Lee Daniels & Danny Strong: Masters of Black Degradation

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The above picture is director/producer Lee Daniels and Danny Strong. This “dynamic duo” is doing everything they can to vilify and destroy the image of black people. Danny Strong is a man of Jewish descent. And of course most of Hollywood is ran and controlled by Jews. So I don’t think Strong is losing any sleep about promoting negative stereotypes of black people. Strong could care less about the plight of black people. But Daniels seems more than happy to help him in his quest. I’ve seen many of Daniels films over the years. He’s directed films like Shadowboxer,The Paperboy,Precious and The Butler. Daniels also produced Monster’s ball and The Woodsman. The Woodsman starred actor Kevin Bacon. It was about a  pedophile trying to “reform”.  Sounds very inspiring right?  Many of his films seem to follow a pattern. They always seem to involve rape,incest,interracial sex,black degradation,colorism,anti-blackness and homosexuality. And many times these subjects are seem in a positive light. It’s like his films are either promoting these things or he’s trying to get us to understand these sexual perversions. I think Daniels is a mentally ill man. I’m not joking. I’m very serious.How can any self respecting black man promote these things? He should be ashamed of himself. This man must be insane!

The screenplay for The Butler was written by Danny Strong. A film that was made to remind us we as black people are still servants in this country. Now Daniels and Strong have teamed up again to bring us the new drama…EMPIRE.

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This show has been getting huge ratings since it premiered a few weeks ago. It stars Terrence Howard and Taraji P. Henson. The negative stereotypes are endless. Terrence plays music mogul Lucious Lyon. And Taraji is his ex wife Cookie. Lucious and Cookie??? Not stereotypical names at all right? But ir doesn’t stop there. He has three sons involved in the company.

His son Andre plays the clean shaven,educated,corny sellout Uncle Tom. Of course he has MUST have a white wife right?

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Then there is Jamal. He is the passionate songwriter. The sensitive misunderstood homosexual son. His gay lover is a Latino man.

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An interracial gay couple! I wonder where Lee Daniels got the idea for that relationship?

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Oh yeah! Never mind.

Lee Daniels was also kind enough to give Gabourey Sibide a part on the show. She most famous for playing the star in the film Precious. She plays the dark skinned overweight,blonde weave wearing assistant for Lucious Lyon.

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Cookie also has an assistant. Her name is Porsha. Played by actress Ta’Rhonda Jones.

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Much like Cookie,Porsha plays a brash,loud mouth ghetto talking black woman. I also noticed that there was a black maid in an episode. She was dark skinned just like Gabourey and Ta’Rhonda. I hope this is not colorism. I hope Daniels is not trying to tell us subliminally that dark skinned people should be seen as servants to others. Of course not! He would never try to brainwash us like that……..would he? Then there is the son,Hakeem. He is the aspiring rapper that wants to please his father. Hakeem is an ignorant,self centered sex- crazed fool. Not much different than his mother Cookie. Even the father Lucious is trying to be a shrewd businessman in the corporate world. But he ends up killing his best friend. So this reinforces the idea that the black man is still a cold blooded killer at heart. This show is NOT good for black people. Everyone is double crossing each other. It paints black people with a broad brush. This is no different than the sick reality shows. Black people must change our way of thinking. We have to stop gravitating towards ignorance and things that put us in a negative light. Danny Strong is a sick,twisted racist man! He knows exactly what he’s doing. What does he know about black life? Not one damn thing!! He’s filled this show with every negative self destructive stereotype of black people you can name. This Jewish man is an enemy to black people. I also suspect he’s a homosexual,which is why he and Daniels promote it so much.

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Lee Daniels is an enemy too. I realize that white supremacy is the REAL enemy. As well as the Jewish controlled media. But the time has come to call out some people. Daniels is a self hating,narcissistic,mentally ill man. And shows like Empire promote black dysfunction as normal. And Lee Daniels and Danny Strong have perfected the art of black misery.Their films and television shows show black people as pitiful,unloved,unworthy and devalued. It’s time to say….NO MORE!!

Mariam Makeba- Conqueror writes His(story)

Miriam Makeba Portrait Session

The conqueror writes history; they came, they conquered, they write. You don’t expect people who came to invade us to write the truth about us. They will always write negative things about us and they have to do that because they have to justify their invasion in all countries.

The Education of Black Children

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“The Afrikan American community cannot maximize its existence and quality of life unless and until it educates its parents, caregivers, and those who school its children, along lines appropriate to optimizing their mental and physical potential as well as their Afrikan consciousness, identity and common humanity. A significant part of the social chaos so typical of American society, in general, can be blamed on the fact that there is little, if any, formal preparation for full adulthood and responsibility.

The revolutionary change in the education of Afrikan children must begin with changes in the parent-child caretaker-infant relationship, followed by changes in the pre-school, elementary, secondary and post-secondary and school environments.”- Amos N. Wilson

African Proverbs about Leadership

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A shepherd does not strike his sheep. ~Nigerian Proverb

The foolish cannot be leaders. ~Kenyan Proverb

Rulers are like hills; when darkness falls, they all speak alike. ~Ugandan Proverb

The words of the elders become sweet some day. ~Malawian Proverb

The elders of the village are the boundaries. ~Ghanaian Proverb

A leader does not wish for war. ~Kenyan Proverb

A community without elders does not prosper. ~Mozambican Proverb

An elder can be advised but never insulted. ~Kenyan Proverb

If the owner of the land leads you, you cannot get lost. ~Ugandan Proverb

Two leaders do not fight in one house. ~Ugandan Proverb

Madness does not govern a country; discussion does. ~Ethiopian Proverb

Do not be a leader and use it to your own advantage. ~Ugandan Proverb

Patience puts a crown on the head. ~Ugandan Proverb

A leader in the community without a pot belly is a stingy man. ~Nigerian Proverb

The leader knows the reality. ~Kenyan Proverb

One does not like to be under a strict leader. ~Ugandan Proverb

From the word of an elder is derived a bone. ~Rwandan and Rundian Proverb

That which gains the attention of a leader will be solved. ~Ugandan Proverb

Prefer the leader who comes to you. ~Ugandan Proverb

Without a leader, black ants are confused. ~Ugandan Proverb

A leader who understands proverbs reconciles difficulties. ~Nigerian Proverb

He who is destined for power does not have to fight for it. ~Ugandan Proverb

The fate that befalls the lowly will befall the leader. ~Ugandan Proverb

If a leader loves you, he makes sure you build your house on rock. ~Ugandan Proverb

A leader’s handbag is never completely empty. ~Ugandan Proverb

The one nearest to the enemy is the real leader. ~Ugandan Proverb

An army of sheep led by a lion can defeat an army of lions led by a sheep. ~Ghanaian Proverb

Being a leader is like a borrowed garment. ~Ugandan Proverb

If you are a leader, be like the moon, not like the sun. ~Congolese Proverb

The Divine Masculine Principle

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The Divine Masculine represents an archetypal ideal, the best and most inspiring, elevating, and restorative aspects of masculine expression and manifestation in the universe.

For those seeking an expanded understanding of the Self, the Divine Masculine is not a distant, detached, jealous and vengeful male deity. The Divine Masculine acts as a shining mirror of the Self, revealing aspects that need compassionate attention and support to become one’s highest potential.

As multifaceted, spiritually-embodied beings, we each have a complex psychological and emotional constitution that produces one’s inner health and outer reality. One of the two most fundamental aspects of being is the Divine Masculine archetype.

Each one of us, male and female, carries within our psyche both Divine Masculine and Divine Feminine archetype energies. From these archetypal energies come all our conscious thoughts, plans, desires, goals and agendas. These energies intertwine and cooperate to produce a uniquely personal expression and experience of life. Sexuality is just one expression in which this confluence of energies distinctly manifests. A male gendered body does not mean that only masculine energy is present. Gender (genitals, body) and the archetypal composition of the psyche are independent of each other.

For a man reading this, you may wish to expand your understanding of masculine archetypes and see how these are showing up currently in your life and then consider evoking a more fuller, or “higher” expression into one’s psyche. Men who consciously assimilate Divine Masculine archetype energy express higher levels of awareness and spiritual states of being along with greater satisfaction in life experience. Women reading this are equally served by contemplating Divine Masculine qualities while seeking to integrate these into their inner male expression.

The Sage archetype is a very important aspect of the Divine Masculine expression for our species. The Sage is closely aligned with the Priest archetype, however the Sage emanates an additional aspect of advocating “right action,” dharma. The Sage is the Ego in service to, and “right-relationship” with, the higher Self’s power.

The Sage observes, tracks, scans, monitors data from all sources (within and without) and channels wisdom leading to “right action.” The Sage is detached from ordinary life flow, watching and engaging energies with wisdom and toned action as needed for synchronistic harmony of life.

Being with a man in the fullness of the Sage archetype feels like this: Unheralded, he quietly and deftly shares with others wise counsel and channeled direction that shifts the receiver into new possibilities and pathways that reflect “right action” for their life path. He quietly supports the wisdom of others, not seeking acclaim or notice for his contribution. He is thoughtful and reflective and rests in his felt connection with spirit and grounded connection with the earth, Gaia, the source of his wisdom and insight.

The Sage’s importance comes to the fore during crisis and intense need. Through the uniquely formed conduit that the Sage embodies, wisdom and “right action” become clear. With the Sage’s contribution we feel confident and assured that our path is the right one for us, we respond to life with a calm easefulness that transitions crisis and change with grace and wisdom.

Where the Priest archetype has a primary focus on the “inward” realm, the Sage archetype has an “outward” focus of service —to manifest channeled wisdom into being.

The Warrior archetype is the most represented and exploited archetype in our culture—being elevated and revered by the dominant patriarchal society as: disciplined leader and protector. While these are two of the Warrior’s sterling qualities, it is what comprises his fullness that makes this archetype truly a divine expression.

Warrior qualities include: decisiveness and clarity of thought, selfless service, genuine humility, strength of experiential “knowing,” courage to do what serves the highest good even when it is a personal challenge to do so. He serves to maintain and support established systems and forms consciously, without blind rigidity, being exemplary in loyalty to a greater good beyond personal gain.

He remains calm and centered while under challenge. He is inwardly aligned and integrated—in touch with his feelings, being warm and compassionate, appreciative and generous at every opportunity. He fights “the good fight” in favor of benefiting the greater good and making life more fulfilling for everyone.

Being in the presence of a man in the fullness of the Warrior archetype feels like this: His strength of stature is evident and unheralded—not needing accolades or compliments. He contributes without fanfare or needing to direct or “lord” himself over others. He eagerly responds to requests of service showing respect to all—especially to those “elder” to him, as well as other men, women, children, animals and the earth.

He “knows himself” and finds his place in collaborative projects, being fulfilled and contented with the collaboration and not by ambition or competition. The man in the fullness of the Warrior makes you feel safe while not being oppressed by his stature or protection.

The Divine Feminine Principle

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In the context of traditional Africa, people are surrounded not by things but by beings; the first in rank being GOD . Although in many parts of Africa, God is conceived as male, in other instances there are feminine images.  For example, the Supreme gods of the Ewe of Ghana are Mawu-Lisa.  They are twins.   Mawu, the female is represented by the moon, while Lisa the male is represented by the sun.  As husband and wife , Mawu-Lisa had seven pairs of twins which became the major gods of the Ewe.  What is of major interest to us is the red wooden statue with large breasts and a crescent  in one hand found among the Ewe. This image of Mawu is the only known image of the Supreme Being in Africa.

The Akan of Ghana have a similar view  of God.  The  Ashanti  for example, have sometimes thought of [Nyame ] the SUPREME BEING as both male and female.  The female principle is symbolized by the moon which created human beings with water.  The male principle is symbolized by the sun.  The sun shot life-giving fire into the human veins and made human beings live.  Generally however, the women is seen as the MOTHER of humankind, from whom all people originated.  The Akposso  tell  that when God made human beings, he first made woman on the earth and bore her the first child, the first human being.  The main idea here , says Mbiti, is to link human life directly with God through the woman.  The woman herself is created by God and in turn becomes the instrument of human life.

Although the life of the first human beings is generally depicted as having been in a form of paradise, with God providing all the necessities of life, this paradise got lost.  EARTH and HEAVEN separated from each other and God went to live in heaven while human beings lived on the earth. And in place of the lost gifts came diseases  suffering, and death. Incidentally, the blame for this unfortunate tragedy is always put on the woman.   These myths of origin however, often give us a picture of the woman as someone placed in a special relationship with God with whom she shares the creative process of life and also the misfortunes, and death which in various ways came into the world.
THE DIVINITIES

Apart from belief in the Supreme Being, Africans do recognize lesser categories of spiritual forces.  These are considered more responsive to the needs of human beings in their secular and religious lives.  These divinities were created by God to fulfill specific functions.  They are regarded as the children of God or the messengers of God, or his agents.  They may be male or female, good or evil, may have their abode in the environment, such as trees, rocks, rivers, the sea and even certain animals.  They are however not confined to the physical objects in which they reside, since they have unlimited mobility and can move anywhere.  They are treated with respect when they fulfill human expectations.  However, they may be despised when they fail to deliver the goods.  In the cult of these divinities, there are both priests and priestesses who serve at their shrines or temples. However, the sex of the minister is not an indication of the sex of the divinity.  Each sex can operate as the messenger of the deity.  African traditional religion, is therefore less sexist in its image of the spiritual world as compared to other world religions.

It is this factor which has made it possible for both men and women to perform their sacred functions in the worship of God and his functionaries, the divinities, who incidentally are in both sexes.
SPIRIT OF THE EARTH

Next after the Supreme Being is the EARTH DEITY.  In most African societies, the earth is given a feminine image. The Akan of Ghana and the Igbo of Nigeria regard the earth as a goddess.  Among the Akan, she ranks next after the Supreme Being and the second deity to be offered a drink during worship.  Her day of rest is Thursday and severe punishment was meted out in the past to those who infringed this taboo.  Although there are no temples, shrines or priests dedicated to her, because her bounty is accessible to all,  She nonetheless receives offerings and sacrifices at the planting season.
The land generally cannot be farmed without asking for her permission.  When a grave is about to be dug the Spirit of the earth is offered sacrifice. The Igbo of Nigeria, unlike the Akan, dedicate shrines and priestesses to the Mother goddess, the Queen of the underworld who is responsible for public morality.  Homicide, kidnapping , stealing farm products, adultery and giving birth to twins or abnormal children are all offenses against her.  Laws are made and oaths sworn in her name.   According to Parrinder, Ani  is the most-loved deity, and the one who is closest to the people.  She helps them if they are in trouble with other divinities, but punishes hardened criminals.  Also the most important festival, the yam [harvest] festival is held in her honor receives offerings during the planting season, and  also when the first fruits are harvested.

Temporary houses [Mbari] made to accommodate sacred sculptures and other statues representing deities always contain  the statue of Ani which stands in the middle.  Here, she is depicted as a mother with a child in her arms or knees and a sword in her hand.  Facing Ala is the storm god a subordinate counterpart of the goddess.  The Mende of Sierra Leone also regard Mother earth as a goddess, the common mother of mankind  and the wife of God [Maa-ndoo].  Like the Akan, the Mende do not worship the Spirit of the earth, although she is invoked together with God [NGEWO]  during important occasions.  Laws are made to protect her sanctity, for example, sexual intercourse in the bush is a violation of her sacredness and offenders were severely punished.  Apart from the Earth goddess, several other deities are found residing in bodies of water.
SPIRITS OF WATER

It is alleged that the sexual identity of spiritual beings suggest that female deities like their human counterparts, ordinarily have domestic rather than communal orientation. Evidence at our disposal, however does not in any way point to the subordination of female deities to male deities.  All over Africa, water bodies like the sea, rivers lakes and lagoons are regarded as the habitats of deities and are thus treated with great reverence and sometimes worshipped at shrines with specially appointed priests and priestesses.  Yemoja,  the most prominent of the river divinities among the Yoruba, for example, is not only the mother of numerous river deities, but also the ruler of the Ogun river in Abeokuta.  She is also the mother of fishes  and the giver of children.  Women therefore pray to her for children, with yams and fowls.

There are other prominent river goddesses like Oya the goddess of the Niger river who is believed to be the companion , or one of the wives of SHANGO, the god of thunder.  She is so fierce and terrible that no  one can look upon her.  Oya is often identified with the wind that blows when no rain follows.  There are others like Orisha OKO, an important farm goddess.  Temples erected for her are the  most common of all the Yoruba divinities.  Women are her principal worshippers, especially during the yam festival.  There is no doubt that African traditional religion is life- affirming.

The religion seeks  to insure the fertility and vitality of human beings and the land on which  their own and other creatures’ livelihood depends. It is therefore reasonable that women pray to these divinities who are in direct control of fertility.

W0MEN IN RITES OF PASSAGE

Women frequently play important roles in personal rituals of status transformation associated with  birth, puberty and death.  At childbirth, women express gratitude to God with prayers and sacrifices, and at death they sing dirges to express their sorrow.  The most significant role of women is seen during girls nubility rites.  Marion Kilson has observed that “Wherever they occur  the principal officiants and participants are women.  Moreover, the symbolism of these rituals  vividly portray the essential cultural meaning of mature womanhood.  Such rituals express the dualistic  nature of women’s sexuality and the means by which the positive aspects of fertility may be harnessed for  social good and the negative aspects  of sexuality may be contained and socially controlled.

In Ghana,  the most well-preserved female puberty rites are the Dipo of the Krobo, and the Bragoro of the Asante.  So important were the ideals of these rites that its violation in former times constituted a crime.   A girl who became pregnant before the performance of the puberty rites was banished together with the man who was responsible for it.     Purification rites were performed to rid the society of its evil consequences.   It must be noted that not only did the puberty rites prepare the young for marriage, it also prepared them for procreation without which marriage was incomplete.  The ceremonies therefore, marked the entry of young girls into adulthood.  During the period of their ritual seclusion the young girls are taught the secrets of the society and also brought closely to the supernatural forces which are supposed to ensure their protection, blessing and fertility during their period of motherhood.   Mothers of such concerned girls usually pray that their daughters grow to full maturity and bear children.
MUSICAL ROLE OF WOMEN IN TRADITIONAL RELIGION

A lot of festivals  abound in African traditional religions.  A good number of them are in honor of the most important divinities and ancestors.  Of relevance to us is the phenomenon of singing and dancing by well-dressed women during the celebrations of these festivals.  Although the songs and dancing add luster to the  celebrations, they have a veiled but more important effect of curbing recalcitrant and criminally minded members of the community who during the year had broken the norms, convictions and customs prevalent in the community.  The songs are deliberately composed to highlight the abuses and crimes committed and expose the criminals.The singing groups, protected by the community’s traditions, perform the role of ‘the people’s court’  to whose verdict the culprits and their relations cannot pretend to be indifferent and against which they have no appeal.

In Ghana, the popular APOO festival  and others  share the same characteristics with some festivals in Nigeria.  The gaily dressed women, armed with well- rehearsed abusive songs move from house to house, mentioning names and coming down heavily on the social miscreants within the community.

Under the immunity graciously conferred by tradition ,the women boldly call out in songs the names of the offenders in front of their houses and contemptuously pour down condemnation on them.  By so doing these women help to cleanse society of social misfits by bringing to the open the sins committed under the cover of darkness.  Furthermore, with their ritual dances and singing women warm the hearts of the gods who by their nature, hate evil and always want to get rid of them.  Disarmed by the traditional immunity enjoyed by the women social non- conformist are either compelled to mend their ways or flee from the community.  This indeed, has been a very significant and effective mechanism of social control in many African countries.  It is important to note that as part of these celebrations, traditional rulers offer sacrifices to purify the community to remove the evils accumulated during the year, thus renewing the society.