Slavery was way back then- Amos Wilson

Amos Wilson...

“I’m often somewhat amused and taken aback by the number of people in this society who claim that slavery occurred somewhere back then…and that the experience of slavery is not supposed to be operating in the mentality of black folks. You hear a lot of youngsters saying that as well.
“Why do you talk about slavery? That was back there.”
Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve never escaped slavery. We still share the slave consciousness of our great-great-grandparents. We are of the same mind to a great extent that they were. We have not advanced beyond these people.
How can I say that? I generally ask a series of questions. You say that slavery has nothing to do with you and that slavery was back there.
I ask you what language do you speak? When did you learn that language? Was that the language African people were speaking when we were taken into slavery in America? In other words, the language we speak at this moment is a slave language.
The language that our slave ancestors were forced to learn. And we still speak it and you can still hear the pidgin, the Creole and the other kinds of stuff in our language right now. That language, with its words defined by history and by experience, is the language we use today to guide our behavior. It’s the language we use today to talk to ourselves.
It’s the language we use today to learn about ourselves and to learn about the world. It’s the language we use to try to understand ourselves. Is there no wonder then that we are still confused? So we have not escaped slavery because we are still using a slave language, and we speak the language of slaves.

Slavery..
What kind of food do you eat? You say, “soul food”? Was that the food of African  people? Slave food. The food that we find most satisfying. The food that we find that sticks to our ribs. The food that we call “down home”.
A food that we learned to eat in the quarters.
And yet we dare say that we have escaped slavery. That we have nothing to do with those people back there. When our whole very social life and social relationships, our very definition of ourselves as a people, our very attempt to commune with ourselves is mediated by the food of slaves. How can you say you exist in a different consciousness from another people?
What kind of uniforms are we wearing? What kind of clothes are we wearing? Were these the clothes of African people? This is what we’ve got to look at.
What kind of names do we respond to? What kind of names do we identify with? Why is it that African names sound strange to us now as a people? And yet we dare say we have a different consciousness from our great-grandparents. How can we say that?
We are still in the same consciousness and we are still in the same position.
Because we are still servants of the white man, and our reason for being in America is to serve white folks and to generate wealth for them. And there has been no change at all in terms of our relationship to these people. I’m often somewhat amused and taken aback by the number of people in this society who claim that slavery occurred somewhere back then…and that the experience of slavery is not supposed to be operating in the mentality of black folks. You hear a lot of youngsters saying that as well.
“Why do you talk about slavery? That was back there.”
Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve never escaped slavery. We still share the slave consciousness of our great-great-grandparents. We are of the same mind to a great extent that they were. We have not advanced beyond these people.
How can I say that? I generally ask a series of questions. You say that slavery has nothing to do with you and that slavery was back there.
I ask you what language do you speak? When did you learn that language? Was that the language African people were speaking when we were taken into slavery in America? In other words, the language we speak at this moment is a slave language.
The language that our slave ancestors were forced to learn. And we still speak it and you can still hear the pidgin, the Creole and the other kinds of stuff in our language right now. That language, with its words defined by history and by experience, is the language we use today to guide our behavior. It’s the language we use today to talk to ourselves.
It’s the language we use today to learn about ourselves and to learn about the world. It’s the language we use to try to understand ourselves. Is there no wonder then that we are still confused? So we have not escaped slavery because we are still using a slave language, and we speak the language of slaves.
What kind of food do you eat? You say, “soul food”? Was that the food of African  people? Slave food. The food that we find most satisfying. The food that we find that sticks to our ribs. The food that we call “down home”.
A food that we learned to eat in the quarters.
And yet we dare say that we have escaped slavery. That we have nothing to do with those people back there. When our whole very social life and social relationships, our very definition of ourselves as a people, our very attempt to commune with ourselves is mediated by the food of slaves. How can you say you exist in a different consciousness from another people?
What kind of uniforms are we wearing? What kind of clothes are we wearing? Were these the clothes of African people? This is what we’ve got to look at.
What kind of names do we respond to? What kind of names do we identify with? Why is it that African names sound strange to us now as a people? And yet we dare say we have a different consciousness from our great-grandparents. How can we say that?
We are still in the same consciousness and we are still in the same position.
Because we are still servants of the white man, and our reason for being in America is to serve white folks and to generate wealth for them. And there has been no change at all in terms of our relationship to these people.”

14 thoughts on “Slavery was way back then- Amos Wilson

  1. Hey prince seems like most black people there still suffer from mental slavery than physical slavery that your ancestors went through well most black people around the world still are people tend to forget that the situation black people are in right now is because of what our ancestors went through even here in Africa black people have that mentality of trying to “forget the past” by some way but I’m glad that I still speak my Zulu language fluently. THANK YOU

  2. But all I see are a lot of questions asked, but no solutions. What are we supposed to do? It is as if the man is saying that we are somehow to blame for our enslavement and even if we are awake to the fact that we know the language we speak is not that of our ancestors, how is that on us? It was a crime to even teach a slave to read or write at one point. And the language of our slave ancestors were varied seeing as how they were stolen from different parts of Africa.

    “Soul food” was given that distinction, I believe, because it was the food that ‘Massa’ wouldn’t eat and so the slaves turned it into something that was filling for them. They took what they had and they worked with it. And if nothing is ours, then how can we say that others are attempting to steal ‘our’ culture if everything we are is fake assed anyway? From our braids to our Afros to our cornrows to our dance to our music to our food?

    Millions of us are aware that we are still slaves. Hell! Africa itself, is still enslaved for if not, then why are African nations still paying ‘slave taxes’ to colonizers? Those people over there are still under the boot of France, Europe, China and damn near every other country or nation on this planet and we are descendants of that? So if they can’t get their act together from whence we came, how in hell are we supposed to? Hell if I would still be paying a ‘slave’ tax to France in this day and age.

    “African countries continue to pay colonial tax to France 50 years after their independence. This system is an abomination destined to keep African countries poor forever!”
    https://afrolegends.com/2017/05/01/the-11-components-of-the-french-colonial-tax-in-africa/

  3. This is why I always give the side eye when people say that. I also hear people exaggerating how many years it has been since slavery ended. Sometimes, I’ve heard people say slavery ended 500 years ago. It actually haven’t even been 200 years since slavery ended. I think this type of thinking comes from whitewashing. White people don’t want us to talk about slavery & how it still affects us today because it will cause them guilt, so they try to tell us this as an excuse. Apparently, many black people have accepted it. Sad.

    http://www.mysparkingthoughts.com

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