Why are Black men the face of the MeToo movement?

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Elvis Presley: King of Pedophiles?

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Amwerican singer Elvis Presley is labeled the “King of Rock and Roll”.  Even though black people invented rock and roll music.  Little Richard and Chuck Berry were more talented.  But that’s another subject.  There’s been a lot of talk about sexual predators during this witch hunt…Oops…  I mean MeToo movement.  But it seems that black men like Bill Cosby,Michael Jackson and R Kelly are getting the most press.  They went and found women from thirty years ago to testify against legendary comedian Bill Cosby. Then sent the old man to jail.  Then Twitter started a hashtag called MuteRKelly.  There’s a new documentary called Leaving Neverland about Michael Jackson.  The documentary interviews two white men who say Jackson molested them.  Jackson has been dead ten years and they come out with this now? Why??  He’s not here to defend himself.  Sounds like character assassination to me.  Or a money grab.  The reality is that Hollywood is full of rapists and pedophiles.  And black people are corrupt in that business as well.  But black people don’t control the mainstream media.  So when they make a deal with these demons for fortune and fame..the devil will collect!  If you do something they don’t like they can destroy you.  They can publicly destroy your image through television.  They can even frame you and send you to prison.

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MeToo1...There are many white men in Hollywood and the music industry who have had sex with children. None of them are saints.  But the media covers up for them.  Where is the documentary on Woody Allen?  What about Harvey Weinstein?  That’s Oprah Winfrey’s buddy.  I see Oprah had no problem doing the documentary about Michael Jackson.  But she’s silent on Harvey.  Jackson had his issues.  I believe he had self hate issues and worshipped whites too much.  But at least before his death he spoke out on the wicked people in the music industry. Oprah has shown her true colors.  She is nothing but a Hollywood mammy.  She and her lesbian lover Gayle King are tools for the white devils in Hollywood.  They both make me SICK!!!

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But why does Elvis get a pass?  He met his future wife Priscilla in 1959.  She was only fourteen at the time.  They had a romance until they got married in 1967 when she was twenty-two years old.  So let’s do the math here.  From the time she was fourteen and until they got married…did they have sex???  You know damn well they did!  So what’s the difference between him and R. Kelly? Didn’t Kelly marry Aaliyah when she was really sixteen?  So where’s the hashtag #MuteElvisPresley?   Jackson,Cosby and Kelly are not saints.  They are imperfect people and have their flaws.  But in a so-called justice system everyone should be treated the same.  But that’s not the reality we live in.  We live in a society controlled by Europeans Jews.  They own the mainstream media and control Hollywood and the music industry.  So don’t wait up for Oprah to make that Leaving Graceland documentary.  You might be waiting for a very long time.

US film review(spoilers) by C.C. Saunders

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In its contemporary context, blackness assumes a violent coupling. Filmmaker Jordan Peele (Get Out) tackles this coupling in both a literal and figerative sense with his latest release Us. Peele depicts humans as “coupled” by a being who mirrors their exteriority. In challenging the presumed singularity of identity, the coupled being obscures reality, simultanously inciting the following query: Are humans replaceable?
Well, according to the film’s doppelgängers, who wear red jumpsuits accessorised by gold scissors, the answer is yes. Viewers meet Adelaide (Lupita Nyong’o) as a child who goes to a mirror house and encounters a girl who looks exactly like her. After this encounter, Adelaide is never the same, and later viewers learn that Adelaide is never the same because she and her doppelganger switched places on that faithful day. Though Adelaide’s parents noticed a difference in their child, this difference, viewers learn, with therapy, could be negotiated. In no time, Adelaide resumes the nurture of her parents and becomes the girl they raised.

The original, for lack of a better word, Adelaide grows up to lead an uprising where the different or the othered, kill their counterparts. Us features a battle between those who reside behind the mirror—at society’s peripheral, and those who look into the mirror and reside at the center. Peele never makes it clear who or what these beings are. The sole reference to identity the film gives is Red’s proclamation that they too are “Americans.”
Red (or Adelaide depending on your perception), to ensure that her initial plan remains in motion, eventually kills the girl whose place she took years. Her son is the only one who knows her secret, a connection she hints at with the early line “stick with me kid and I’ll keep you safe.” Here, Adelaide foreshadows the choice her son will eventually have towards the end of the movie, to share or remain silent. Red/Adelaine’s offspring is also coupled, as he encompasses both the center and the peripheral. Thus, the secret is a gateway to his understanding of self, a gift obscured from the realities of his sister and father.
The film as a whole exhibits a coupling distinct from what it delineates in part. Peele couples black actors with their American counterparts. Specifically, the media exhibits black bodies by way of representation, but the exhibited blackness remains superficial.

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For example, though Winston Duke and Lupita Nyong’o, who occupy the film’s lead roles, encompass a physical blackness in their melanin-dominant appearance, both play roles that could easily be played by white actors. Black actors in race-less roles, marks what the western world calls progress; however, this colorblind casting depicts the violent seizure of power from black people. Colorblind casting extracts black personhood from the black body. Specifically, colorblind roles attempt to circumvent the presumed problem of race. Race in this context also functions superficially; as color is a part, not the whole, of racism. Yet, Peele’s film attempts to showcase those often eliminated from lead roles because of their complexion in a role where their complexion is merely a coicidence. Us eliminates race in a world build on this falsified concept made real in the systemic disenfranchisement it continues to afford black people.
Thus, US makes “us,” or the black person, invisible by casting melanin dominate actors as coupled with an American identity that has never truly been theirs.
US and Social Reproduction of the Invisible [Wo]Man
Though I do not think it was intentional, Peele presents a diasporic discourse with Us. Particularly, the coupled identities that dominate the film illustrate the black individual as coupled by a collective identity. The envy dynamic present between Adeline and Red illustrates the envy many blacks within the diaspora have towards the black displaced in America, or what I will call the “invisible man.” The phrasing “invisible man” alludes to the Ellison novel where a nameless protagonist struggles to see himself in a world built on his invisibility. My use of “man” does not cite gender but references “human.” This invisible man remains largely invisible to his diasporic brethren who often view him or her as a “favored child” in the disillusion of black disruption. Us, in its depiction of black persons as the invisible man, depict the coupling of the black body and personhood as crippled by disallusion.

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By the film’s end, Adeline loses her life because her diasporic doppelganger (Red, who eventually becomes Adeline) wishes to be her; so, Red assumes Adeline’s space and takes her place. This is very much the reality for black people throughout America who have witnessed the perils of racism and prejudice, perils strategically aggravated by immigration. Buried by the fantasy that is American idealism, the invisible man remains invisible to many of their diasporic brethren who are often unable see to past this veiled reality. Instead, this invisible man becomes a hyper-site for a social reproduction that affords white hegemony its violent stagnancy.
In Us, Adeline encompasses the “invisible man” ideal that her counterpart seeks to socially reproduce. Red sees the space Adeline occupies as a bridge to a better life. She (Red) deems her position in American’s peripheral as inferior to the central placement of her doppelganger (Adeline). This notion is particularly complicated by Peele’s colorblind roles, where the black actor remains in the periphery despite seemingly central placement.
Nevertheless, I digress.
Red believes that she is more deserving of the space Adeline occupies and thus would occupy said space “better.” This is often the ideology many Africans in America face with our diasporic brethren who become “model minorities” in seeking to occupy the American space “better” than their kidnapped kinfolk. America, for the being of black form, is a site of physical and mental abduction perpetuated by the continued pressure to assimilate. This assimilation, despite its societal perception, does not mark achievement but cultural compromise. Thus, it is Red’s desire to socially reproduce the invisible man that drives her sadistic and physically violent attempt to take-over an exclusive space. It is this desire to socially reproduce the invisible man that makes the mentally enslaved black predisposed to attack those who look like them and not their true oppressors. As long as the oppressed see themselves as the enemy, the narrative remains focused on the oppressors. Thus, Red/Adeline and her diasporic counterpart cannot co-exist because then the narrative runs the risk of becoming “us,” and within this global paradigm of white supremacy, it must always be about “them.”

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Peele’s colorblind casting alludes to the Duboisian notion of double consciousness in his depiction of the black person is physically split into two selves. So while viewers physically see black actors, the main role remains reserved for white cultural hegemony. What I mean here is that viewers see black actors but are forced to engage with the white space these black actors wish to occupy rather than the black actors themselves. It is the desire for American-ness, or to exist beyond blackness, that makes Us’s viewing experience a visual engagement with the invisible man. Specifically, with “Us,” black viewers witness what will become of them if espoused to an American identity. The film functions as a visual illustration of the “black American” or “African-American” concept that the abducted Africans in America must detach from as a rudimentary step in our collective liberation.

Buried under the American fantasy and entombed by the fiction of progress, there is no “us.” This fact is perhaps best illustrated when Red kills another black women to aid in a white plight to assume a space.
It is Red’s desire to socially reproduce the invisible man that drives her sadistic and physically violent attempt to take-over an exclusive space. It is this desire to socially reproduce the invisible man that makes the mentally enslaved black predisposed to attack those who look like them and not their true oppressors. As long as the oppressed see themselves as the enemy, the narrative remains focused on the oppressors. Red/Adeline and her diasporic counterpart cannot co-exist because then the narrative runs the risk of becoming “us,” and within this global paradigm of white supremacy, it must always be about “them.”
The singularity Red seeks and attains ensures that there is no “us,” if there ever was an “us.” Her actions represents the inevitable end for a group who remains disrupted. As a product of a festered disruption, the black collective, in part remains what they made of “us.” The black representation seen on-screen and throughout politics, education, and every other field, is not us and has never been us. It’s them.
Conclusively, as evidenced by his latest film venture, Jordan Peele also fails to represent us; rather, he remains vested in “them.”

Rapper Nipsey Hussle killed! But why?

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he term “Hustle” in the online variations of a dictionary, carries 15 deferent explanations. However the one that stood out to me for this article explains hustle as having “busy movement and activity”. The term was first used in the late 17th century (originally in the sense ‘shake or toss’). It originated from Middle Dutch hutselen. Hustle became a household verb and or noun dating from the early 20th century and in today’s urban lingo (another name for black people talk), to hustle is to have the courage, confidence, self belief and self-determination to go out there ( in the world) and work for whatever you want, until you find the successes you want in life.

Sometime on Sunday March 31st, a young hustler, an Eritrean-American by the name of Ermias Davidson Asghedom , was murdered outside his place of business in Compton California. Like many who grew up in that part of Los Angles, young black men usually had a passion for sports or music, as a way to get out of the crushing poverty and racism of amurdikkka’s and California’s discrepancies in social and economic classes. And like most of these young men looking to change their circumstances, getting resources was tough, especially since Asghedom left his mother’s house at 14 to live with his grandmother. Asghedom said he got involved in street life as he tried to support himself, and he joined the gang Rollin 60’s Neighborhood Crips as a teenager. It was there he choose the moniker Nipsey Hustle and got into rapping and songwriting. Emerging from the West Coast hip hop scene in the mid-2000s, He initially became known for his numerous mixtapes, including his Bullets Ain’t Got No Name series, The Marathon, The Marathon Continues and Crenshaw, the latter of which rapper Jay-Z, bought 100 copies for $100 each. After much delay, his début studio album Victory Lap was released in February 2018 to critical acclaim and commercial success, and was nominated for Best Rap Album at the 61st Annual Grammy Awards in 2019. All this before he reached 33 years of age But more important than all of that, Nipsey Hustle overstood the Afurakan concept of “If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together”.

Hustle believed whole heartedly in giving back to the streets and community that supported his rise to the top, without the oppression of record companies and agents who always look to syphon off the energies and blood of talented artists to engorged themselves. Outside of music, Nipsey Hussle said he wanted to provide hope and motivation to those who grew up in Crenshaw like him, and pay it forward. In that vein, being a strong businessman, the rapper and business partner Dave Gross purchased the Crenshaw plaza where his Marathon Clothing store is located, and had plans to knock it down and “rebuild it as a six-story residential building atop a commercial plaza where a revamped Marathon store will be the anchor tenant.” Think about this for a moment. He just bought a whole strip mall, a strip mall he used to hustle his mixed tape in front off, out of the trunk of his car. He was about to open a co-working space and teach financial literacy to the disenfranchised of the Compton neighborhood of Crenshaw. Yet Some unknown gun man killed him and wounded two others standing close by. Apparently in front of his wife and daughter. I hope the last wasn’t true, because that would be very disturbing and traumatic for them. According to numerous reactions Hustle was killed because he was about to make a documentary on murdered Afurakan herbalist-nutritionists Dr. Sebi and his trial for claiming ( and proving) to cure people of AIDS. Many counter reactions by kneegrows…the cave monkey don’t count…was that the conspiracy theorists are out with their tin foil hats. Below is a video he did with the breakfast club recently.

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Now I am not here to praise this rapper or worship him as a celebrity. That’s not my style. I am however shocked at the seemingly senseless murder of a man who by all accounts was doing some much and putting back so much into a community lacking much positive media spotlight or positive anything. After all Compton is notorious for being the origin of the Crips and later Blood, a fratricidal gang of lost men and boys, that was created in 1969. Compton is a place infamous for its violent gangs and dirty streets. Extending from the remains of a once prosperous suburban community, in the uncaring eyes of most of this shit hole country, Compton has become a broken city, reflected through its society and reputation. The poverty-stricken South Central LA area is now recognized nationwide by one thing, and one thing only. Its gangs. But what led to the rise of the prominent Crips and Bloods? Many middle-class Afurakan citizens of amurdikkka started moving to Compton, from the South to escape Jim Crow abuses, but also to seek job opportunities in the North and West of the country. Many ended up in this predominately white community. For a long time Compton’s population was mostly white and today still boasts a fair amount of white Americans. Making up about 16% of the current population, although that is not very commonly known. The addition of Afurakan citizens of amurdikkka changed the demographic of Compton, but that did not go over well with Europeans. Afurakan were far from accepted with open arms and faced a lot of discrimination and racism. The City Council even tried dismantling the Compton Police Department in order to exclude Afurakan…from law enforcement. All of this set the precedent for the racial injustice that would continue to buildup through time in Compton.


Police assaults, as well as the encouragement of assaults by citizens without any punishment, weighed heavy on the spirits of a people who only wanted to live their life without stress. The racial unrest that still continues today has greatly influenced what Compton has become. As it became more and more of a Afurakan community, Compton saw a great economic decline, as business and employment moved out of the neighbourhoods, which escalated even more after the conclusion of WWII. Many were left jobless and poverty rose. Unfortunately, it would just get worse from there. Due to the fact that Compton was now a predominantly Afurakan community it received much less help from the County and the State than other cities where a majority where white did. This racism and inequality not only damped the economy, but due to the fact that having Afurakan neighbors was considered a bad thing, property values plummeted as well. More than a few young men came together to protect their neighbourhoods from roving bands of citizens and undercover race soldiers, who history has shown us, always swoop down on Afurakans to sow terror among. Compton’s situation continued to drastically worsen and after most white people and jobs left the area, many started to turn to crime and drugs looking for an economic solution. This is the reason gang culture became so prominent here and in other depressed cities. The most notorious gang was the Crips, who sought to fill the void left after the dismantling of the Black Panther Party by Nazi Ronald Ray-gun and the vipers of California’s Gestapo police force. The mixture of racial unrest and economic depression was just enough to set the right atmosphere for gangs to arise. Gangs were a simple, dangerous, adrenalin filled way of making cash. They could deal drugs, rob people and stores, and come up with a healthy profit. Many frustrated youth turned to this system.
Like everything else the children of slaves touched, without a cultural foundation it often turned to shit! The gangs that formed decided to fight AGAINST each other for survival instead of uniting against the government and outside forces, bent on eliminating them or had suppressed them before. Herbert Anthony Stevens, better know by his stage name “Ab-Soul,” is a rapper from Los Angeles who hypothesized in his song “Terrorist Threats,” “If all the gangs in the world unified, we’d stand a chance against the military tonight.” Instead it seemed gangs formed rivalries and worked to try to out due each other in terms of territory and revenue. What I find interesting is not that Nipsey Hustle was doing a documentary on Dr. Sebi. No…what I find interesting is two-fold. First, he was providing economic relief and hope for a whole neighbourhood. He expected to teach and train future leaders and entrepreneurs to break stereotypes and eventually compete on their own merit. Now that is a powerful vision. Hustle had influenced so many people, even those not in his circle, because he was one of a very few who reached back to help his brother and sister up. The other interesting thing I read was that he was shot in the head. From a far distance. Anybody who does gun training, including military or police training, will tell you a head shot is a very skilled and difficult thing from a distance. None of the survivors saw a gun man. There was no drive by. Which is prompting the police to score street cameras and asking for assistance. This could only mean that the shooter was a distance away. Somewhere in sniper distance. Kneegrows don’t do sniper shit, unless they are ex military or police snipers themselves. We usually do a drive by, ride by or run up and spray everybody, sometimes hitting people we didn’t mean to hit. Yet a head shot? With two other people wounded for effect?
Things that make you go mmmmm?
Rapper Nas mourned Hussle’s death on Instagram and wrote, “It’s dangerous to be an MC. Dangerous to be a b-ball player. It’s dangerous to have money. Dangerous To Be A Black Man.” Somebody else mentioned that this echoes “the same pattern, (where) someone comes along trying to enlighten and change the cycle and they’re killed. Every time….” If you follow the bouncing ball and recall that last year the story broke that Latino gangs were brought in by local authority to kill, burn and bomb out black neighbourhoods to make them unlivable.

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And it has high value real estate. Compton is one such area that through gentrification could be a boon and boost for white or non black business and residence to swoop in and take advantage of another “abandoned black neighborhood”. Teaching black people to take back their community is trending right now. It’s however a dangerous trend to people who see real estate as the ultimate base of power.
Real Estate: from the Latin Real (Royal) Estate (land). Real Estate and the fight over it, has caused more wars and family break ups than trade wars or vagina ( Helen of Troy any one?) has ever done. During the rise of European Feudalism, which corresponded with the demise of the European Monarchy, land was leased out to tenants to farm and lived on, but never owned. I once sat in a lecture on entrepreneurship where the speaker mentioned that for McDonald’s…yes that one…wealth is not in their restaurant, but in the real estate they were able to purchase to put the restaurants on. Banks are notorious for owning the land they sit on and rarely if ever sell that property. Preferring to rent or lease any business on that former bank site. Real Estate and the need to own land, has been the boon and bane of many cultures not respectful of land sharing. None more so than the Europeans. It was Real Estate or land that made them come west to Turtle Island and surrounding lands. Some where searching for gold and diamonds, but many wanted land to have a new start in life. And didn’t mind killing a few black people along the way.
Read that last line again.

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Even today in Afuraka, the South Pacific, the Caribbean and South America, white people stealing lands and displacing the owners in order to mine, live on or place business on, is as naturally as them breathing air. After the great perversion that was chattel slavery was legal ended in order to remove the wealth of the plantation owners for the new wealth of the industrialists, black people were promised and never given their forty acres and a mule to fight the tribal war for the North against its redder neck cousin, in the South. And when we went west or north to find land, we inevitably were burned out, run out or murdered out right for the lands. And most of the time this was done with the direct and indirect support of local, state or federal governments. Ourstory is filled with such tales. None more egregious than the story of Black Wall street.

While many are claiming that some random black guy shot Ermias Davidson Asghedom, I prefer to say his real name ( otherwise known as Nipsey Hustle) I see the nefarious hands of white people in this. He was not some random thug, doing thug shit. This was a business man, who exemplified the amurdikkklan lie that anybody can pull themselves up by their boot strap. The lie is you as a Afurakan person, can do so without interference. White wealth has always been built on credit. That is, its built on white people taking credit for every thing black people do. Like building the economy of the South during our enslavement. Saving their assess in their civil war, their Revolutionary wars, WWI and WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the site of the Capital of amurdikkka and many other things that meritorious manumission would take care of. And for the record, most murders of famous people are committed in amurdikkka after they attempted to rally our people to raise our economic and land ownership status. I believe the fall out from this murder will either be that “line gun man on a grassy knoll” or some sucker “known to police” offered up as sacrifice. But how does a random black dude shooting him explained? Are they gonna say it was a drug deal gone bad? past beef? childhood revenge?, Gang activity? what will be the official police report?
Things that make you go mmmmm?

Article by BlackMyStory

Oprah Winfrey: The Devils Advocate?

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LET ME KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF OPRAH WINFREY? HAS SHE SOLD OUT?

Much love to my People(Taking a long hiatus)

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Peace family.  I hope you’ve all been well.  I know there’s a lot of things going on in the world right now.  Every day there’s some news about politics,racist incident,police brutality or celebrity gossip.  Most of the mainstream “news” is designed to distract us from real progress.  I have gotten a lot of information from WordPress,Facebook,Youtube,Twitter,Google,Yahoo and Instagram.  As well as the cable news and talk shows.Media2...

I do a lot of research for my posts.  It takes a quite a bit of work to find the right videos and pictures for a specific post.  But social media can be very draining at times. You can wear yourself out when trying to fight racism,expose conspiracies and decode this matrix we are currently trapped inside.  We are living in a synthetic reality.  I hope people have learned something from my blog over the last six years.  I have uploaded over 1,000 posts in that time.   But I couldn’t have done it without the help of other bloggers.  There are a few people who have shown me great support over the years.

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There are many bloggers and people I’ve chatted with on YouTube.  And many of them have opened my eyes to the deception around me.  They have made me look at things from a different perspective.  They made me challenge my own personal beliefs.  I’d like to thank fellow bloggers such as Moorbey,Land of Kam,Diary of a Negress,Original Black Woman,Onitaset Kumat,HungLikeJesus,Melanin Man,Chef Ahki,Shelby Courtland,Amos Magazine,Cliff Green,Lumumba Afrika,Chantel Keona,Sparking Thoughts,Cree7,Adunola the Oracle,Tahtahme Xero,Ajua Luv,Kelley,Sunny Delyte, CC Saunders,Jakke Brown,Brotha Wolf,No Black Pete,BlackMyStory,4thAngelsBowl,Queen Afua,Truth Angel,Naga Kanyah, Cynical Afrikan,Malaika Mutere,Alicia Monet,Trojan Pam(R.I.P),Queen Adira,Akings Truth,Hugh Cipher,Omay Farlane,Nidotopian Warrior,Wyzedome,Black Empowerment,Brother Osei, King Lo the Rastar,One Tawny Stranger,OldSchoolBlog,Roshumba Monique and Infinite Alkhemist.  I want to thank each and every one of you. You all have your own unique perspective on this crazy world we live in.  I want to thank each and every one of you for the information you’ve all given me over the years.  But I’ve been burned out as of late.  I have my own personal problems I’m going through.  I know you all have your problems as well.  I’ve taken breaks before but this one will probably be longer.  I have some things I need to work out.  And to be honest,trying to wake up people drains you.  I’ve been on this journey for a very long time.  It takes it’s toll on you.  But I do want to make something clear.  I have not giving up on my people.  Many times black people do let me down.  But I have not thrown in the towel on freedom and liberation.  That will always be priority number one. I’m not sure when I’ll be back blogging full time.  Even though I wont be blogging I’ll still be around.  I guess you could say I’m going “underground” for awhile.  I think 2019 will be a very stressful year for all of us.  I’m not sure what it will be but I feel as though something is coming. I think we all should be preparing in these uncertain times.  Look out for your family and friends. You guys take care. Peace and blessings. Your brother,KP.

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