Black Transgender Women/Men: Redefining Womanhood?

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Take a real good look at this person.  This is a black man. Or is it? Well I guess it depends on who you ask.  This person on the cover of Metro Weekly is Janet Mock.  The tagline on the magazine says “mighty real”.  Which is very misleading since there is not much real when looking at this cover.  You see Janet Mock  was born a man.  Which means he has a penis.   As far as I know he hasn’t had his penis removed so he’s still a man. But that’s my definition.  But according to this deranged European culture I’m living in I’m supposed to call him a woman. But isn’t Janet just a man in a dress? If I put on an astronaut suit does it make me an astronaut? If I paint myself white does it make me a white man?  I wouldn’t think so.  But the fact they we have to call these people a certain gender because it’s what they “feel” like shows you we are way off course.  We have really lost our minds.

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And what’s really scary is that more and more black people are accepting this false reality.  One of the most popular men  in this transgender movement  is Laverne Cox(pic above).  Cox has been on numerous mainstream magazine covers. He’s been on so many I’ve lost count.  Covers that many authentic black women have never been on.  Why is that?  Is the racist white media trying to redefine black womanhood? Are they trying to portray black women as more masculine by having men imitate them? Sure looks like it to me.  I think it’s a way to destroy the divine feminine principle. It seems like a combination of both sexism and racism.  In a way it’s an insult to both black men and women. Are they trying to get rid of black alpha males? This is really sick and twisted!

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Amiyah Scott....

Then we have actor Amiyah Scott. Amiyah is on the drama Star. Star is produced by well known homosexual Lee Daniels.  Much like his other show Empire,Star is full of masculine lesbians,homosexuals,transgenders,violence,crime and interracial sex.  All the things Daniels loves to portray as normal for the black community.  By having more transgenders on network television it normalizes it.  Which is the purpose in my view.

I don’t really follow the transgender/homosexual culture so I never knew about this.  But they actually have transgender contests.  It’s really big in Atlanta.  The video(above) is a contest in which men compete to see who looks the most like a woman.  It’s called the “I AM BALL” contest.  I could tell they were all men so I don’t know how the hell you pick  a winner.

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Not to be left out but they also have a competition for a female to male transition.  This is were females compete to see who looks the most like a man. This is really crazy to watch.  I can’t believe they actually have a contest for this type of thing.  What the hell is going on in Atlanta? I thought it was knows as “Black Mecca”.  Is this what our people are now embracing?

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche is a Nigerian writer of novels and short stories.  In the video(above) she says that you can’t compare the struggles of women that were born women with transwomen.  She says that it’s not the same thing because they have been women since birth.  Just so you know the term being used today is cisgender. You will hear terms like cis male or cis female.  Which means “male assigned male at birth”. Assigned??  I thought that you are whatever you were at birth.  But you see how they’re making up all these terms to confuse us. Well at any rate Adiche was attacked by actor Laverne Cox. Cox disagreed with Adiche’s statement.   Although she didn’t address Adiche directly,here’s the statement by Cox:

“I was talking to my twin brother today about whether he believes I had male privilege growing up. I was a very feminine child though I was assigned male at birth. My gender was constantly policed. I was told I acted like a girl and was bullied and shamed for that. My femininity did not make me feel privileged. I was a good student and was very much encouraged because of that but I saw cis girls who showed academic promise being nurtured in the black community I grew up in in Mobile, Ala. Gender exists on a spectrum & the binary narrative which suggests that all trans women transition from male privilege erases a lot of experiences and isn’t intersectional. Gender is constituted differently based on the culture we live in. There’s no universal experience of gender, of womanhood. To suggest that is essentialist & again not intersectional. Many of our feminist foremothers cautioned against such essentialism & not having an intersectional approach to feminism. Class, race, sexuality, ability, immigration status, education all influence the ways in which we experience privilege so though I was assigned male at birth I would contend that I did not enjoy male privilege prior to my transition. Patriarchy and cissexism punished my femininity and gender nonconformity. The irony of my life is prior to transition I was called a girl and after I am often called a man. Gender policing & the fact that gender binaries can only exist through strict policing complicates the concept of gendered privilege & that’s OK cause it’s complicated. Intersectionality complicates both male and cis privilege. This is why it is paramount that we continue to lift up diverse trans stories. For too many years there’s been far too few trans stories in the media. For over 60 years since Christine Jorgensen stepped off the plane from Europe and became the first internationally known trans woman the narrative about trans folks in the media was one of macho guy becomes a woman. That’s certainly not my story or the stories of many trans folks I know. That narrative often works to reinforce binaries rather than explode them. That explosion is the gender revolution I imagine,one of true gender self determination.”

What was this garbage?  This Cox character has lost his mind! All this talk of gender policing and gender binaries is total nonsense.  He was assigned male at birth because he is a MAN.  It’s just that simple.  All these terms are just going to confuse the younger generation.  They will see homosexuals,lesbians and transgenders as just normal behavior.    This is why men like Cox,Janet Mock and Amiyah Scott are given books and television appearances.

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This is another reason people are debating gender neutral restrooms.  Why is this even a debate?  A man in a dress should not be able to go into a women’s restroom.  There are little girls in there.  No one wants a man pretending to be a woman in a women’s restrooms.  And I don’t think most men would want a transgender men in a men’s restroom.  This shows you how sick European culture has become.  It is going right down the toilet.  And this is all by design.  And this is a serious issue for black people because we live among them.  It is destroying how we view sexuality and womanhood. As I said before I think it’s a way of redefining black womanhood. And to destroy the divine feminine principle.  I hope black people are paying attention.  We are truly living in Hell.

Child Molestation,Rape,Incest- No more Silent Condemnation!

This is a great video by Dr Rick Wallace.  He brings up the issue of silent condemnation when it comes to child molestation.  This is an issue a lot of black people don’t want to deal with.  Many people want to sweep it under the rug.  There are too many black girls and boys molested in the black community  and no one talks about it.  No one wants to talk about the rape and incest that goes on.  Many children grow up to be adults and never deal with the abuse. We also have to stop supporting entertainers like R&B singer R. Kelly and even hip hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa.  The black devils have to go!We can’t give our support to people that harm our children.  What type of message does it send when we support this type of behavior?  We got to do better family.  For the sake of our children.

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R. Kelly....

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Terrorism on Black children: Do we need our own Black Militia?

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Did you hear about this?  A fifteen year old black girl was raped on Facebook live!  And people watched this and did nothing!  This is disgusting!  This is heartbreaking to say the least.  Then when you think of the multiple black girls missing in Washington D.C. it makes matters much worse. I know a lot of are frustrated right now.  We have to protect our children at all costs.  They are being kidnapped for organ harvesting or being sex slaves.  The possibilities are endless.  We can’t let our babies be taken like this.  It got me thinking if we need our own black militia groups.  Maybe we need some type of black neighborhood watch across the country.  We actually need it worldwide to be honest.  But we need some type of organization from the grassroots level. And we need to expose any black person helping our enemies hurt our children.  We need a code of conduct of in the black community.  If you harm black children…you deserve DEATH!  Whether you are a black man or woman for that matter.  You are a traitor and must be dealt with harshly.  We need the black warriors to stand up now.  We can’t always rely on the police.  We can give information to authorities if we have it.  But we all know the police come after the fact.  They show up after the incident is over.  Which is we have to do some things on our own.  We need to be properly trained on firearms.  On how to use guns,knives and self defense tactics.  We need our entire families trained in survival.

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Do you think it’s important that black people know self defense?  Should it be taught to our children?  Do we need our own black neighborhood watch?  Something needs to be done?  We can’t just stand by and watch our children be raped and killed and do nothing.  We have to protect them no matter what.  Even at the cost of our own lives.  I’m open to any ideas and suggestions.  I would love to hear your thoughts on this urgent issues.

Urgent Message: Missing Black girls in Washington D.C.

Where are these black girls?  Who took them?  This is a serious issue!  And it doesn’t seem to be getting much media attention as it should.  It has been on a few Facebook and Instagram accounts.  But this should be getting mass media attention.  But of course if these were little white girls it would be all over the media.  It’s obvious that black lives do NOT matter in Amerikkka.  This should be a huge issue for black men and women.  We must protect our children.  We can’t just rely on racist cops and politicians to help us.  If they can help then that’s fine.  You can let authorities know if you have any information.  But they are still all just extensions of white supremacy.  But at some point we have to do some things on our own.  We need to start policing our own neighborhoods.  And get rid of these rapists,pedophiles and kidnappers among us.  It doesn’t matter if the culprits or black or white.  Or if it’s a man of woman.  The black devils in our community have to be exposed!  I have NO sympathy or patience for those that harm children.  I don’t give a damn what color you might be. It’s time for real warriors to STAND UP!  Black men should be upset right now!  You should be pissed off!  What happen to them?Some say it could organ harvesting. Others say it could be underground sex trafficking. They could be raped or murdered for all we know.

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http://www.blackandmissinginc.com/cdad/

Was Fidel Castro a friend to Africans?

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The Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro passed away on Friday 25th November. I am not going to provide an account of the Cuban Revolution, rather I just wanted to pay a brief, but heartfelt tribute to Castro, without deifying him or pretending that he was perfect, which is a common tendency when people write about people they admire. Why do I admire Castro? Is it because I am a Communist or Marxist revolutionary? No, certainly not. I admire him because he was one of the few true friends, in terms of significant political leaders, that Afrika has had during the 20th century. Whilst some of the Afrikan leaders of the ‘frontline states’, during the apartheid era in South Africa,  either sat passively by or in some cases, actively co-operated with the apartheid regime, such as the arrogant neo-colonial lackey Dr Hastings Banda who “… was careful never to appear radical in front of the former colonial masters and pleased the British government by maintaining trade and contact with South Africa, condemning his fellow African leaders more than he did apartheid.”  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/obituary-dr-hastings-banda-1296534.html  Fidel Castro put Cuban forces into battle against colonial regimes in South Africa, Namibia, Mozambique and Angola. Much Cuban blood was shed on the battlefields of Southern Africa in aid of Afrikan liberation.
A great example is the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale. “The battle of Cuito Cuanavale and the Cuban intervention in Angola is one of the turning points in Southern African History. It led to the movement of powerful Cuban armed force, into the west, towards the Namibian border. The fighting in the south western part of Angola led to the withdrawal of the South African, ANC and Cuban presence in Angola, and to the Independence of Namibia.”  http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/battle-cuito-cuanavale-1988 This battle was hugely significant in that it not only led to the withdrawal of South African troops from Angola and independence of Namibia, but it also destoyed the aura of invincibility surrounding the South African Defence Force (SADF), and was a  significant contributory factor in the release of Nelson Mandela and end of apartheid in South Africa.

You have to put this all into context by remembering that the white world vacillated between overt and covert support for the apartheid regime, as perhaps best exemplified by UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher referring to the Afrikaners as “our kith and kin” during a state visit to the UK by the then South African leader, the despicable war criminal, PW Botha. In global terms Cuba is a small island nation with a small population and which has been under economic and political attack by the United State ever since the revolution in 1959. Over the years there were more than a dozen documented assassination attempts against Castro by various US governments and yet despite living in the shadow of a hugely powerful; hostile neighbour, Castro had the vision and commitment to reach out to African people in Afrika, the Caribbean and other parts of the world and lend direct practical military, economic and medical aid. Just take the example of the massive earthquakes in Haiti where Cuba sent teams of doctors and the US sent in hordes of soldiers. That is a direct legacy of Fidel Castro and also illuminates the Euro-American mindset of always coming to conquer. Cuba even offered to send in medical teams in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina whilst the US government once again sent in teams of soldiers to face down a non-existent threat from the stranded, mostly Afrikan residents of New Orleans. Over the years Cuba has run a program giving free medical training to African-Americans.

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Castro should also be remembered for his strenuous attempts to wipe out racism in Cuba. I should be clear that he did not succeed in this, but it was not for the want of trying. Racism is still alive and kicking in Cuba as you can see by the behavior and attitudes of many of the European Cubans who migrate to the US from the island. Since, as I have mentioned many times before, racism is a normative part of European culture, all Castro could do was to suppress overt manifestations of racism in Cuba, but he could never kill its cultural root. I recall an Afrikan woman telling me of her holiday to Cuba, which took place in the last 10 years, and how she was constantly asked for her ID on the private beach associated with the hotel she was staying in and how it was regularly insinuated that she was a prostitute. You also have all of the skin color and shade issues in Cuba as is found in places such as Jamaica, UK, US etc. as well as the same European beauty ideal.

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Human Rights – We have to speak about human rights because this will be the biggest criticism made of Castro.  Did the Castro government suppress people’s human rights? To my mind the answer is obviously yes, however I think again we have to look at this in context. What do you think is going to happen when you lead a  tiny nation with the most powerful nation on Earth as a very hostile near neighbor which is  making every attempt to not only overthrow your government but also to directly kill you? It would be naive to think that you can have an open society under such abnormal conditions. Just take the failed ‘Bay of Pigs’ invasion in 1961 as an example of US hostility  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-13066561  No one knows for sure how Cuba would have developed if it was not faced with the ongoing US economic embargo designed to impoverish the Cuban people and destabilise the Cuban government.

The Future – With the transition of leadership to Fidel Castro’s brother Raul in 2008, the lifting of the US economic embargo and the flow of US money into Cuba which will become a tidal wave, the future for Cuba is likely to be Back to the Future. Prior to the revolution Cuba was a playground for the rich and famous from the US, a place where the Mafia could launder money and  centre for gambling, drugs and prostitution. I predict that in 5-10 years Cuba will be transformed. There will be huge infrastructure investment in the key tourist areas with hotels, casinos, theme parks etc popping up and a massive spike in property prices in these areas. Cuba will become one of the top holiday destinations for US citizens and will become a hotspot for sex tourism. Some Cubans are going to make  significant amounts of money, whilst the US transnational corporations are going to make a killing. Cuba will become yet another neo-colonial island in the sun.

Article written by Ifayomi Grant

Umoja Karamu- Embrace your Heritage

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Umoja Karamu (oo-MOH-jah kah-RAH-moo) is a celebration of unity within the African-American family, community, and nation. Umoja Karamu is a Swahili term meaning “unity feast.” Many African Americans celebrate this day as an alternative to the national Thanksgiving Day holiday. The unity feast may also be observed during Kwanzaa celebrations in late December.

The concept of African and African-American unity is centuries old. But during the 1960s and 1970s, it was a major focus of black nationalists. During the 1980s and 1990s, Afrocentric scholars such as Ishakamusa Barashango, lecturer, author, and founder of Philadelphia’s Temple of the Black Messiah, drew further attention to the theme.

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Barashango, who died in 2004, argued that African Americans and black people of the diaspora should reject such European-American holidays as Thanksgiving and concentrate instead on understanding Africa’s culture and values that are the distinctive heritage of black people.

In 1971 Brother Edward Simms Jr. of the Temple of the Black Messiah in Philadelphia developed Umoja Karamu to celebrate the African-American family and home. According to Barashango, Simms defined the purpose of Umoja Karamu as “an effort to inject new meaning and solidarity into the Black Family through ceremony and symbol.”

The date for the holiday, the fourth Sunday of November, was established by the Temple of the Black Messiah in Washington, D.C. African Americans in other cities, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Chicago, soon followed the example.

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The celebration is based on five periods of African-American life, each represented by a color.

  1. Prior to Slavery – the color black, represents black families before slavery
  2. In Slavery – the color white, symbolizes the scattering blacks families during slavery
  3. Upon Emancipation – the color red, marks blacks’ liberation from slavery
  4. Struggle for Liberation – the color green, significances the struggle for civil rights and equality
  5. Looking to the Future – the color gold, points celebrants to hope for the future