

https://kushiteprince.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/biracial-women-are-the-most-beautifuland-other-myths/

And this issue of pushing biracial woman as a better alternative to black woman is disgusting.  It’s an insult to all the beautiful dark skinned sistas out there. But this promotion of biracial/whitewashing of black women has been on an upswing the last few years.

Nina Simone1..

But nothing is more insulting than the upcoming Nina Simone biopic.  The director of the film cast Zoe Saldana as Nina.  This was an insult right from the start. Zoe Saldana has a Dominican father and Puerto rican mother.  Her biography says she also has Hatian and Lebanese roots.  But Nina Simone was unapologetically black.  She was a dark skinned woman with full lips and African textured hair.  All her life Nina was called ugly and unattractive because she looked African.  Saldana can’t relate to that.  She may be of African descent but her life is not a reflection of what Nina endured. The way Nina was treated was part of her music. It was the embodiment of who she was as a black woman. Also the family of Simone has denounced the film and were not involved. If Saldana had any integrity she would’ve turned this film down.  The put dark makeup on her and gave her a fake nose.  What the hell??I know she wanted a paycheck but this role is horrible for her.  She is not right for this role.  Why not just hire a dark skinned actress who can also sing?  Why not Lauryn Hill or India Arie?  Either one of them  would’ve  been better choices in my opinion. And I’m sure Simone would not approve of this.  This is nothing but a modern day blackface minstrel!

This is an interesting video.  It’s a few black actresses in Hollywood giving their opinion on Zoe Saldana playing Nina Simone.  Most of them gave politically correct answers.  You can tell that they were very uncomfortable not wanting to admit that a more black looking woman should’ve gotten the role.  Although actress Sheryl Lee Ralph was probably the most honest.

Coretta Scott King..

This casting of biracial/mixed has been going on for quite awhile.  Biracial actress Carmen Ejogo was cast as Coretta Scott King twice. Once in the film Boycott(2001) and the film Selma(2014).

Harriet Tubman...

In the film Abraham Lincoln:Vampire Hunter(2012)biracial actress Jacqueline Fleming played black hero Harriet Tubman.  Fleming looks nothing like Tubman at ALL!! This was an insult to our great abolitionist hero!  This is an attack on the African looking woman and the destruction of her image.  Some may think this is a small issue. But I disagree totally.  The media is blatantly whitewashing the image of black women on purpose.

Lupita...1

And in may cases they will lighten the skin of an actress on a magazine cover. As in the case of Lupita Nyong’o on the cover of Dazed & Confused…among others.

Precious...

Kerry W...

8 Cases Where A Black Celebrity Was Whitewashed For A Magazine Cover or Ad Campaign

https://raceandtechnology.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/whitewashing-in-mass-media-exploring-colorism-and-the-damaging-effects-of-beauty-hierarchies/

Proud Black Woman

African Woman

This whitewashing has to STOP!  This is a disgrace to all African women. And I want sistas to know that there are millions of brothers that love and support you.  I have talked to black men who have told me that they reject this whitewashing of Hollywood.  They love their sistas and reject this false image the media throws at us. So sistas stand tall and proud! You do not have to be mixed and biracial to be beautiful. You are beautiful just the way you are.  Much love to you…and stay strong. ❤

 

The Secret Relationship between Blacks and Jews

Well packaged, the book contains 334 pages of fully documented text including 1,275 footnotes, from more than 3,000 sources. Most of the sources, if not all, were collected from Jewish historical literature.

As a research document, the book is not what you would call an easy read, however, with a fully annotated index, and clearly descriptive sections and subject titles, the book is surprisingly easy to navigate. The editors detailed clearly all references consistently linked by sparse journalistic narratives intended to enhance clarity while not distracting the reader from the information contained within.

One area of note is the abolitionist movement, of which Jewish scholars ostensibly claim membership. On page 147 the Historical Research Department clearly shows using Jewish sources, that those involved in the abolitionist movement were few, and those who did stand against the institution of slavery “were scorned and rebuked – most harshly by their own brethren in the synagogue.”

There is an additional point of interest identified through the research of the Historical Research Department. It is shown that those who did stand against the spread of slavery did so because of the threat it presented to their jobs and economic well being. This is a central difficulty and one that cannot be easily countered by the Jewish thought control organizations, since many who decried this book as anti-Semitic, cited the fact that Jews were apart of the abolitionist movement as a defense.

There is no denying that they were a part of the abolitionist movement. Similarly, there is no denying that members of the Jewish community were involved in the civil rights movement of the 1960’s, however, the motivation behind the involvement must be brought to light. Interestingly enough, their involvement appears motivated by self-interests and not compassion and concern.

In exhaustive detail, The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews provides geographic records beginning with the infamous Columbus voyages, and dealing with Jews and slavery in Brazil, Surinam, Barbados, Curacao and Jamaica. Jewish Slavery in Colonial North America, the South, and Jewish involvement in the Civil War.

Jewish court records, port records and wills of Jewish slave owners were used. The names of ships, their owners and in many cases, their cargo, were listed and presented in an easy to understand format. Not only is the information easy to read, but using Jewish sources also eliminates the accusation of fraud – unless of course the Jewish scholars maintain that their research in this matter is shoddy and fraudulent.

Given the volatility of the subject, it is obvious why a book approaching this area would be controversial, however as the number of those having read the book has grown over the years, it has produced in many areas, as the editor’s note stated “an opportunity to develop a more equitable relationship between the families of man.”

One of the most controversial books of the decade, this book is one that you must own in order to be considered, up to date and well-educated regarding historical realities. The scholarly treatment of this subject by the Historical Research Department is unmatched.